WELL BEING & OTHER STORIES

Recipes, rituals and other stories to realign the body and mind

Vegetarian

The Best Hot Chocolate's To Cosy Up With This Winter

Drinks, Dairy Free, Essentials, Review, Seasonal, Sugar Free, Sweets + Desserts, Vegan, Vegetarian, Winterdanielle coppermanComment

Winter is approaching and although the Sun is still out here in London, all I want is a hot drink to settle down with. Fancy something different to your usual tea or coffee? Below are my favourite hot chocolate brands, the ideal warmer during winter months and also a perfect sweet snack to satisfy daytime or evening cravings. Add some extra components to these base ingredients, for added nutrition and / or flavour. I’m adding a shot or teaspoon of fresh turmeric or ginger juice to mine, and during the day, a little he shou wu, maca, tocos and ashwaganda. Embrace your inner alchemist!

1. Zenbunni’s Shaved Dark Chocolate - biodynamic, raw, handcrafted chocolate spiked with a selection of adaptogens. Mix with hot water or milk of choice.

2. Zenbunni’s Vanilla Reishi Gheenache - an alchemical blend of biodynamic and organic stone-ground chocolate and full moon-made ghee. A delicious and nutrient-dense superfood, it is filled with essential minerals, vitamins, and fats for a healthy & magical chocolate experience. Just mix with hot water or milk of choice.

3. Mörk Drinking Chocolate - crafted with cocoa powder, 100% cacao liquor and sweetened only with unrefined coconut blossom sugar. Mix with hot water or milk of choice.

4. Ombar Mylk Chocolate Buttons - Raw chocolate buttons make with creamed coconut and sweetened only with coconut sugar. Chop roughly and mix with hot water or milk of choice.

Or anything Ombar for that matter. Chop roughly and mix with hot water or milk of choice.

5. Loving Earth Creamy Drinking Chocolate - Fair trade, dairy-free, gluten-free, organic, vegan, vegetarian, and again, sweetened only with coconut nectar. Mix with hot water or milk of choice.

Pure Raw / Ceremonial Grade Cacao Powder - pure and simple. Mix with hot water or milk of choice, and sweeten gently if desired with natural syrup or other natural sweetener.

Archived hot chocolate recipes from the blog…

High Vibe Quinoa Hot Chocolate
Tahini Reishi Hot Chocolate

Quick Ginger Hot Chocolate Recipe

Either use 1/2 shot glass of fresh ginger juice (made using a juice or by blending 20-30g sliced fresh ginger with 60ml water) or brew 250ml water or plant-based milk of choice with either sliced fresh ginger or 2 ginger teabags. (You can also use ground ginger but the flavour wont be as strong, the nutrients wont be as active and you will find the ginger doesn’t dissolve and combine fully).

If using water, boil in the kettle and then add the shot of ginger juice or, if using fresh ginger, steep in a mug or small bowl. Add your chosen hot chocolate powder or solids, and stir to melt and combine.

If using a milk, heat in a small saucepan and add either the shot of fresh ginger juice or, if using, the fresh ginger slices. Bring to the boil and then simmer for 10-20 minutes. Leave on the hob but switch off the heat and continue to infuse for as long as possible (if you’re in a rush or don’t want to wait, you don’t need to do this extra infusion step, but if you have time, leave for an hour or so just to deepen the flavour). Then, stir in your chosen hot chocolate powder or solids, and stir to melt and combine.

Enjoy!

Finally ~ The Ultimate Chewy Chocolate Chip (Vegan!) Cookies

Gluten free, Dairy Free, Paleo, Recipe, Snacks, Sugar Free, Sweets + Desserts, Vegan, Vegetariandanielle copperman4 Comments
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I’m not even joking, I went as far as testing 4 different cookie recipes in 1 day a few weeks ago, and none of them came out how I wanted them to.

I revisited the challenge again this week though, and this story has a different ending. The best vegan cookies that have ever been.

To me, a cookie should be tough, crisp and gently crunchy on the outside, and soft, moist and chewy on the inside. It should definitely not be too crispy or biscuity, and at all crumbly. That’s the worst. What’s the point in a cookie if it isn’t chewy? I tried several different options that Sunday afternoon; some with egg, some without; some with coconut sugar, some with syrups; some with flour, some with ground nuts; some with coconut oil, some with olive oil. I even tried some chickpeas (the dough was insane, the baked version, not so much). All of them came out completely different and left me baffled by the science of cookies. Some were super light and fluffy and almost a dusty / sandy texture (inedible). Others were super oily and dense, but didn’t set properly or remained oily and moist like the dough it had been, rather than an actual cookie.

These, though, are the ones. They are the perfect texture - light and chewy, but not too dense or tough. In my opinion, they are more flavoursome than shop-bought cookies (which, since I’m now used to lower sugar foods, always taste too sweet and artificial, and somehow quite plain - maybe from the flour and the fact that the ingredients they contain are rarely fresh and hardly real food at all). Another couple of pros: these are make with completely natural ingredients (that’s where the flavour comes from) and are gluten free, paleo, and vegan. Uhhhhh. Who knew a cookie could hit so many spots?

They literally take about 5 minutes to make and 10-12 to bake. So you don’t have an excuse not to make these, really. Sorry.

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Components

Makes 6 large cookies

200g ground almonds
5 tablespoons natural syrup (about 100g) (I used dark agave but any natural syrup, like honey, maple or coconut nectar would also work)
3-4 tablespoons coconut palm sugar
1/2 teaspon bicarbonate soda
4 tablespoons coconut oil or olive oil (around 50-60g), melted
Generous pinch of salt for the dough and extra for topping
4 tablespoons gluten free flour - I use either buckwheat, rice, chickpea or chestnut
50-100g raw or dark chocolate - I use Ombar or 85-99% dark chocolate depending on what I can find locally

Optional

1/2 - 1 teaspoon ground ginger or grated or sliced fresh ginger
Chopped nuts (like hazelnut, pecans, pine nuts or walnuts)

Method

Preheat the oven to 175c.

Simply measure all of the ingredients - except for the chocolate - into a food process and pulse until they form a smooth dough. Ideally, it should begin to form a sticky, doughy ball, and the mixture should be smooth. Transfer to a medium mixing bowl. On a chopping board, roughly chop or crush the chocolate, if it is in a bar or buttons, to create small chocolate chunks. Stir the chocolate chunks into the dough mixture and use your hands to combine and distribute evenly throughout the dough.

Line a baking tray with baking paper. Take a small handful of mixture and roll into a compact ball, then place in the palm of one hand and flatten with the other hand. Aim to make each cookie about the size of the palm of your hand, and about 1cm thick. Place on the baking tray and continue to flatten gently with your figures, if necessary. Sprinkle with a pinch of salt, if desired.

Place in the oven and bake for 10 - 12 mins, until the edges begin to brown and the surface is tough and dry to touch. I remove mine around 10 minutes as they continue to cook a little as they cool, and they set as they cool, so don’t worry if they feel too soft when you remove them from the oven.

Enjoy warm or cooled, with a glass of hot or cold plant-based milk, adaptogen-spiked milk (I like cacao) or other hot drink of choice.

Store in an airtight container at room temperature for about 1-2 weeks.

Well Being Book Recipe ~ Chanterelle Mushroom, Lentil & Chestnut Casserole with White Bean Cloud Mash

Dinner, Recipe, Vegan, Vegetarian, Winter, Autumndanielle coppermanComment
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This recipe is inspired by a casserole dish I had in Stockholm. Chanterelle mushrooms were everywhere and I immediately took to their earthy, buttery flavour, much richer than the standard mushrooms I was used to. This recipe combines them with many of my favourite autumnal ingredients, creating a nourishing and warming casserole-like dish. For the simplest option, serve it with grains and vegetables or atop a cloud of white bean mash.

Components

For the casserole
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil or coconut oil
180g chestnuts, chopped (vacuum-packed)
1 garlic clove, crushed
1⁄2 white or red onion, chopped
250g chanterelle mushrooms, sliced
200g chestnut mushrooms, sliced
60g raw beetroot, chopped
200g puy lentils (yellow, orange or green lentils or mung beans will also work)
6 fresh sage leaves
2 sprigs of rosemary
200ml coconut milk or plant-based milk
1 tsp apple cider vinegar
200ml vegetable or meat stock
3 handfuls of spinach, chopped
2 large handfuls of cavelo nero, chopped
Sea salt and black pepper
For the white bean cloud mash
4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
400g tin cannellini / butter beans, rinsed and drained
60ml water or plant-based milk
Sea salt and black pepper

Method

Heat the oil in a large saucepan and, once hot, add the chestnuts, garlic, onion, mushrooms, beetroot, lentils, sage and rosemary. Sauté for 15 minutes and then add the coconut milk, vinegar and half of the stock. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Gradually add the remaining stock to loosen it, but you may not need it all.

Meanwhile, prepare your white bean mash. Put the oil and beans in a saucepan and set over a medium heat. Add half of the water or plant-based milk and then gently begin to break up the beans using a fork or a potato masher.

