WELL BEING & OTHER STORIES

Recipes, rituals and other stories to realign the body and mind

AUTUMN

CHAGA CHAI ALMOND MILK WARMER

Sugar Free, Vegan, Vegetarian, Recipe, Drinks, Dairy Free, Business Storiesdanielle coppermanComment

 

The Winter Solstice - the shortest day of sunlight and the longest night of the year - occurs at 4.49am on December 22nd this year. The term 'solstice' derives from the Latin word 'solstitium', which means 'Sun standing still'. The day after Winter solstice marks the beginning of lengthening days, leading up to the summer solstice in June. To celebrate elongated and (hopefully) brighter days, a friend and I have organised an offering of medicinal lattes, tea infusions and a candlelit meditation, followed by a sharing style, bring-a-bowl floor feast for our closest friends, friends of friends and family members. We wanted to bring people together at this busy time of year, where stresses can overpower and disrupt living in the moment at a time that’s supposed to be joyful. Often, as the year comes to an end, panic kicks in about not having achieved enough in the last 365 days, whilst what we should really be focussing on is all that we have accomplished. I’m looking forward to sharing this special moment in our annual cycle with new and old acquaintances, without any sense of time or urgency. In MT Wolf’s song, Burgs, the speaker points out that when we entered this world, we did so with great awe and such wonder. We arrived wondering what it was all about and what our time here was going to be like, but as we became comfortable, we began to wonder more about ourselves - our jobs, our to do lists - forgetting what we came here for. The chance to be here happens briefly, so spend more time taking it in, as well as the people here with you, and enjoying your time here, rather than stressing about it.

I’ve been adding medicinal mushrooms (not as illegal as they sound) to my food and drink for years now. They bring a powerful energy and interesting flavour to things like smoothies, lattes, porridge and savoury meals. They combine with other ingredients to enhance their nutritional benefits. In this recipe I use chaga, which is an adaptogen containing deeply cleansing antioxidants. As an adaptogen, it can help to alleviate stressful feelings and anxiety by balancing the body’s various systems, energizing systems that are fatigued, and quieting those that are overactive. Combined with healthy fats and protein provided by the almond milk, this makes the perfect evening remedy to sooth the soul, calm the mind, and encourage good quality rest.

INGREDIENTS
Serves 2

1/4 Teaspoon Chaga Powder (I also like to use Shilajit)
1 Teaspoon Cardamom Pods
1/2 Inch Fresh Ginger
2 Cinnamon Sticks
1 Teaspoon Vanilla Seeds, Powder or Bean Paste
2 Cups Almond Milk (or other plant based milk)
1/2 Teaspoon Raw Honey, optional

METHOD

Set the almond milk in a small saucepan over a low to medium heat. Add the vanilla, ginger, cardamom pods and cinnamon sticks and heat, stirring constantly, for 10-20 minutes. The longer you simmer, the more the flavours from the spices with infuse the milk. Add the honey towards the end if you want to add some sweetness, then whisk with a hand whisk or an electric whisk (I use this one) to create a frothy texture. This isn't essential, but it is nice. Remove from the heat, transfer to glasses or mugs and serve warm or enjoy chilled over ice.

GRAPE, ORANGE, ALMOND AND WALNUT CRUMBLE

Essentials, Sugar Free, Vegan, Vegetarian, Recipe, Gluten free, Dairy Freedanielle coppermanComment

I recently discovered that I love red grapes. I don’t eat much fruit, which, before I ate healthily would have been a shameful confession, but which now is more a way of life I am neither proud nor ashamed of, and which is a natural progression of a low sugar diet. 
Although grapes are available all year round thanks to global farming and other agricultural plus's, I feel like at the moment they everywhere. Maybe I’m just noticing them more since I ate almost an entire bag of them on a road trip to upstate New York. Since then, grapes went from being something I never particularly fancied in my lunch box at school, to something I had great plans for.

Before now, grapes were just something I was told to eat by my mother as they were good for me, and as one of few things that fell into this category that I actually enjoyed eating, I obeyed. However, I’ve never found them very exciting, and since making my own grocery store decisions, would always choose berries or other fruits over grapes. As a child, freezing grapes was about as experimental as it got (seriously tho, try it). We never cooked them or added them to meals, rarely added them to baked goods or made desserts with them, and definitely never thought about making them into refreshments. Grapes were grapes. Easy, instant, ready to eat. No hassle. But I’ve completely complicated things since rekindling my love for them. Let me introduce you to, roasted grapes. I’ve been roasting bunches and bunches of em since I returned from New York, and I want the world to know that until you roast a grape, you haven’t given it a proper chance in life. 

