WELL BEING & OTHER STORIES

Recipes, rituals and other stories to realign the body and mind

GLUTEN FREE

SIMPLE AVOCADO, ALMOND AND COCONUT GELATO

Sugar Free, Summer, Vegan, Vegetarian, Recipe, Paleo, Gluten free, Dairy Free, Beautydanielle coppermanComment

Eating Ice cream, for me, is usually a spoon in tub kind of activity, which is why you wont find an ice cream scoop in my kitchen. Pointless waste of space or what? A spoons a spoon and if scooping is all that needs doing, I think my current collection has all angles covered. Well actually, today I swayed more towards the ‘or what’ part of that sentence. It would have been nicer, neater and easier for me to get across the beauty of this simple, no-churn, no-ice-cream-maker ice cream with the help of an ice cream scoop. But, by default, I’ve accidentally proven that this ice cream - as well as being achievable without an ice cream maker (who actually owns one), and without dairy or refined sugar - is also achievable without an ice cream scoop. This is probably not very exciting for you because, I realise, for most people, the presence of an ice cream scoop in the cutlery drawer is not a big deal. But I’m basically making an excuse for my shoddy food styling, so just go with it, yh. It's Christmas after all. 

INGREDIENTS

2 Ripe Avocados
¼ Cup Almond or Coconut Milk (or alternative plant based milk)
6 Heaped Tablespoons Solid Coconut Milk
Generous Pinch of Salt
1 Teaspoon Vanilla Paste / Extract / Powder / Seeds
1 Tablespoon Raw Honey / Coconut Palm Sugar / Agave / 2 Medjool Dates
2 Tablespoons Flaked Almonds
2 Tablespoons Hulled Hemp Seeds

Optional
2 Tablespoons Strong Coffee or 1 Teaspoon Coffee Powder
1 Tablespoon Ground Chicory Powder
1/2 Teaspoon Medicinal Mushroom Powder (Reishi / Shilajit / Chaga)
Handful Fresh Mint Leaves
Handful Fresh Mint Leaves and Cacao Nibs or Chunks of Raw Chocolate

METHOD

Simply blend all the ingredients except for the flaked almonds and hemp seeds in a high speed blender or food processor. If you are adding the optional flavourings, add them now too - apart from the cacao nibs or raw chocolate, which should be stirred gently through the main mixture before freezing. Blend on a high speed for 2-3 minutes until the blender runs consistently and smoothly on its highest speed. Taste, and add a little more sweetener, salt or flavourings to suit your tastes. Transfer to a deep container, bowl or a bread tin. Stir in the cacao nibs or chocolate, if using, or your choice of dried fruits, nuts, seeds, nut butter, berries or compotes (to create a raspberry ripple kind of taste sensation). You can enjoy instantly as it is, as a pudding / mousse / yoghurt kind of dessert, or freeze for around 4 hours (depending on the depth of your tin) or overnight to turn it into a rich, creamy ice cream. 
This recipe doesn’t require an ice cream maker as previously stated, which means the texture can be a little tricky to work with, and serving the ice cream requires organisation and a little patience. Remove from the freezer 1 hour before you wish to serve. Let it thaw at room temperature for 20 minutes, and then leave to thaw gradually in the fridge for 40 minutes. When ready to serve, simply scoop single portions into bowls and top with the flaked almonds and hemp seeds, to add protein and healthy fats, as well as texture and sprinkle-like excitement.

COCONUT PALM AND SALTED ALMOND DUSTED TOFFEE APPLES

Snacks, Sugar Free, Travel, Vegan, Vegetarian, Recipe, Gluten free, Dairy Freedanielle coppermanComment

I arrived in New York October 23rd. People were already in fancy dress. People's dogs were already in fancy dress. Halloween in the USA is no joke. It is real.

A brief timeline of my first few days in the city:

Settled into my friends apartment in East Village.
Ate at Dimes too many times. Ate at Hu Kitchen too many times.
Saw too many dogs dressed in tutu's.
Said Hola to my agents, had new digitals taken and began a marathon of castings.
Regretted bringing so many jumpers because the weather here is currently tropical.
Said goodbye to my laptop as my flatmate bathed it in lemon and ginger tea. Was forced to take a break from my usual work, so between castings and meetings, made some healthy toffee apples.