Add the remaining water or plant-based milk and continue to stir and mash until the beans completely loose their shape and the mixture becomes smooth and fluffy. Season to taste and remove from the heat. If you want a smoother result, blitz the mash in a blender for 30 seconds, with a little extra water or plant-based milk, if needed. Set aside.

Add the spinach and cavelo nero to the casserole and season with salt and pepper. Once the greens have wilted and the liquid has reduced, remove from the heat and serve instantly along with the mash.

Variation
Preheat the oven to 200°C . To make a shepherd’s pie variation, layer the white bean mash on top of the casserole. Bake for 15–20 minutes until the mash turns a warmer shade of white and the casserole begins to bubble underneath.

Well Being Book Recipe ~ Beetroot, Carrot + Coconut Soup

Brunch, Dinner, Lunch, Recipe, Well Being Book, Vegan, Vegetariandanielle coppermanComment
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This hearty soup uses ingredients associated with the root chakra (page 326), which works to keep us grounded with the Earth’s energy and, when balanced, can increase confidence, energy and openness. Signs of a blocked or misaligned root chakra include short temper, lack of motivation, anxiety and general frustration. Eating foods associated with this chakra can help to release these emotions. Serve with Magic Vegetable 'Bread' Rolls (page 314), toasted Miracle Bread (page 314), or Crackers (page 178).

Components

Serves 4 as a main, or 6 as a starter

2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil or coconut oil 1⁄2 red onion, diced
2 garlic cloves, crushed
5g fresh ginger, finely chopped
1 tsp ground coriander
3 large beetroots, peeled and chopped 2 carrots, peeled and chopped
600ml vegetable or bone broth (preferably homemade, page 315)
2 × 400ml cans (800ml) coconut milk
1 tsp dried thyme or lemon thyme
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Elevate it:
Juice of 1⁄2 lime

Method

In a large saucepan or stockpot, heat the oil over a medium heat. Once hot, add the onion, garlic, ginger and coriander and sauté for 5 minutes.

Add the beetroots, carrots and broth. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 20 minutes or until the beetroot is soft.

Allow to cool slightly, transfer to a blender (work in two batches if necessary) and add the coconut milk. Blend on a medium speed for 30 seconds and then increase to the highest speed for 10 seconds. Add more broth or water to thin the soup if it is too thick.

Return to the saucepan, add the thyme, season to taste with salt and pepper and add the lime juice, if using. Heat through, then divide among bowls and serve immediately.

Top with Nut Parmesan Sprinkle (page 313), a knob of Avocado 'Butter' (page 308), herb-infused oil (page 313) or a swirl of extra coconut milk.

Blend any leftovers with a can or two of chickpeas, to make a vibrant root- vegetable dip.

Qnola - Now Available on Ocado

Breakfast, Essentials, Paleo, Wake Up Well, Qnola, Vegetarian, Vegandanielle coppermanComment
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I’m super excited to announce that our full range of Qnola Breakfast Goods are now available on Ocado online. That means better distribution, nationwide, and all at the click of a few buttons. Since starting the business in 2014, it has been a dream of mine to produce and distribute Qnola to the masses and to reach more people and change the way we wake. If you haven’t yet been able to try Qnola, I hope our partnership with Ocado makes it more accessible for you.

The largest online supermarket, Ocado is passionate about delivering an exciting variety of innovative brands right to your doorstep. They carefully select their range of products meaning you'll always find a balance of unique and everyday items.

Ocado help small brands (like us!) reach more customers and we couldn't be more excited for Qnola to make it onto more breakfast tables across the country.

Spread the word, tell your friends and enjoy waking up well with even more ease! And please, if you have a few seconds, leave us a star rating or a short review - it means the world to us!

Well Being Book Recipe ~ Double Sweet Corn Fritters with Eggs & Avocado

Breakfast, Brunch, Lunch, Recipe, Vegetarian, Well Being Bookdanielle coppermanComment
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This recipe is perfect for low-energy mornings because, whilst it looks and tastes impressive, it is simple to prepare. The sweetcorn fritters stand in for conventional breakfast carbs and bring more nutrition to the table. For a very simple option, pair them with avocado or for something more extravagant, serve them with poached eggs, a selection of homemade dips, seaweed salad or greens and pickles or Sauerkraut (pages 316–317). Bacon, Coconut 'Bacon' (page 313) or smoked fish also make a nice addition.

Serves 4 (makes 6–8 fritters)

Components

4–8 eggs
2 avocados
1 tbsp lemon juice (optional) pinch of salt (optional)

For the sweetcorn fritters

350g corn kernels, cooked and cooled 1 large egg (or 1 tbsp chia gel, page 81) 1 tsp ground or freshly grated turmeric pinch of sea salt
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil, plus extra for frying
60g buckwheat flour
1⁄2 tsp baking powder
small handful of fresh coriander leaves (or other fresh herbs) freshly ground black pepper

Elevate it:

1 tsp shilajit powder, 1 tsp spirulina powder, 2 tbsp golden linseeds or chia seeds

Method

First, make the fritters. Place 100g of the corn in a blender and add the egg or chia gel, turmeric, salt and oil. Add any elevate ingredients, if using, and blend on a high-speed for 30 seconds, until it forms a thick, creamy paste. Once smooth, transfer to a bowl, add the remaining corn kernels, flour, baking powder and coriander (or other fresh herbs) and stir to combine. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Heat a little oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat and, once warm, spoon 3–4 large ladlefuls of batter – spaced apart to avoid them merging into one – into the pan. Flatten slightly with the back of a spoon and cook for 1–2 minutes, until brown and crisp, then flip and cook the other side for 1–2 minutes, until crispy. Repeat until all the batter has been used up.

Meanwhile, scramble, fry or poach your eggs. Next, prepare the avocado: cut each in half, remove the stones, and either slice thinly, lengthways, and scoop out the flesh, or into a bowl and mash with the lemon juice and salt.

Add cooled fritters to packed lunches in the place of sandwich bread.

Almond & Adaptogen Ananda Mouthfuls

Dairy Free, Gluten free, Recipe, Snacks, Sugar Free, Sweets + Desserts, Vegan, Vegetariandanielle copperman2 Comments
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I love to make some variation of these simple snacks every few weeks, and they're especially convenient if I am traveling a lot. I love to take them with me for the journey, and if i have the facilities where I am staying abroad, I always make them if I am staying somewhere for a while, as they are super easy to make and provide functional nutrition in an instant. They are high in protein, healthy fats, fibre and essential vitamins and minerals, and are a delicious way to incorporate a dose of your favourite adaptogens and / or tonic herbs if you want other ways to use them. Depending on the adaptogens you use, these mouthfuls have a host of physical and mental health benefits, and the bonus is that they taste like chewy caramels. Enjoy!

Components

50g gluten free oats (or cashews)
50g ground almonds (or whole almonds)
A generous pinch of salt
1 tbs vanilla vegan protein powder (i use The Welle Co or Innermost Health)
1 heaped teaspoon cinnamon
150g medjool or other soft dates (pitted and halved)
1.5 tablespoons coconut oil (soft, or melted)
60g almond butter or cashew butter, or a mixture of both

Optional adaptogens: (use one or several of the following, or add your own preferred adaptogens or tonic herbs)

1/4 teaspoon pearl
1/2 teaspoon ashwaganda
1 tablespoons tocorionels
1 tablespoon cacao
1 teaspoon he shou wu, cordyceps, reishi or chaga

Method

Start by blending the oats, ground or whole almonds, salt, protein powder, cinnamon and adaptogen powder of choice in a food processor, on the highest speed, until they form a fine, flour-like consistency. 

Next, add the dates and then blend again until the mixture becomes doughy and perhaps even forms a large, sticky ball. 

Next, add the coconut oil and the nut butter and blend a final time. The mixture should be smooth, sticky and doughy and may even begin to form a doughy ball. It should not be wet or paste-like. You should be able to handle it with your hands and it should hold together when you press or squeeze it.

Finally, roll the mixture into balls, or form into bars, (using individual moulds or pressing into a dish or loaf tin and then slicing into individual bars once they have set) and store in the fridge or freezer. I keep some in the fridge for an instant snack, and some in the freezer as they will keep for much longer, and take just seconds to thaw.

Salted Peanut version

Components

50g gluten free oats
80g roasted peanuts
Pinch of salt (don't use if your peanuts are already salted)
1 teaspoon vanilla powder or extract, or vegan or whey protein powder
250g medjool dates
50g peanut butter (could also use other nut butter)
1 tablespoon coconut oil, room temp

Optional adaptogens: (use one or several of the following, or add your own preferred adaptogens or tonic herbs)

1/4 teaspoon pearl
1/2 teaspoon ashwaganda
1 tablespoons tocorionels
1 tablespoon cacao
1 teaspoon he shou wu, cordyceps, reishi or chaga

Method

Start by blending the oats, peanuts, protein powder and adaptogen powders of choice in a food processor, on the highest speed, until they form a fine, flour-like consistency. 