And until you make a crumble out of roasted grapes, you haven’t given yourself a proper chance in life.

INGREDIENTS

Topping
½  Cup Buckwheat Flour, Oats or Buckwheat Flakes
1 Cup Ground Almonds
1/4 Cup Desiccated Coconut
½ Cup Walnuts
4-5 Tablespoons Coconut Palm Sugar / Pure Maple Syrup / Dates or natural sweetener of choice
Generous Pinch Himalayan Pink Salt
1 Teaspoon Cinnamon
¼ Teaspoon Ground Cardamom (not essential if you don't have it)
3 Tablespoons Coconut Oil - soft / room temp
½ Cup Flaked Almonds or Chopped Nuts of Choice
1 Tablespoon Chia Seeds / Milled Chia Seeds / Milled Flaxseeds

Fruit Layer
4 Cups Red Grapes
1-2 Oranges
¼ Cup Water
½ Cup Chopped Dates / Apricots - optional
Juice of ½ a Lemon
1 Teaspoon Ground Ginger
1 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract / Paste / Powder / Seeds

Optional
1 Teaspoon Acai Powder
1/2 Teaspoon Beetroot Powder
4 Tablespoons Coconut Milk
2 Tablespoons Almond Butter
1 Tablespoon Cacao Powder or Cacao Nibs to top

METHOD

Start by cooking the fruit. Preheat the oven to 200c. Arrange the grapes, oranges and dried fruit, if using, in an oven proof dish and drizzle with the lemon juice. Pierce and roughly mash the grapes using a fork and then place in the oven for 45 minutes. Stir a couple of times to evenly cook the grapes, and after 30 minutes, drain the juices. Save in a jug as the juice makes an instant and delicious sauce to serve with the crumble (and other desserts).
Whilst the fruits cook and begin to soften, make the topping. Blend the walnuts and desiccated coconut together in a food processor, on the highest speed, until they form a rough flour. Transfer into a medium mixing bowl and add the buckwheat flour (or oats or buckwheat flakes, if using), ground almonds, coconut palm sugar, salt, cinnamon, cardamom and flaked almonds or chopped nuts. (Ground cardamom is sometimes quite hard to find, but this recipe will work perfectly well without the spices - they are just there to add flavour). Stir to combine, then add the coconut oil, breaking it up into small pieces and rubbing it into the dry ingredients with your hands. Massage gently until everything is combined and the mixture resembles dough-like breadcrumbs. Remove the fruit from the oven once it has softened and reduced a little. This is the time to stir in the chia seeds, along with any other superfood powders, coconut milk or almond butter, if using. Then arrange the crumble layer, evenly spreading out spoonfuls of the mixture to cover the fruit completely. Press down gently with the back of a spoon or a spatula to make the crumble compact, as this will encourage it to bind and crisp up nicely. Return to the oven and cook for a further 30 minutes, until the topping is brown and becoming crispy, and the fruit layer is bubbling and jam-like.

Top with extra walnuts, flaked almonds or other nuts and serve with probiotic yoghurt, coconut yoghurt, coconut milk, almond milk, cashew cream, cashew custard, the preserved juices from the grapes, almond butter, tahini, cacao powder, fresh basil, mint or thyme, grated raw chocolate or grated orange zest. Get creative.

COCONUT PALM AND SALTED ALMOND DUSTED TOFFEE APPLES

Snacks, Sugar Free, Travel, Vegan, Vegetarian, Recipe, Gluten free, Dairy Freedanielle coppermanComment

I arrived in New York October 23rd. People were already in fancy dress. People's dogs were already in fancy dress. Halloween in the USA is no joke. It is real.

A brief timeline of my first few days in the city:

Settled into my friends apartment in East Village.
Ate at Dimes too many times. Ate at Hu Kitchen too many times.
Saw too many dogs dressed in tutu's.
Said Hola to my agents, had new digitals taken and began a marathon of castings.
Regretted bringing so many jumpers because the weather here is currently tropical.
Said goodbye to my laptop as my flatmate bathed it in lemon and ginger tea. Was forced to take a break from my usual work, so between castings and meetings, made some healthy toffee apples.