Toffee apples are everywhere right now as Fall celebrations like Halloween and Bonfire Night arrive. I was never very fond of them as a child, they were too tough to get into, and the reward for hurting teeth, cutting lips and getting sticky hands wasn't tempting enough for me. They just aren't that good. There I said it. But what I came up with in my friends apartment on the rainiest Fall afternoon, using organic coconut sugar instead of refined sugar, no dairy and the juiciest organic apples, kind of changed my mind about a few things. Particularly my opinion on toffee apples. These ones are much less sickly, much more nutritious, much more flavoursome and the coating is slightly chewy, as opposed to the solidified shards of toffee commonly found coating shop bought options. And if you're worried about people (kids) not liking a healthier version, my flatmate and her boyfriend polished these off in under 2 days, blissfully unaware of what ingredients went into them. They probably don't even know what coconut palm sugar is. So go with it, no one will know...

INGREDIENTS
makes 4-6

1 Cup Coconut Palm Sugar
250ml Cold Water
1 1/4 Cups Almond or Coconut Milk
Generous Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt
1 Teaspoon Lemon Juice - optional
4 Small - Medium Apples of choice (I used Granny Smiths)

+ You will need a selection of bamboo sticks, kebab sticks or lollipop sticks.

TOPPINGS (estimate the amount required depending on which ingredients you choose, and how much you want to coat the apples)

Chopped Salted Almonds (or any nut/seed of choice)
Golden Linseeds
Chia Seeds
Cacao Powder
Maca Powder
Chopped Cacao Nibs
Granola or Qnola

METHOD

Start by boiling the water in a medium saucepan. As it begins to boil, stir in the coconut palm sugar, and let the mixture boil on a high heat for 2-3 more minutes, until the sugar has dissolved. Reduce to a medium heat, then stir in the remaining ingredients. Simmer here for 10-12 minutes, stirring constantly as it can stick to the pan or burn easily. Keep a close eye on it, watching it thicken, and continue to simmer until it becomes darker brown in colour, thicker and begins to reduce slightly. To test whether it is done, take a teaspoonful and rest it on a plate to cool. As it cools it should become even thicker and should be slightly tough to touch. If it is still sticky and runny, continue to simmer and allow it to thicken even more. Once you are happy with the consistency and once it begins to set more solidly, remove the pan from the heat.

Now you need to work relatively quickly as the toffee will cool rapidly. Lightly grease a plate or a baking tray with coconut oil. Take one apple at a time and insert whichever sticks you are using through the middle of it. It shouldn't go all the way through to the other side, but deep enough to ensure it won't slip out. Now, carefully tilt the sauce pan to one side, dip the apple into the toffee mixture, and turn the apple repeatedly to coat it evenly. Lift it out of the toffee and continue to turn it above the mixture, to let any excess drip off. I recommend scraping the bottom gently, to ensure it doesn't stick too much to the plate/tray that you place them on. As the toffee begins to stop dripping, place the apple on your prepare surface, and repeat with the other apples. You can either leave the apples bare like this, or roll them through the toppings of your choice. I chopped some salted almonds finely and placed them in a medium bowl, then gently rolled the apples around in the bowl until the almond dust stuck. If it is easier, you can top the apples by taking a handful of your toppings and pressing it into the toffee coating.
Once coated, or if you are leaving them bare, place the apples in the fridge to cool and set a little more, for around 1 hour. The longer you leave them, the better.

+ These will last for around 2 weeks in the fridge or in an airtight container.
+ You can also use this toffee recipe to make individual toffees. Instead of coating apples, simply allow the toffee to cool a little, and then take teaspoonfuls of the mixture and mould it into individual shapes, or fill chocolate moulds with the mixture, and set in the fridge.

Why you need white beans to up your all-natural carbonara game

Vegan, Vegetarian, Recipe, Gluten free, Dinner, Dairy Freedanielle copperman8 Comments

Since changing my diet and cutting out wheat, gluten, grains, and any heavily processed carbohydrates, I've been surprised at how little I have missed certain things I thought I would struggle horrendously without. I always loved pizza. I always, always loved carbonara. Needless to say, I've always been fond of cheese. And I even went through a phase where I'd get home from school and make a huge bowl of pasta with cheese and baked beans, as a snack. A pre-dinner before my dinner. So to say goodbye to my favourite Italian dishes seemed a crying shame, but I soon became more excited by making spaghetti out of vegetables, and pestos and sauces out of natural ingredients.

This recipe is a cut above all other veggie pasta dishes, and tastes so much more like the real thing, and in my opinion, so much better than it, too. It all began when I was in the kitchen making an insanely good soup, surrounded by brilliant ingredients all not really knowing what they were there for, what they were doing or where they were gonna end up. If ever a vegetable or a legume could look unsure of itself, it was at this moment, in my kitchen. The ingredients were not familiar with one other, and no one was feeling confident about how their time spent together was going to end up, but something happened in that blender that should have happened a long, long time ago. 