Next, add the dates and then blend again until the mixture becomes doughy and perhaps even forms a large, sticky ball. 

Next, add the coconut oil and the nut butter and blend for a final time. The mixture should be smooth, sticky and doughy, and may even begin to form a doughy ball. It should not be wet or paste-like. You should be able to handle it with your hands and it should hold together when you press or squeeze it.

Finally, roll the mixture into balls, or form into bars (using individual moulds or pressing into a dish or loaf tin and then slicing into individual bars once they have set), and store in the fridge or freezer. I keep some in the fridge for an instant snack, and some in the freezer as they will keep for much longer, and take just seconds to thaw.

Cacao version

Components

50g gluten free oats
100g walnuts (can also use almonds or cashews, or a mixture)
4 tablespoons raw cacao powder
1 teaspoon vanilla powder or extract or vegan or whey protein powder
Pinch of salt
250g medjool dates
50g almond butter (can use other nut butter too)
2 tbs coconut oil

Optional adaptogens: (use one or several of the following, or add your own preferred adaptogens or tonic herbs)
1/4 teaspoon pearl
1/2 teaspoon ashwaganda
1 tablespoons tocorionels
1 tablespoon cacao
1 teaspoon he shou wu, cordyceps, reishi or chaga

Method

Start by blending the oats, walnuts or other nuts, protein powder and adaptogen powders of choice in a food processor, on the highest speed, until they form a fine, flour-like consistency. 

Next, add the dates and then blend again until the mixture becomes doughy and perhaps even forms a large, sticky ball. 

Next, add the coconut oil and the nut butter and blend for a final time. The mixture should be smooth, sticky and doughy, and may even begin to form a doughy ball. It should not be wet or paste-like. You should be able to handle it with your hands and it should hold together when you press or squeeze it.

Finally, roll the mixture into balls, or form into bars (using individual moulds or pressing into a dish or loaf tin and then slicing into individual bars once they have set), and store in the fridge or freezer. I keep some in the fridge for an instant snack, and some in the freezer as they will keep for much longer, and take just seconds to thaw.

Well Being Recipe Series - Lazy Boy Nut Milk

Anytime, Dairy Free, Drinks, Recipe, Vegan, Vegetarian, Well Being Book, Videodanielle coppermanComment

For a quicker way to make your own nut milk, blend 2 tablespoons of nut butter (preferably raw, but roasted will also work) with 150ml filtered water on a high speed for 2–3 minutes. Strain and transfer to a bottle or jar with a lid and store in the fridge for 3–4 days. This will only make about 2 servings, so you might want to double or triple the measurements to make more. Find the full recipe on page 305 of Well Being Book. Get your copy here: http://amzn.to/2jIa3NW

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Summery Vegan Lemon Curd Tart ~ Vegan & Gluten Free Ofc

Dairy Free, Gluten free, Summer, Sugar Free, Sweets + Desserts, Vegan, Vegetarian, Recipedanielle copperman3 Comments
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Ah, this could be just about the dreamiest thing I've ever made. I thought it would be impossible to recreate a favourite of mine (and many's) - The Lemon Tart - using all-natural and vegan ingredients, but it wasn't, and that's why we're where we are today. First off, this post contains around 3 to 4 individual recipes in itself; not only a lemon tart but also a lemon jam, a lemon curd and a biscuity base you can use for all kinds of sweet treats, desserts, freezer granola (I'll explain later) or simply enjoy as a snack. 

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+ You can make this recipe into one big tart to serve sliced (right), or you can use smaller tart dishes to make individual tartlets (left). You can also make this into more a cheesecake pot if you don't have the right kind of tart dish, by filling small ramekins, small bowls or even glasses with some of the base mixture followed by the filling on top.

The Basic Biscuity Base

You can take inspiration from pretty much any recipe for a raw dessert when looking for a quick and simple base for a conventional dessert; whether you intend to make an entirely raw dessert or not. You can make a basic base for any dessert with pretty much any combination of nuts / seeds, coconut oil or butter and a little natural sweetener. I've given up using recipes as it is so easy to judge by eye how much oil and by taste how much sweetener you need to add to any amount of nuts / seeds for it to work as a base. The magic of a raw base like this is that the hard work is done by the coconut oil / butter and the fridge / freezer. It is so simple, and the result is always perfectly crunchy, creamy and crumbly. I use the same kind of recipes as the bottom layer for dessert pots, the base for cheesecakes and as an easy alternative to pastry shells - as I have done here.

+ You could make this tart on a more conventional pastry shell if you feel so inclined / prefer it / have more time and patience on your hands. The pastry from my recent Savoury Vegan Picnic Tartlets recipe would work amazingly with this filling.

Components

Makes enough for 1 medium to large tart dish, or about 8-10 small individual pots / tart dishes

200g raw cashews
200g raw almonds
4 tablespoons coconut oil, melted
3-4 tablespoons honey, medjool dates or other natural sweetener of choice (I find 3 tablespoons is enough to make the dough stick but add more depending on your taste preferences)

+ You can of course use a combination of any other raw nuts and / or seeds you have on hand. I love using pecans or walnuts, and sunflower seeds for a nut-free option.

Process

Simply add your nuts / seeds of choice to a food processor and blend until ground into a fine, crumbly consistency. With the machine still running, slowly pour in the coconut oil followed closly by the honey or other natural sweetener of choice.

The mixture should begin to clump after 30-60 seconds on a high speed. Add a little more oil if the mixture seems too dry and/or a little more honey or sweetener of choice if the mixture isn't sticking and holding together when you press it with your fingers of the back of a spoon or spatula. You want it to stick and hold a compact shape.

Now, cut a strip of baking paper almost twice the diameter of your tart dish (do the same for each small individual tartlet dishes if using). Lay the baking paper across the tart dish as centrally as possible, with the baking paper flat to the middle of the tart dish, and the ends of the laying long outside of the dish. This will help you to lift the tart out once it is set.

Next, transfer the base mixture into your tart dish or tartlet dishes, and use a spatula and / or your hands to spread the mixture evenly to the edges. Press the mixture down until it is compact, and use small handfuls to press some of the mixture up and around the sides of your dish too. 

The base should be about 1/2 cm - 1 cm thick at the base, probably naturally a little thinner around the edges. Transfer to the freezer to set whilst you make the filling.

+ Leftovers tip: You can use any leftover base to energy balls or bars, either rolling it up or pressing into bar moulds or even tuppaware boxes. You can also crumble it into a small container and leave it in the freezer to enjoy as an instant granola for breakfast.

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The Lemon Curd Filling

I have previously made an all-natural lemon curd recipe but it contained eggs and quite a bit of coconut milk which made it quite heavy and rich. This new versions is incredible, I'm genuinely smiling just thinking about it. 100% vegan / plant based and 100% natural and unrefined, you won't find the usual eggs, overload of sugar or butter that is traditionally used in conventional recipes / lemon curd products, or any additives, preservatives and weird thickeners or acidity regulators (err, sorry what?).

As mentioned in the intro, you get 3-in-1 with this recipe. The earliest stage of this filling makes the most delicious lemon jam, which can be used on toast, in yoghurt or enjoyed with baked goods. The next stage makes the perfect lemon curd, which can be used as a spread, a dip or a side for fruit salads or other desserts. And the final stage is your lemon curd tart filling, which could also be used as a slightly richer and creamier spread, dip or side for other desserts. The choice is yours.

Components

140g coconut oil, melted
juice of 6 lemons
160-180g honey, coconut sugar or other natural sweetener of choice
6 tablespoons arrowroot powder
6 tablespoons soy yoghurt (can replace with other yoghurt of choice such as coconut, oat or almond yoghurt. Those who eat dairy can also use probiotic dairy yoghurt or double cream)

Process

Measure the lemon juice, oil and honey into a medium saucepan over a medium - high heat. Immediately whisk in the arrowroot. Add 3 tablespoons first then whisk until fully combine, then add the remaining 3 tablespoons and whisk again.

Heat over a medium - high heat until the mixture begins to thicken and bubble. It should become incredibly gloopy. Also, during one of my test runs, a lot of the oil separated and sat on the surface, but if this happens it will all turn out fine, so don't worry.

As the mixture becomes thick and gloopy, remove the pan from the heat and whisk the mixture vigorously for 1-2 minutes (may need longer if your oil has separated slightly). The mixture should calm down and become a smoother more creamy looking texture. Return to a low-medium heat and simmer for about 10 minutes, whisking every so often to avoid any sticking and burning.

When the mixture is thick, smooth and glossy looking, remove from heat and then whisk in the soy yoghurt (or whichever alternative you might be using), one tablespoon at a time, until smooth. This will make the mixture thin a little but don't worry, it will set perfectly.

Pour the mixture into your tart base or tartlet bases, filling it up to come almost level with the edges of the base. This time, place in the fridge for about 1-2 hours to set fully.