Toffee apples are everywhere right now as Fall celebrations like Halloween and Bonfire Night arrive. I was never very fond of them as a child, they were too tough to get into, and the reward for hurting teeth, cutting lips and getting sticky hands wasn't tempting enough for me. They just aren't that good. There I said it. But what I came up with in my friends apartment on the rainiest Fall afternoon, using organic coconut sugar instead of refined sugar, no dairy and the juiciest organic apples, kind of changed my mind about a few things. Particularly my opinion on toffee apples. These ones are much less sickly, much more nutritious, much more flavoursome and the coating is slightly chewy, as opposed to the solidified shards of toffee commonly found coating shop bought options. And if you're worried about people (kids) not liking a healthier version, my flatmate and her boyfriend polished these off in under 2 days, blissfully unaware of what ingredients went into them. They probably don't even know what coconut palm sugar is. So go with it, no one will know...

INGREDIENTS
makes 4-6

1 Cup Coconut Palm Sugar
250ml Cold Water
1 1/4 Cups Almond or Coconut Milk
Generous Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt
1 Teaspoon Lemon Juice - optional
4 Small - Medium Apples of choice (I used Granny Smiths)

+ You will need a selection of bamboo sticks, kebab sticks or lollipop sticks.

TOPPINGS (estimate the amount required depending on which ingredients you choose, and how much you want to coat the apples)

Chopped Salted Almonds (or any nut/seed of choice)
Golden Linseeds
Chia Seeds
Cacao Powder
Maca Powder
Chopped Cacao Nibs
Granola or Qnola

METHOD

Start by boiling the water in a medium saucepan. As it begins to boil, stir in the coconut palm sugar, and let the mixture boil on a high heat for 2-3 more minutes, until the sugar has dissolved. Reduce to a medium heat, then stir in the remaining ingredients. Simmer here for 10-12 minutes, stirring constantly as it can stick to the pan or burn easily. Keep a close eye on it, watching it thicken, and continue to simmer until it becomes darker brown in colour, thicker and begins to reduce slightly. To test whether it is done, take a teaspoonful and rest it on a plate to cool. As it cools it should become even thicker and should be slightly tough to touch. If it is still sticky and runny, continue to simmer and allow it to thicken even more. Once you are happy with the consistency and once it begins to set more solidly, remove the pan from the heat.

Now you need to work relatively quickly as the toffee will cool rapidly. Lightly grease a plate or a baking tray with coconut oil. Take one apple at a time and insert whichever sticks you are using through the middle of it. It shouldn't go all the way through to the other side, but deep enough to ensure it won't slip out. Now, carefully tilt the sauce pan to one side, dip the apple into the toffee mixture, and turn the apple repeatedly to coat it evenly. Lift it out of the toffee and continue to turn it above the mixture, to let any excess drip off. I recommend scraping the bottom gently, to ensure it doesn't stick too much to the plate/tray that you place them on. As the toffee begins to stop dripping, place the apple on your prepare surface, and repeat with the other apples. You can either leave the apples bare like this, or roll them through the toppings of your choice. I chopped some salted almonds finely and placed them in a medium bowl, then gently rolled the apples around in the bowl until the almond dust stuck. If it is easier, you can top the apples by taking a handful of your toppings and pressing it into the toffee coating.
Once coated, or if you are leaving them bare, place the apples in the fridge to cool and set a little more, for around 1 hour. The longer you leave them, the better.

+ These will last for around 2 weeks in the fridge or in an airtight container.
+ You can also use this toffee recipe to make individual toffees. Instead of coating apples, simply allow the toffee to cool a little, and then take teaspoonfuls of the mixture and mould it into individual shapes, or fill chocolate moulds with the mixture, and set in the fridge.

CELERIAC AND CHESTNUT TAGLIATELLE CARBONARA

Vegan, Vegetarian, Gluten freedanielle copperman3 Comments

This is a bold statement to make but i'm going to go ahead with it anyway. This, my dear friends, is better than pasta. Maybe, dare i say it, even better than courgetti. 