+ Leftovers tip: If you have leftover filling mixture once you've filled your tart or tartlet bases, pour the remainder into a jar or container and store in the fridge. You can serve a dollop alongside the tart for anyone who wants extra, or you can use to accompany breakfasts (such as granola and yoghurt, fruit salad, spread on toast or on porridge) or other desserts.

Once set, slice and serve with an extra dollop of soy yoghurt (or you preferred alternative) and a side of fresh, seasonal fruit. Keeps for 1 week in the fridge. To keep for even longer, slice and store in the freezer; it thaws back to perfection in no time.

+ Decoration tip: You could try swirling an extra dollop of soy yogurt into the middle of the filling before setting, to create a marbled effect. You could also garnish with edible flowers, lemon slices or other fresh fruit of choice

Savoury Vegan Picnic Tartlets

Dairy Free, Dinner, Gluten free, Lunch, Recipe, Seasonal, Snacks, Sugar Free, Vegan, Vegetariandanielle coppermanComment
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Since the sun has finally decided to stay out long enough for the chance of al fresco dining, I've got the perfect recipe to liven up otherwise predictable picnic / barbecue fare. I first tested and shot these recipes in Autumn, hence the roasted grapes, brussels sprouts and chanterelle mushrooms. However, I figured they're still relevant because they're so incredibly customisable. If you've read the introduction of my book you'll know I am all about encouraging people to have a flexible and adaptable approach to cooking. Many people are terrified by this idea, however, I find being open to free-styling in the kitchen is more enjoyable and results in more creative and more personalised dishes.

The gluten free pastry shells in these recipes are the same, and there are two cheesy base options; one made from cashews and the other, a nut-free alternative made with white beans. But the rest of these recipes - the fillings and flavours - are entirely adaptable. Each season, try something new. For now, here are a few summer-inspired suggestions:

Roasted Courgette & Asparagus
Roasted Aubergine & Spinach
Roasted Cabbage & Fennel
Pea & Mint
Roasted Carrot & Garlic
Roasted Tomato & Basil
Or sweet options, with smashed berries, jams / marmalades (ideally homemade / handmade and made with natural ingredients without added sugar or additives) nectarines, figs, apricots and other seasonal fruits.

+ Or for summery alternatives for the below options, simply replace grapes with cherries, brussels with cabbage and chanterelle mushrooms with mushrooms currently in season.

The Basics

Depending on your fillings, I think the easiest way to make these is to start by making the pastry shells and the cream cheese fillings first, setting them aside whilst you prepare your chosen fillings. If roasting your fillings, it may save time to roast the fillings first, whilst you prepare the pastry dough and the cream cheese mixture. If you are not roasting your fillings, I would begin by making the pastry shells first, and preparing your cream cheese mixture and toppings of choice whilst the pastry shells bake.

Makes 1 medium tart, 6 medium - large tartlets, or 10-12 small muffin tin tartlets. The images show medium-large tartlets

The pastry

Components

80g Almond flour
90g buckwheat flour
1/2 tsp Salt
20g coconut oil, room temp (not melted)
1 teaspoon Dried rosemary
5-6 Tbsp Cold water
Sesame or onion seeds - optional

Process

Preheat the oven to 170c.

In a medium mixing bowl, use a spatula to combine all of  the dry ingredients.

Next, add the oil and mash and stir using a fork to form a crumbly texture.

Next, gradually add the water. Add 4 tablespoons first and then 1-2 more tablespoons if the mixture seems too dry or crumbly and isn't forming into a dough easily.

Once doughy, form into a compact ball and then break into sections, depending on how many tart trays you are using and depending on the size of them. Grease the trays lightly with a little coconut oil and then press the mixture down firmly into each tin, spreading evenly along the base and pressing up the sides too. The mixture should be around 5mm thick.

Place the pastry shells into the preheated oven and bake for 10-12 mins, until beginning to brown. Leave to cool before filling.

The Cashew Cream Cheese

Components

120g Soaked Cashews
40ml Water
12g Nutritional yeast
Salt
Pepper
1/2 tsp Apple cider vinegar
1 tsp Lemon juice
5 tablespoons Olive oil

Process

Combine all the cashew cheese ingredients in a high speed blender and blend for 2-3 minutes until smooth. Pour into a bowl or container and set aside or chill in the fridge whilst you prepare the fillings.

The white bean cream cheese

Components

1 tin white beans (200g drained weight)
50ml extra virgin olive oil
1⁄2 teaspoons natural salt
2 tablespoons nutritional yeast
1⁄4 teaspoons lemon juice
1⁄4 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
20g coconut oil (melted) or extra olive oil
2 tablespoons hot water

Simply add all the ingredients to your blender and blend until smooth. Transfer to a bowl or container and set aside or chill in the fridge until needed. 

Assembling the tarts

Roasted grape, brussels and hazelnut with cashew cream cheese

8-10 large brussels sprouts (or chopped cabbage)
200g red grapes, roasted (could also use fresh figs)
A pinch of fresh rosemary - to garnish
Hazelnuts or walnuts - to garnish

Process

Preheat the oven to 200c.

Slice the brussels into quarters, lengthways - so you have a few discs rather than wedges. Pierce the grapes as best you can with the tip of a sharp knife and then place in a baking tray, keeping the grapes and brussels at separate ends if possible. Drizzle with olive oil and salt and then bake for 45 minutes, until they begin to shrink and soften.

Remove from the oven and allow to cool before assembling into the base of your pastry shells and before topping with your cashew or white bean cream cheese mixture.

When ready to assemble, simply place a few teaspoons of the roasted grapes and brussels into the base of your pastry shell, then top with your cashew or white bean cream cheese mixture. Smooth the mixture and then top with extra roasted grapes and / or brussels. 

Serve immediately or allow to cool and store in an airtight container in the fridge until ready to enjoy.

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Chanterelle & garlic with white bean cream cheese

Components

200g chanterelle mushrooms (or other mushrooms), sliced
4-6 whole or chopped cloves of garlic
2 tablespoons olive or coconut oil
1 tablespoon miso (optional)

Add the oil to a saucepan and once heated, add the garlic. When the garlic begins to brown, add the mushrooms and miso and stir to combine. Sauté over a medium heat for about 10-15 minutes, until the mushrooms begin to soften and the mixture begins to caramelise.

Allow to cool slightly before assembling into your pastry shells and before topping with your cashew or white bean cream cheese mixture.

When ready to assemble, simply place a few teaspoons of the mushroom and garlic mixture into the base of your pastry shell, then top with your cashew or white bean cream cheese mixture. Smooth the mixture and then top with extra sauteed mushrooms and garlic mixture and / or nuts, seeds or herbs of choice. 

Serve immediately or allow to cool and store in an airtight container in the fridge until ready to enjoy.

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Hola Pokē ~ For Womens Health

Commisions, Lunch, Dinner, Recipe, Vegetarian, Vegandanielle coppermanComment
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HOW TO MAKE A POKE BOWL

If you don't live near the capital, the good news is it's simple to make your own poke bowl at home.

Freestyle it and throw together your favourite poke bowl ingredients, aiming for a variety of textures and flavours, and serve. Salmon, tuna, avocado, mango, pineapple, sesame seeds… the opportunities are endless.

Copy this for your Masterchef moment:

HOW TO MAKE DANIELLE COPPERMAN'S POKE BOWL

More a traditional recipe kinda gal and want to read your poke recipe, rather than watch it? Try Danielle Copperman's Hang Loose Poke style bowl. Perfect for summer evenings and lunches on the go. More healthy recipes are available in her cookbook, Well Being, £14.40, amazon.com.

Hang Loose Pokē-Style Ocean Bowl

Serves 4

Poke ingredients:

250g brown rice, black rice, quinoa or millet

100g edamame beans

40g kale, spinach or broccoli, raw or steamed

1 avocado

Pinch of Himalayan pink salt

1 tsp lemon juice

100g grated carrot, beetroot or radishes

1 portion Quickled cucumber (page 316 of Well Being)

1 portion Pickled ginger (page 316 of Well Being)

2 tbsp sesame seeds

For the seaweed salad

15g dried hijiki or arame

1 tbsp tamari

1 tsp rice or apple cider vinegar

1⁄2–1 tsp sesame oil

1⁄4–1⁄2 tsp honey (optional)

1⁄4 tsp grated fresh ginger

2 tbsp sesame seeds

For the marinated enoki mushrooms

200g enoki, shiitake, chestnut or portobello mushrooms

3 tbsp rice vinegar

1 tbsp extra virgin olive, sesame or coconut oil

2 tsp apple cider vinegar

4 tbsp water

2 tbsp coconut sugar

2 tbsp tamari

1⁄2 tsp grated fresh ginger

1 tbsp fresh coriander leaves

For the baked nori crisps

6 sheets dried nori

2 tbsp sesame oil

Pinch of sea salt

1 tbsp sesame seeds

Danielle Copperman Poke BOWL

Poke method:

1. Fill a saucepan with water and bring to the boil. Add the edamame beans and cook for 10–15 minutes, then drain (reserving the water), transfer to a small bowl, and set aside.

2. Return the reserved cooking liquid to the pan and bring to the boil again.

3. Add the kale, spinach, broccoli or other greens and cook for 5–8 minutes until the leaves are wilted or the broccoli begins to soften but still has some bite.

4. Slice the avocado in half, remove the stone and then score the flesh either into cubes or thin slices, lengthways. Scoop the flesh into a small serving bowl, sprinkle with salt, drizzle with lemon juice and then place in the fridge until ready to serve.

5. For the baked nori crisps, cut the nori sheets into sixths, to make six small rectangles. Place on a baking tray, brush with sesame oil and then sprinkle with the sesame seeds and a pinch of salt. Bake for 15–20 minutes, until crisp and crunchy.

6. For the seaweed salad, soak the seaweed in a bowl of water for 10–15 minutes, until it has tripled in size. Meanwhile, whisk together the remaining ingredients in a small bowl. Drain the seaweed and rinse it under cold water, then add it to the dressing and mix or massage the seaweed in with your hands to coat with the dressing and top with sesame seeds. Place in the fridge until ready to serve.

7. For the marinated mushrooms, place all the mushroom ingredients in a small saucepan, bring to the boil and then simmer for 10–20 minutes, until the mushrooms soften and the sauce thickens. Transfer to a bowl and place in the fridge until ready to serve.

8. When all your components are ready, divide the cooked rice or grain among four bowls. Tuck the edamame beans into one corner of each bowl. Do the same with the grated vegetables, greens, avocado, marinated mushrooms and Quickled Cucumber, and finally arrange the seaweed salad in the centre of the bowl.

9. Serve the Pickled Ginger on the side and either serve the nori crisps on the side or tuck 1 or 2 into each bowl. This recipe is vegetarian but I’d encourage adding either fresh sashimi, smoked salmon, cooked fish or seafood, soft-boiled eggs for a truer pokē experience.

Read the full article here.

Meat-free Mushroom & Walnut 'Meatballs'

Vegetarian, Vegan, Dinner, Recipe, Gluten freedanielle coppermanComment

I've never been much of a meatball eater, but for some reason I felt drawn to try my hand at a meat-free version of them this week. Although I occasionally eat meat (only really chicken and fish), I love discovering dishes that use innovative plant-based ingredients to replicate meaty or meat-based products. Whilst I don't mind tofu or tempeh, nothing feels as rewarding or tastes as good as using fresh ingredients in their whole form to make something entirely new and innovative from scratch. For this, I turn to mushrooms. Their rich, earthy and meaty flavour and juiciness add a deep flavour to any dish they are used in, and I find they make offer a really flavoursome alternative to meat, unlike tofu and tempeh which don't taste of much at all. 

These mushroom 'meatballs' are full of flavour (with the help of fresh and dried herbs) and cook to the perfect texture; juicy and chewy in the middle, crisp on the outside. I stirred them through an simple homemade basil and tomato pasta sauce and served them with gluten free spaghetti, but you could also use shop-bought sauces, red or green pesto or serve them with your favourite homemade sauce. I've left recipes for homemade passata and sundried tomato pesto from my book, below.

Components

Makes 10-12 'meatballs', serving 2-4 portions

300g chestnut or button mushrooms, sliced (you can use a selection of any kind of mushroom - portobello would also be nice)
50g walnuts (can also use other nuts or seeds such as almonds or pumpkin seeds)
50g gluten free oats
8 tablespoons ground almonds
50g sun dried tomatoes
1 handful fresh spinach
1 egg, whisked (you can omit this for a vegan option; the recipe will still work without it)
1 garlic clove (optional)
About 1 tablespoon fresh rosemary
A few leaves of fresh basil
1/2 teaspoon dried herbs (I like oregano and thyme)
4 tablespoons buckwheat flour (or other gluten free flour)
2 tablespoons ground flaxseeds or ground chia (optional)
1 teaspoon tamari (optional)
Pinch of salt (you could use celery salt if you have it)
2-3 tablespoons coconut or olive oil, for frying and greasing

Elevate it
20g Black or green olives
1/2 teaspoon Reishi powder
1/2 teaspoon Shilajit powder

Method

Preheat the oven to 180c.

Start by slicing the mushrooms a few times lengthways and then cut them in half down the middle. In a frying pan, fry the mushrooms and garlic (if using) in 1-2 tablespoons of your chosen oil. Fry for around 5-10 minutes until the mushrooms soften and begin to brown and caramelise slightly. Meanwhile, start making the base for the 'meatballs'.

Measure the walnuts and oats into a food processor and pulse until they become a flour-like consistency. Add the ground almonds, sun dried tomatoes, spinach, egg, fresh rosemary, fresh basil, dried herbs of choice, tamari (if using), ground flaxseeds or chia (if using) and a pinch of salt and blend again until the mixture forms a thick paste. 

Once the mushrooms are done, transfer just over half of them to the food processor, and reserve the remainder on a chopping board to cool. Blend a final time, for about 30 seconds, until the mushrooms combine into the paste. Scrape the mixture into a medium mixing bowl.

Dice the remaining mushrooms into small chunks and stir them through the pastey mixture. Then add the buckwheat flour (or other gluten free flour) and stir with a spatula or wooden spoon to combine.

Grease a baking tray with a little oil and then form the mixture into small balls, the same size you'd expect from a standard meatball. Place them a little apart on the baking tray.

Place in the preheated oven and bake for 30-35 minutes, until brown and crisp on the outside. 

Add the 'meatballs' to your desired sauce or serve as you wish. They are quite falafel-like, so could also be enjoyed added to salads or served with houmous as a snack.

+ Alternatively, you could flatten these into burger shapes and either bake in the oven or throw on the barbecue. Give it a try and let me know how it goes.

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Sun Dried Tomato Pesto

Components

80g sun dried tomatoes
60g fresh tomatoes (any size, roughly chopped)
1 handful fresh basil leaves
80ml extra virgin olive oil
50g almonds or cashews
1 tsp lemon juice or 1⁄4 tsp apple cider vinegar
1 crushed garlic clove
2 tbsp nutritional yeast
pinch of salt
pepper

Method

Blend the sundried tomatoes, fresh tomatoes, fresh basil, olive oil, nuts of choice, lemon juice or apple cider vinegar, garlic, nutritional yeast and salt in a high speed blender or food processor until smooth but still slightly chunky. If you'd prefer a smoother consistency, simply blend for longer until you are happy with it. Season further, to taste.

Roasted Red Pepper & Tomato Passata

Serves 2-4

2 red peppers, chopped
4 medium tomatoes, chopped
1⁄2 white onion or shallot, chopped
1–2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
60ml water or stock (or unsweetened plant- based milk) 
2 tbsp nutritional yeast
handful of fresh basil leaves
1⁄2 red chilli, finely chopped (optional)
Pinch of salt
Ground black pepper

Method

Arrange the red peppers, tomatoes, onion and garlic on a baking tray, drizzle with a little olive oil and sprinkle with a pinch of salt. Roast for 25–30 minutes, until the vegetables become soft and the peppers begin to darken at the edges. Heat 1 tablespoon of the extra virgin olive oil in a saucepan over a medium heat. Once hot, add the chilli, if using, and sauté for 4–5 minutes. Add half the roasted vegetables. Put the remaining vegetables in a blender, add the water or stock and nutritional yeast and blend on a high speed for 20–30 seconds, until smooth. Pour into the pan with the chilli and whole roasted vegetables and heat through. Season to taste. When you are happy with the flavour, either add the cooked pasta to the pan to coat it in the sauce, or divide your pasta among bowls and pour the sauce over the top. Garnish with basil, a drizzle of the remaining extra virgin olive oil and an extra sprinkle of salt and pepper. Add black olives, flaked tuna or anchovies and spinach to the sauce for a puttanesca-style pasta dish.

Honeyed Miso Puy Lentil, Beetroot + Walnut Salad

Dinner, Gluten free, Recipe, Vegetarian, Winterdanielle coppermanComment

I experimented with this recipe a few weeks ago when I was really feeling for something warm, earthy, grounding and comforting. I'm not always in the mood for pulses as I find lentils, chickpeas and beans quite starchy and rich, but sometimes something within me really craves something within them; perhaps protein, perhaps their many other vitamins or minerals, or perhaps even their association with certain chakras. Lentils (reddish/brown or generally dark in colour, like puy or beluga) are thought to help sooth and support the root chakra, and in some cases (usually depending on their colour) are believed to open up the heart chakra (green lentils) and solar plexus chakra (yellow lentils).