INGREDIENTS

1-2 Medium Celeriac
2 Tins Coconut Milk
1/2 Teaspoon Himalayan Pink Salt or Tamari
1/4 Teaspoon Mustard, optional
1/2 Teaspoon Lemon Juice
4 Tablespoons Water
2 Tablespoons Tahini
2-3 Tablespoons Nutritional Yeast
2-3 Tablespoons Olive Oil
1 Clove Garlic, crushed
Ground Black Pepper
Fresh Herbs of choice - I like rosemary, tarragon, parsley or basil
100g Chestnuts, pre-cooked or roasted in olive oil

+ Can also use this brazil nut cheese recipe for the sauce. 

METHOD

Start by preparing the sauce. Heat the olive oil in a pan and add the salt, pepper and garlic. Sauté for 1-2 minutes before adding all of the remaining ingredients. Simmer over a very low heat whilst you turn your attention to the celeriac tagliatelle. Cut the earthy, soily and bumpy outer edges of the celeriac off and discard of them. Cut the celeriac in half if it is large, or slot the entire thing into your spiraliser. + If you don't have a spiraliser (you should) use a julienne peeler, or a normal peeler to make fatter, flatter pasta ribbons. When the celeriac is all spirallised, add it to a pan of water and steam for a few minutes to soften it. Keep an eye on the sauce, stirring constantly and adding water if it is thickening or sticking to the pan. Add the chopped chestnuts and stir through, then either arrange the celeriac tagliatelle across the number of bowls you have to serve, and pour the sauce equally over each portion, or add the sauce to the saucepan and stir it through the celeriac pasta before serving. Garnish with fresh herbs, nutritional yeast and a drizzle of olive or truffle oil. 

CHESTNUT TAHINI FROSTING

danielle coppermanComment

This recipe is great for use on cupcakes, sweet loaves, biscuits or fruit. Making healthy frosting seems like an impossible task, but I have discovered several ways in which you can create it. This frosting closely resembles buttercream icing, as opposed to sickeningly sweet fondant icing, or the simple icing sugar and water method. It is incredibly creamy and the texture is smooth and thick - perfect for piping or spreading onto cakes. Add your own choice of spices or other flavours to match with whatever you are icing, or enjoy on slices of apple or other fruits. This recipe also makes a delicious spread for toast, or can be added to porridge in the place of nut butter to add some flavour.

INGREDIENTS
1 Cup Chestnuts
1/4 Cup Water
2 Tablespoons Tahini
1 Tablespoon Agave, Coconut Palm Sugar, Raw Honey or Date Syrup
Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt

METHOD
Simply add all the ingredients to your blender and blend for 2-3 minutes.

FOR A CHOCOLATE VARIATION

INGREDIENTS
1 Cup Chestnuts
1/4 Cup Water
2 Tablespoons Tahini
1 Tablespoon Agave, Coconut Palm Sugar, Raw Honey or Date Syrup
Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt
3-4 Tablespoons Raw Cacao Powder
2 Tablespoons Coconut Oil
1/4 Ripe Avocado - optional

METHOD
Simply add all the ingredients to your blender and blend for 2-3 minutes.

SWEET POTATO AND JERUSALEM ARTICHOKE PORRIDGE

Brunch, Breakfastdanielle coppermanComment

This winter, I have become reacquainted with porridge - a traditional breakfast option popular across the nation, but so underrated in my opinion. For me, it's not about the porridge (that's just oats and water, or milk at its best). It's about the flavours and the toppings. I have experimented with grains (using my favourite psuedograins like quinoa, amaranth and buckwheat), dairy free milks (which make it a hundred times creamier than water), fresh spices and herbs (i love cardamom or rosemary and basil) and toppings, such as fresh berries, compotes, almond butter sauces and much more. Today I decided that, seeing as it was nearer lunch time than breakfast by the time I woke up, i would have a go at savoury porridge. I used to be obsessed with risotto, and was eager to make a simpler, easier variation of it using gluten free oats. At lunch time, it's harder to find time to spend on cooking, and conventional risotto involves a lot of preparation and a lengthy cooking time. Here, I used a few of my favourite autumnal vegetables such as sweet potato and jerusalem artichoke. The artichoke brings a richness to the recipe and the sweet potato provides the perfect texture, and subtly sweetens the dish.

+ Perfect as breakfast, lunch or dinner, and delicious enjoyed hot or cold. Make extra and chill or freeze the leftovers for later on in the week/month.