This dish is best served warm but can also be enjoyed cold, as a side or stirred through salads. I made this with friends and, although I don't tend to eat dairy, or animal milk products in general, we made an option with fresh, organic goats cheese. If you are vegan or, like me, avoid animal milk products, of course you can easily leave it out, or replace it with vegan cheese, sauteed tofu or tempeh, grilled or sautéd paprika smoked cauliflower, houmous or a spoonful of coconut milk or coconut yoghurt, or anything else you fancy that adds a similar kind of tangy, saltiness to counter the subtle sweetness of the dish.

COMPONENTS

200g puy lentils, cooked and strained
2 small beetroots
1 teaspoon brown miso paste
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
3 teaspoons organic / raw honey (or other natural sweetener of choice)
1 teaspoon nutritional yeast
2 teaspoons lemon juice
A few drops of apple cider vinegar
1-2 chopped dates (could also use raisins or dried apricots)
Salt + pepper, as desired

To Top (optional)
A handful of raw walnuts
1/2 teaspoon walnut oil
A pinch of fresh lemon thyme, thyme, majoram, rosemary or other fresh herbs - to top

PROCESS

If you've got raw lentils, start by cooking them as per the packet ingredients, for roughly 20-30 minutes (ideally in stock rather than plain water - and even better - if you have time - soak them for a few hours before cooking).

Once the lentils are cooked, or if you are using pre-coked puy lentils, measure them into a medium saucepan with the olive oil and set over a medium heat.

Add the chopped beetroot, nutritional yeast, miso, honey, lemon juice, apple cider vinegar and chopped dates and sauté for 5-10 minutes, until all of the ingredients are combined and everything is coated evenly.

Taste and season by adding more nutritional yeast, miso, honey and / or lemon juice to suit you preferences. Season further with a little salt and pepper as desired.

Transfer to a serving bowl or distribute into individual bowls and top with a drizzle of walnut oil, the chopped walnuts, fresh herbs of choice and goats cheese or other alternative - if using.

Finish with an extra drizzle of extra virgin olive or walnut oil, honey or lemon juice (or for extra flavour, make a double portion of the miso-honey dressing, and drizzle on top or serve on the side).

Enjoy this as a side dish to main meals, or with other vegetables. We enjoyed it with roasted cauliflower and broccoli and baked salmon. You could, of course, eat it alone as it is a filling and nutritionally dense dish as it is.

Well Being Recipe Series - Salted Vanilla + Walnut Smoothie

Video, Breakfast, Drinks, Recipe, Vegan, Vegetarian, Wake Up Well, Well Being Bookdanielle coppermanComment

This recipe can be found in the Morntime section of my book, on page 63, and is one of my go-to smoothies all year round. Nut-rich without being heavy on the digestive system, it is simplified nourishment at its most delicious. I love starting the day with a liquid as less energy is used up on the body's digestive processes (meaning more energy can be allocated to other functions), and nutrients are delivered, received, sorted and absorbed even more quickly and efficiently than solid food.

This smoothie is super creamy and is more like a milkshake. It is high in protein, fibre, healthy fats and antioxidants, and contains beautifying ingredients responsible for glowing skin (such as walnuts, almonds and maca).

In the book, the recipe contains avocado flesh too, and the ice is added halfway through the blending process, but I forgot the avocado this time and blended the ice with the other ingredients. Both turn out pretty much the same.

Serves 1

Components

200ml filtered water or plant-based milk
100g banana, sliced and frozen
2 tbsp avocado flesh (optional)
30g raw walnuts
20g tahini or nut butter (I used almond) 
20g raw almonds (with or without skin) 
1⁄2 tsp ground cinnamon
2g vanilla powder
2 tbsp hemp seeds or linseeds (also known as flaxseeds)
1 tsp maca powder
0.5–1g salt
1 medjool date
6–8 ice cubes 

Elevate it with:
Adaptogen powders suited to your current mood / needs
1/2 teaspon chia seeds
1/2 teaspoon charcoal powder
Small handful of fresh spinach

Process

Measure all of the ingredients into your blender. 

Blend on a medium speed for 1-2 minutes, until smooth.

Serve instantly.

Well Being book is out now - get your copy here.

Not another cookbook - Well Being Book Announcement

Anytime, Gluten free, Dairy Free, Lifestyle, Natural Living, Movement, Rituals, Vegan, Vegetarian, Wellbeing, Well Being Bookdanielle coppermanComment
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The time has finally come for me to reveal the release of my debut book, Well Being: a collection of recipes and rituals to realign the body and mind. Below is a brief breakdown of what's to come, and if there's anything else you want to know, leave a question in the comments or ask me via email.

I have been manifesting this book for years and finally started working on it in 2016. I then spent pretty much all of 2017 planning, writing and shooting its contents and, 10 months later, it's a real life book that you can buy and hold and read. Life is crazy.

The book contains natural recipes and rituals inspired by ancient traditions and aimed at realigning the body and mind to restore balance within, both mentally and physically. It contains rituals and other practices aimed at undoing the damage of side effects of modern life - such as stress, depression, low energy, lack of sleep, poor digestion, and much more.

Well Being is a combination of the most valued rituals and recipes I have discovered over the years, since embarking on my journey of eating healthily and living well. Each section contains rituals to help reduce stress, ease digestive issues and encourage a sense of balance, calm and clarity, followed by recipes made with entirely natural ingredients, designed with each stage of the day in mind. Morntime rituals and recipes energise the body and mind, Daytime rituals and recipes enhance productivity, In Between Time rituals and recipes encourage concentration and focus, Evening Time rituals and recipes aim to refuel and Nighttime rituals and recipes aim to encourage relaxation and deep sleep. 

Offering a collection of recipes and rituals to realign the body and mind, inspired by nature, modern-day needs and a variety of age old traditions from wellbeing systems from all over the world, the book combines all-natural, carefully considered recipes with simple rituals, each of which are tailored to specific times of the day, underpinned by the common interest in reducing the stresses of modern day life. Its main intentions are to reduce stress, improve digestion, enhance energy levels, improve sleep, enhance concentration, strengthen immunity, encourage positivity and reverse the effects of illness - all by understanding and utilising the power of natures healing ingredients and the potential of your own body and mind.

With over 200 recipes, 60 rituals and 30 recipes for beauty and home remedies, Well Being is a versatile and easy-to-use handbook for anyone, anytime, anywhere. It will guide you through each stage of the day and provides advice and education to help you to fine-tune the fundamental foundations of wellbeing, to personalise them and to curate an individualised set of guidelines you truly understand and enjoy enough to sustain them. It will guide you through your ever-changing journey with flexible and adaptable information rather than restrictive rules or extreme, quick-fix methods.

MAIN FEATURES

Official release date: January 4th 2018

Over 200 food recipes

Over 60 rituals

Over 30 recipes for beauty remedies and home solutions

The book is divided into five main sections: Morntime, Daytime, In Between Time, Evening Time and Nightime. Each is then subdivided into rituals and recipes

The recipes are mostly plant-based although some contain eggs, and there are suggestions to include meat or other animal products in certain recipes, depending on your dietary choices / requirements. The recipes in the book are adaptable and don't fall under any official label or systems, reinforcing that no single diet works for every one and that the keys to adopting sustainable lifestyle habits is responsibility, understanding, individualisation and flexibility.

The book includes a detailed introduction to the more 'buzzy' ingredients I tend to include in my recipes, such as adaptogens and tonic herbs, and these are always included in an 'elevate it' section of the ingredients list, rather than standing at the forefront of a recipe. The foundations of the recipes in this book are all accessible, easy to come by ingredients. 

How-to recipes for daily goods (including how to make 2 minute almond milk, coconut yoghurt, sauerkraut, buckwheat pasta, almond pasta, bagels, breads, pickles and quickles, chutneys, nut butters and other spreads, stocks and broths from scratch) that guarantee consistent and effortless cooking at your fingertips.

Follow @dcopperman and #WellBeingBook to explore more about the book or to get involved once you have your copy ;)

Cauliflower coconut soup

Dairy Free, Dinner, Lunch, Recipe, Vegan, Vegetarian, Winterdanielle coppermanComment
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Whilst the rest of the world is apparently into blending cauliflower into smoothies, I'm keeping it savoury and, IMO, just as it should be, by blending it into a soup. To be honest though, you could definitely get away with adding some frozen banana and extra liquid to this for a sweet, creamy smoothie - if that's your jam give it a go and let me know how that turns out for you.

I've always been big into soup and this time of year its not only perfectly fulfilling simplified nourishment, it's also warming and comforting - two very important factors when its snowing outside and you're back at home for Christmas with parents who like to ration the heating regardless. This recipe is so simple, and blending roasted cauliflower with rich coconut milk makes for the creamiest end result. To be honest, you could use pretty much any vegetables in place of or as well as cauliflower. I don't tend to like potatoes in soups as they become too thick and starchy for my liking, but by all means add them in if you want to bulk it out a little. I think it would work well with sweet potato too, but i'll let you be the judge of that.

Nutrition: Cauliflower is highly detoxifying and cleansing and is known to improve digestion. As always, these nutritional benefits are general, and this may not ring true with you. I personally find cauliflower often affects my digestion for the worst, but I occasionally eat it anyway. The point is that unless the rest of your lifestyle is aligned and balanced, your digestion is not going to become flawless as a result of one individual ingredient. Cauliflower is also thought to be high in essential vitamins and minerals, however, depending on many other aspects of our individual lifestyles, these vitamins and minerals may not be bioavailable for all of us. Don't eat this purely for its nutritional promises, enjoy it and if it makes you feel good, enjoy it again, and again and again.

+ I don't cook with onion or garlic as I have mild sensitivities to both, which is why they are included here as 'optional'. I don't personally feel they are essential for adding flavour do this dish, but if you'd prefer, roughly follow the below measurements. 

Components

Serves 2

4 tablespoons olive oil, coconut oil or ghee
200g cauliflower (can also half this quantity and use 100g potato, sweet potato, celeriac or other vegetables of choice)
1 tin coconut milk
300ml vegetable stock
2 tablespoons nutritional yeast
A few sprigs of fresh thyme, lemon thyme or rosemary
Salt + pepper, to taste
2 cloves garlic - ideally roasted whole for a more smoky flavour, or if not raw and crushed
1 small - medium white onion, chopped
50g chickpeas (optional)
1/2 teaspoon apple cider vinegar (optional)
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon (optional)

Process

Preheat the oven to 200-220c. 
Slice the cauliflower into individual florets and any difficult areas to cut, just slice into smaller, flatter pieces. Place in a large bowl and add 3 tablespoons of oil and a pinch of salt. Toss in the oil to cover and then pour out and arrange onto a baking tray.
Roast for 35-45 minutes.

Once the cauliflower begins to brown and soften, remove from the oven. If using garlic or onion, heat the remaining oil in a medium saucepan over a medium heat and add both, stirring continuously for 4-5 minutes until they begin to brown. 
Transfer the cauliflower to a high speed blender and add the garlic and onion, if using. Add the remaining oil if you didn't use it to cook the garlic and onion, along with the stock, nutritional yeast and fresh herbs of choice. If you're using chickpeas, add those now, along with the apple cider vinegar and cinnamon, if using. 

Blend on a medium to high speed for 1-2 minutes until smooth, then transfer to a medium saucepan over a medium heat. Add the coconut milk and season to taste, then heat through and serve instantly.

Top with a drizzle of olive oil, flax oil, chia oil or avocado oil or add a knob of coconut oil or ghee.
Drizzle with raw honey or wheatgrass oil (see below).
Top with savoury qnola, hemp seeds and crushed nuts.

+ You can also use this soup chilled as a dressing for salads or as a hot or cold dip for vegetables or bread.
+ You can also stir it through pasta as a creamy pasta sauce. Simply add it to a pan of cooked pasta, heat through, and serve with an extra sprinkle of nutritional yeast, or cheese if you aren't vegan or dairy intolerant.
+ You can also turn this into a risotto-style dish by simply adding cooked brown rice, quinoa, buckwheat or millet to the soup and cooking until the grains absorb some of the liquid.

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Wheatgrass Oil

Components

1 teaspoon wheatgrass powder (can also use spirulina)
5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil (or other oil such as nut, chia or avocado oil)
Salt and pepper, to taste
Adaptogen powders of choice (optional) (i like pine pollen or he shou wu)

Process

Simply add all of the ingredients to a small measuring jug, a mug, a glass or a jar and whisk with a fork or a small whisk if you have one. Season to taste the drizzle over the soup or use on salads, vegetables and to top other meals.

 

Cinnamon Spiced Pecan Butter

Anytime, Seasonal, Vegan, Vegetarian, Winter, Recipe, Autumndanielle coppermanComment

In recent years, and especially as I become more in tune with nature, I have come to really notice a difference in all aspects of my life as the seasons shift. I don't spend too much time thinking about it, but when I stop to acknowledge my dietary patterns, cravings, thoughts, feelings, moods, emotions, body temperature and other physical and mental adjustments, I notice that most of them are changing in sync with the weather, the moon phases and the elemental adjustments of each season. Typically, pecans - although nowadays not especially seasonal as they are available pretty much all year round - are harvested from late September through to the end of November. Traditional Chinese Medicine teaches that nuts are warming and hot in nature and so eating nuts during Autumn and Winter is thought to help to keep us warm, internally. With their healthy fats, high protein content and abundance of vitamins and minerals, most nuts are known to nourish and strengthen the kidneys, the brain and the heart, which all need a little extra attention during the colder months as we become more  susceptible to illness.

This pecan and cinnamon butter is so simple yet highly effective, both nutritionally and energetically speaking. Cinnamon, a spice associated with the Fire element (which is the element of confidence and action, and which helps to cleanse and protect) adds extra warmth to this recipe, as well as adding aromas that can reduce fatigue and drowsiness - common side-effects of seasonal transitions into colder, darker climes. I've been enjoying this by the spoonful, stirred through breakfast bowls (such as Qnola and coconut yoghurt, chia seed porridge and smoothie bowls) and added to smoothies, tonics and adaptogen lattes. It's also delicious used as a dressing or blended into other dressings for savoury meals.

PROCESS

1. Preheat the oven to 160c. Spread the pecans evenly on a flat baking tray and once the oven is warm, place on a middle rack. Leave to toast for 10-12 minutes, until they begin to darken in colour and become aromatic.

2. Remove from the oven and transfer immediately to a food processor. Pulse for a minimum of 5 minutes on highest speed, stopping the machine to scrape down the sides, as required. The length of time required for the nuts to bind a liquified 'butter' will depend on the strength of your food processor. If necessary, pulse for up to 12 minutes until smooth.

3. Transfer to a jar or other pot and enjoy, or store in the fridge for up to 2 months.

COMPONENTS

200g raw pecans
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon vanilla powder, paste, extract or seeds from a pod
½ teaspoon Maca (optional)
Pinch of salt (himalayan pink or sea)

SIMPLE SWEET POTATO CANAPES

Sides, Snacks, Sugar Free, Vegan, Vegetarian, Lunch, Recipe, Gluten free, Dinner, Dips + Spreads, Dairy Freedanielle coppermanComment

This recipe has been in my drafts for over a year now. I first experimented with it last December, and it was one of the first things I made on returning from two months living in New York, and living without much in the way of a kitchen. It was fun.

I love sweet potato. It actually concerns me more when someone says they don't like sweet potato than when someone says they dont like chocolate. There's nothng not to like, and there are so many ways you can use them. Roasted. Made into chips. Blended into desserts, baked good and other puddings. Added to smoothies. Curry. Risotto. You can literally do anything with them and they are pretty low maintenance. This recipe is super easy and is an effortlessly impressive option for a dinner party, a canape spread, a starter, a snack or a simple side.

INGREDIENTS

2 Medium Sweet Potatoes (preferably long and thin) (can also substitute for plain potatoes)
Coconut Oil or Extra Virgin Olive Oil
Himalayan Pink Salt
Fresh Thyme

TOPPINGS OPTIONS
Nut or Seed Butter (almond, cashew, sesame, macadamia, pecan, hazelnut)
White Bean Cream Cheese (Recipe Below
Homemade Cacao Chocolate Sauce
Avocado Cacao Chocolate Spread
Other spreads or condiments of choice

ELEVATE IT

Elevate this recipe with the adition of one or a selection of the following superfood and adaptogen powders:
Reishi
Turmeric
Shilajit
Cacao Powder
Wheatgrass
Beetroot Powder
Cinnamon
Sumac
Ginger
Charcoal

+ Sprinkle on top of the finished individual sweet potato discs and toppings, or blend into your chosen toppings.

METHOD

Preheat the oven to 200c and line 2 baking trays with baking paper.
Start by washing and scrubbing the sweet potatoes, but don't peel them. Slice into thin discs discs (as shown in the photographs) - preferably no thicker than 0.5mm in height. Arrange on the prepared trays, drizzle or brush each one with a very small amount of olive oil, and sprinkle with the thyme and a little salt. Bake for 40-50 minutes - flipping halfway through - until the rounds begin to brown. Whilst they bake, make the white bean cream cheese, or prepare your own other choice of toppings.

WHITE BEAN CREAM CHEESE

INGREDIENTS

1 Tin White Beans (200g drained weight)
1/4 Cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1/2 Teaspoon Salt
1-2 Teaspoons Nutritional Yeast
1/4 Teaspoon Lemon Juice
1/2 - 1 Garlic Clove (optional not essential)
A Few Drops Apple Cider Vinegar

METHOD

Simply place all of the cream cheese ingredients into a blender and blend on a high speed. Scrape down the sides and add a little more oil or some water if the mixture is too thick and needs some help blending smoothly. Blend for at least 2 minutes until smooth and creamy.

Once the sweet potato discs begin to brown and crisp up slightly (they will become crispier as they cool) transfer to a cooling rack. If serving warm, top immediately with your choice of toppings, or store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 days before serving.