INGREDIENTS
1/2 Cup Water
1/2 Cup Coconut or Almond Milk
1/3 Cup Oats
60g Baked or Steamed Sweet Potato
1 Tablespoon Fresh Dill
A Few Sprigs of Fresh Rosemary
1/2 of 1 Jerusalem Artichoke, grated
1 Teaspoon Nutritional Yeast
1 Teaspoon Tamari
3-4 Tablespoons Grated Sweet Potato
1-2 Tablespoons Chia Seeds

Optional Extras
Peas
Garlic
Tahini
Mustard
Chunks of roasted sweet potato or squash

METHOD

Start by cooking the oats. In a large saucepan, heat the oats and the water together. When the oats begin to plumpen and the water is dissolving, stir in the coconut milk and the sweet potato. I prefer using steamed sweet potato, but grated with create just as much flavour. The cooked sweet potato makes the porridge thicker and more creamy. Stir the porridge constantly to break down the large chunks of sweet potato, and add more water if you think it is needed. Add the grated jerusalem artichoke, dill, rosemary, nutritional yeast and tamari, along with any of your other chosen ingredients (peas work well for a filling lunch dish). Simmer for 10-15 minutes, adding more water or milk as you think is needed. The porridge should resemble a risotto more than a porridge, due to the thick, creamy sweet potato sauce.

TOP WITH
Truffle or Avocado Oil
Grated Beetroot or Jerusalem Artichoke or Sweet Potato
Tamari Toasted Seeds
Chopped Avocado
Poached or Halved Soft Boiled Egg
Fresh Herbs of choice
Homemade Spinach or Kale and Nut Pesto
Tahini

PUMPKIN PIE AND A POP UP

Sugar Free, Vegetarian, Gluten freedanielle copperman6 Comments

My first and only experience of pumpkin pie up until now was at my best friends house around the age of 13. With an american father, Thanksgiving is a big deal in their house, but I’d never really celebrated it before. At an awkward age of growth spurts and secondary school I almost didn’t even try the pie and tried to turn down the offer politely. It didn’t look especially appealing and i’d never tried it before, so naturally assumed it couldn’t be that special. Thankfully, her mother persuaded me and just one mouthful of that warm, homemade pie has remained a vivid memory in my mind ever since. I think a section of my brain is dedicated entirely to food, and times or occasions associated with certain foods. Sometimes i can even remember a conversation or event simply because i remember the food we were eating, or the restaurant we were in at the time. I can still see that pumpkin pie, fresh out of the oven, sitting on the countertop and can still smell the warmth of its spices. The sheer brilliance of pumpkin pie makes me wonder why it has taken me this long to attempt it myself. It is brilliant enough made with cheap pre-made pastry or shop-bought in festive packaging, but is even more brilliant if you make it by hand, with fresh pastry, and make it without any unnatural ingredients. So if you like that cream, the sugar and the buttery base, look away. You’re not going to like this version. Well, you’re not going to like the sound of this version, but if you do decide to trust me, you’ll realise it tastes just the same, if not better, than what you’re used to. 

Before changing my diet i enjoyed baking brownies and rice crispy cakes on a regular basis - in fact, so often that i knew the recipes backwards, upside down and read with my eyes shut. I’d mastered two very amazing recipes, and they were easy, so making a pie seemed like an impossible task - some kind of art form i was certainly incapable of and which was definitely out of my league. But since i now use vegetables in baking and know how to make pastry with nuts and without gluten, I felt it was about time i revisited that moment in my best friends kitchen, embraced this seasons most delicious ingredients and made that classic holiday favourite, with a lot of things taken out, but with a whole lot of other good things added. 

It’s hard for me to remember exactly how mama coleman’s pie tasted, but to me this one is all that a pumpkin pie should be. The base is different, as it is not real pastry. It is made without butter and with no flour - just nutritious nuts and nourishing coconut oil. Where most pies (especially shop bought pies) taste smooth and artificial, the base of this pie is crunchy, nutty and flavoursome. The filling is amazing, especially for people who are intolerant to gluten or just generally don’t desire the feeling of fullness that comes as a side effect of eating cakes. The filling is so smooth and light and, made with coconut oil and coconut milk, is a kind of creaminess you just can’t find in normal, artificial desserts. If theres one thing you make this winter, let this be it. Far better than chocolate, far better than mince pies and far better than the pumpkin pie you had last year. With this recipe, you can have your cake/pie/cheesecake/vegetables and eat them, all at once. Blissfully unaware that you are eating your way through the holidays to a healthier New Year, thanks to all the vitamins and minerals in pumpkin which will keep your immune system in check this winter. Eat up, it’s basically medicine. You neeeeeed it.