+ For savoury options using the white bean cream cheese, top with your choice of hemp seeds, linseeds and / or chia seeds, Savoury Qnola, greens (such as kale, spinach or fresh herbs), smoked salmon or flaked fish, shredded meat, chopped raw or roasted nuts and / or seeds, grapes, cranberries or other seasonal fruits, chopped or crumbled chestnuts and anything else you're in the mood for.

+ For sweet options using nut butter, tahini, chocolate spread or other sweet spreads / condiments, top with hemp seeds, linseeds and / or chia seeds, sweet Qnola, granola or other sweet cereals, fresh or dried fruits, desiccated coconut, cacao nibs or raw chocolate chunks, fresh herbs or spices, chopped raw or roasted nuts and / or seeds, chopped or crumbled chesnuts and anything else that suits your tastes.
 

YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THESE CHESTNUT BROWNIES

Seasonal, Snacks, Sugar Free, Vegan, Vegetarian, Recipe, Gluten free, Dairy Freedanielle coppermanComment

So, although it's practically sunbathing weather compared to most Decembers in the UK, winter is coming, and more importantly, (in the words of Coca Cola) the holidays are coming. Silently, alongside public Christmas light displays, Starbucks' red cups and pumpkins and chestnuts filling my local grocery store, winter is unfolding and I have an underlying suspicion that it's just gonna come out of nowhere and hit me in the face with blue lips, frozen toes (no matter how strong my sock game), and some seasonal illness for good measure. My response will be these seasonal brownie bites, inspired by the abundance of chestnuts this time of year - definitely not one of those ingredients you come across in a recipe that makes you think 'where on earth?!'.

These brownie bites are perfect as a sugar-free snack with full-on chocolate vibes during the winter, and would be well received making an appearance at duvet days, movie nights, cocktail or dinner parties, wrapped as a gift to give or kept in the freezer when the boxes of Celebrations and balls of Chocolate Orange begin to get a bit much.

INGREDIENTS

makes 8- 10 small brownies or 1 dish around 9 x 5 in

FOR THE CHESTNUT BROWNIE LAYER

170g medjool dates
80g chestnuts
90g raw almonds
70g raw walnuts
20-25g raw cacao powder
25g coconut oil - melted
2 Tablespoons chia seeds
1/4 Teaspoons Himalayan pink salt
10g coconut palm sugar or natural sweetener of choice - optional

ELEVATE IT

1/2 Teaspoon of some or all of the following:
He Shou Wu Powder / Maca Powder / Chaga Powder / Reishi / Shilajit / Cordycepts / Mucuna / Ashwaganda

FOR THE CHESTNUT CARAMEL LAYER

100g chestnuts
2 tablespoons almond butter or tahini
25g coconut oil - melted
65g dates
½ teaspoon vanilla
¼ cup plant milk or water
1 teaspoon honey, coconut syrup or other unrefined sweetener of your choice
1 tablespoon maca

FOR THE CHOCOLATE LAYER

250g cacao butter (or coconut oil) (can also use half cacao butter + half coconut oil)
150g raw cacao powder
40ml coconut syrup or other unrefined sweetener of choice
Pinch of Himalayan pink salt

+ Can also use store-bought dark or raw chocolate bars. I like Ombar.

METHOD

Start by making the brownie layer. place the almonds, walnuts and chia seeds into a food processor and blend until they form a flour like consistency, similar to breadcrumbs. next, add the chestnuts and blend again for 30 seconds. then add the dates, cacao powder, coconut oil, himalayan pink salt and coconut sugar, if using. blend for 30 seconds to 1 minute, until the mixture comes together to in a slightly sticky dough-like consistency. make sure the mixture is smooth and that there are no large chunks of nuts involved, as this recipe tastes so much better when the mixture is completely smooth.

Once blended, either place into a cupcake or mini loaf tin tray (i use this one) or into a standard loaf tin or baking tray (around 9 x 5 in). Using trays with individual mini sections will be easier to handle, but you can use a larger tray and simply cut into individual pieces once set. Whichever you use, spread the mixture on the bottom of the tray/tray sections, making it about 1 to 1.5 cm in height. Place in the freezer to set.

Whilst the brownie layer sets, make the chestnut caramel layer. In a cleaned food processor or your blender, pulse the chestnuts for 20 seconds until they begin to break down into small pieces. Add the dates, almond butter or tahini, coconut oil, vanilla, syrup of choice and maca, if using and then continue to blend until smooth - about 1-2 minutes should do it.

Once the bottom layer is beginning to set and firm to touch, spread the chestnut caramel layer on top until the entire base is covered. Smooth evenly to ensure a more level finish to coat with the raw chocolate.

Return to the freezer and set for about 1-2 hours, or overnight. Unfortunately this step is necessary in order to easily coat the brownies in the chocolate layer. If you can't wait, follow the following step for drizzling the melted chocolate over the bars instead of dipping the bars into it.

Once set, start making the chocolate. Leave the brownies in the freezer until you have made the chocolate. bring a small pan of water to the boil and then set a heatproof bowl over the top. Add the cacao powder, cacao butter or coconut oil (or combination of both), salt and sweetener of choice to the bowl and whisk as the mixture melts together. Once combined, remove from the heat but leave the bowl over the water to avoid the chocolate cooling and thickening too quickly.

Remove the brownies from the freezer and remove from the tins carefully with a knife or cake slice. If you used a large dish, slice into desired sizes. Set each individual brownie onto a cooling rack with a layer of baking paper on the surface underneath the rack. One by one, add a brownie to the chocolate mixture and, working quickly, use a fork to turn the brownies through the mixture until fully coated. *You could alternatively keep the brownies on the rack and pour or spread the chocolate mixture over them, but I find this method a little messier. Sprinkle each one with chopped pecans or hazelnuts, Qnola or himalayan pink salt before the chocolate has fully set. You can also experiment with drizzling a second layer of chocolate over the smooth chocolate layer, and if you have leftover chocolate you could double dip, for a thicker, crunchier outer coating.

If the cooling rack fits, place it in your fridge or freezer once each brownie has been coated. If it doesn't fit, wait for the chocolate to set slightly at room temperature, and then transfer the brownies onto smaller plates or to tuppaware.

+ store in the freezer, and remove 5 minutes before serving.

HIGH VIBE HYDRATION . WALNUT, TAHINI, HEMP AND BANANA SMOOTHIE

Sugar Free, Vegan, Vegetarian, Recipe, Drinks, Dairy Free, Breakfastdanielle copperman2 Comments

For me, liquid nourishment is a key method for feeling good through food. It's easy. It's quick. It's powerful. And it's always, always delicious. It's also very adaptable - you can swap in and out certain ingredients if you don't have the exact supplies that a recipe calls for, and it hardly notices once everything is blended together. I start every day with a liquid. Sometimes it's a hot drink (either lemon and ginger juice or an adaptogen dissolved in hot water or nut milk) and others it's a more filling option, like a smoothie, shake or smoothie bowl. I tend to use whatever ingredients I have in the kitchen, making things up as I go along usually. That's another great thing about liquid creations. You can really get creative and improvise, and you almost always end up with something wonderful. It's hard to go too far off track, as you can keep adapting until you're happy with the taste. I've decided to start 'High Vibe Hydration' as a regular feature on the blog, as I want to share all of my super quick and creative drinks recipes with anyone stuck for time, and also stuck for cooking motivation. The drinks I create are usually done so through weary, bleary eyes before I've properly woken up, and require no effort and no real recipe structure. The method is generally 'add everything to a blender and blend until smooth' which isn't really a recipe at all. The truth is, everyone knows how to make a smoothie. It's just the flavour combinations and the ingredients choices that some people get stuck with. High Vibe Hydration is here to inspire and enhance your smoothie experience, one unexpected ingredient combination and one superfood at a time.

INGREDIENTS

(Makes 2 medium smoothies or one large one)

30g Almonds*
20g Hemp Seeds*
35g Walnuts*
230ml Water*
100g Banana, ideally frozen
5g Maca
1g Cinnamon
Pinch Himalayan Pink Salt
20g Tahini
Ice Cubes (about 6)

* If you don't have whole nuts and seeds, use 250ml pre-made plant based milk instead

ELEVATE IT

all or a combination of:

1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla Powder
1/2 Teaspoon Mucuna Puriens
1/2 Teaspoon Ashwaganda
1/2 Teaspoon He shou wu
1/2 Teaspoon Chaga

METHOD

If you are not using pre-made nut milk, start by adding the almonds, walnuts, hemp seed and water to your blender and blend on high speed until a smooth milky consistency is reached. Then add the banana, cinnamon, tahini, salt and ice cubes, along with any adaptogens / superfoods from the Elevate It ingredients list. Blend again on the highest speed for 1 minute until the mixture becomes thick and silky smooth. Serve instantly, over extra ice or enjoy as a smoothie bowl, topped with Qnola / nuts / seeds / fruit.



+ Add one large handful of fresh spinach or mixed salad to create a greener option without altering the flavour too much

+ For a fruit-free version, use avocado instead of banana