INGREDIENTS

Crust
1 Cup Walnuts
1/2 Cup Pecans
1 Cup Buckwheat Flour
1/2 Cup Coconut Oil, room temperature
1/3 Teaspoon Salt
1 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract
2 Tablespoon Agave or Date Syrup
1 Teaspoon Cinnamon

Filling
2 Cups Pumpkin, chopped (squash will work too) (if you haven’t the time or patience, buy some organic pumpkin puree from a local health food shop)
2 Tablespoons Agave or Date Syrup
1 Tablespoon Coconut Palm Sugar
1/3 Teaspoon Salt
1 1/2 Tablespoons Cinnamon
1 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract
1/2 Tin Coconut Milk (the solid part only)
4 Tablespoons Coconut Oil, melted
1 Egg
2 Teaspoons Maca, optional
1 Teaspoon Lucuma, optional

METHOD

Heat the oven to 200c.
Start by roasting the pumpkin for the filling. Remove the skin and place in a roasting dish with a little splash of olive oil or some coconut oil, and roast for 25-35 minutes. It needs to be as soft as possible.

Crust
Once the pumpkin is cooked, reduce the oven temperature to 160c.

Blend the nuts in a food processor or blender until they become a fine flour consistency. Pour into a medium bowl and add the flour, salt, vanilla and cinnamon. Mix together with a wooden spoon, then add the coconut oil, combining with your hands. The mixture should begin to form a dough. Make the dough into a ball and it should hold its shape. Take a round baking tray or cake tin, roughly 20cm in diameter (you can also use a rectangle dish if you don’t have a round one) and grease the bottom and the sides with a light coating of coconut oil. Press the dough into tin, making the base no more than 1cm thick, and making sure to press the dough around the sides too. Use a fork to pierce the dough in the middle, and bake for 15 minutes, until it begins to brown, and until it is dry to touch.
Whilst it bakes, make the filling.

Filling

+ TIP: Pumpkins with paler skins generally taste nicer and have a smoother less stringy texture when cooked. Look for crown princes or any with a greyish/blueish skin.

Take the cooked pumpkin and place it in your blender or food processor along with the rest of the filling ingredients. I strongly advise using the egg and also maca if you have it, as the egg provides a vanilla-y flavour and a smooth texture and the maca adds an incredible malty caramel flavour. Blend all of the ingredients together until the mixture is smooth. Add a little more coconut milk or oil if the mixture needs help getting smooth.

When the base is cooked, leave to cool for 5-10 minutes and then pour the filling mixture into it. Spread the filling evenly across the pie base, ensuring it reaches the sides too. Return to the oven and cook for 40 minutes, until the middle of the filling is firm to touch. If it is still quite wet or gooey to touch, leave it to cook for a little longer until you can be sure it is cooked through. The top should begin to brown and crack a little, and you should be able to stick a knife in the centre and bring it out clean. 

Let cool for at least 20 minutes. I prefer it from the fridge as the filling becomes a wonderful consistency, but it is also delicious enjoyed warm. Serve with coconut yoghurt or coconut cream, fresh berries or a warm berry compote.

+ Save the Seeds 
Pumpkin seeds also carry a lot of nutrients, so don’t throw them away. They are high in protein and fibre and also contain tryptophan which is a chemical compound that triggers happiness and positivity and reduces stress. Pumpkin seeds also contain anti-inflammatory properties and essential vitamins and minerals. Toss them in coconut oil or olive oil and your choice of natural sweetener and spices, or use nutritional yeast, tamari and dried herbs and spices to make a quick a savoury snack.

BLEND AND PRESS POP UP

I am excited to announce that next weekend i will be popping up and taking over Blend and Press in Neals Yard. I will be running an exclusive Model Mange Tout brunch menu, and i will be there from 10.30-1.30pm. Pop in and say hi, and choose from my nutritious gluten, grain, dairy and refined sugar free menu. I will be serving Cacao Chia Porridge with Almond Sauce and berries, Sweet Potato Cashew Pudding with Christmas Qnola, Cranberry and Rosemary Compote and Toasted Chestnuts, and Buckwheat Pancakes with Coconut Cream, Tahini and Cacao Sauce.

Prices start from £4.95. Hope to see you there! Come in, keep warm and wake up well!