I've made carbonara sauce before, but I wanted to make a new version without using coconut or nuts - as I find coconut milk can be quite rich sometimes, and I've also been trying to reduce the amount of nuts I eat recently, because I went a bit overboard for a while. The beans in this recipe make it a good source of protein, and the lack of thick, processed cream or real cheese make it lower in bad fats and completely free from dairy, unlike most shop bought sauces and conventional recipes. The beans, combined with the oil and water, create a wholesome, flavoursome creaminess, even tastier than what would be achieved with real cream, and the nutritional yeast creates a mild cheesy flavour - essential in any pasta dish. This recipe is entirely gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, grain free, nut free, vegan and vegetarian. You can enjoy it plain (pictured above), with fresh herbs, or with your own choice of vegetables, meat, fish or seafood.

+ You can also omit the pasta entirely, and enjoy the sauce on its own as a simple White Bean Soup, served hot or cold as a gazpacho.

INGREDIENTS
serves 3-4

320g White Beans / Cannelloni Beans
1/2 Cup Olive Oil
1 Cup Water (can also use almond or coconut milk for an even creamier sauce)
4-5 Tablespoons Nutritional Yeast
1/4-1/2 Teaspoon Himalayan Pink Salt
Pepper, to taste
Small Handful Fresh Basil Leaves
180-200g Gluten Free/Buckwheat/Spelt (not gluten free)/Black Bean/Mung Bean/Edamame Pasta or Regular Spaghetti

OPTIONAL SAUCE FLAVOURINGS
1 Small Clove Garlic, crushed
1 Teaspoon Mustard
Handful Fresh Basil
1-2 Tablespoons Homemade Dairy Free Nut Pesto
Pepper, to season

OPTIONAL TOPPINGS
Handful Fresh Basil
Sauteed Mushrooms
Roasted Chestnuts
Fresh or Raw Spinach, Watercress or Rocket
Fresh Cherry Tomatoes
Roasted Vegetables
Organic Bacon
Grilled/Shredded Chicken
Flaked/Smoked Salmon

METHOD

Start by blending together the beans, olive oil, water, nutritional yeast and salt. Blend for 2-3 minutes on the highest speed your blender can reach. Meanwhile, bring a medium pan of water to the boil and, once boiling, add your spaghetti or whichever type of pasta you are using. Add a little salt and a dash of olive or coconut oil to reduce the risk of the pasta sticking together (this can be quite common with gluten free pasta's, depending on which alternative you go for). Once the sauce is blended and has become a smooth consistency, taste it to check you are happy with the flavour and texture. Add more nutritional yeast if you want it slightly cheesier, more salt (and pepper) to season, more water if you want a thinner sauce, and any extras from the Optional section of the ingredients list. (If you want to add bacon, don't blend this into the sauce. Simply fry or grill the bacon, cut into small pieces and set aside to stir through the pasta, once it is cooked).
When you are happy with your sauce, and when the pasta is cooked, drain the pasta, return it to the pan and stir through the sauce. At this point, add your bacon or any other toppings of your choice. Heat through for a couple of minutes then serve. Finish with a little extra olive oil, a sprinkling of salt and a drizzle of fresh lemon juice.

+ You can also use the sauce recipe as an alternative to cheese sauce, which you can use in a healthier lasagne or pasta bake.

EASTER EGG SHORTBREADS

Snacks, Sugar Free, Vegan, Vegetarian, Gluten freedanielle coppermanComment

Shortbreads, despite their three main components being butter, sugar and white flour, have proven to be one of the easiest things to make healthily. I substitute the butter with coconut oil, the sugar with coconut palm sugar or natural fruit sugars/syrups, and the white flour with buckwheat flour, oat flour, or nuts ground into a flour consistency. From there, it is easy to add other ingredients to increase the nutritional profile of your biscuits even more - such as superfood powders, raw vegetables and linseeds/flaxseeds or chia seeds. You can also very easily make these into savoury or sweet biscuits, simply reducing the amount of coconut palm sugar or syrup used for savoury biscuits (and adding vegetables, more flour and nutritional yeast for a cheesy flavour), or increasing the coconut palm sugar or syrup quantities to your personal taste, and adding things like low fructose dried fruit and super foods like maca and cacao. Once you've got the base down, you can add pretty much anything.

And you don't have to skip the icing either! Creamed coconut is a mysterious ingredient and, as it sets, resembles sugar icing almost exactly. I actually prefer it, as it has a nicer texture, a creamier flavour and doesn't leave a strange aftertaste or sugaring coating in your mouth after you've eaten it. While some of the colouring items are quite an investment, they're definitely worth it. I alternate adding each one to smoothies, porridge and soups as well.

-  View the full recipe on WOMENSHEALTHMAG.CO.UK  -


COCONUT, MISO AND CARDAMOM BUCKWHEAT 'RICE' PUDDING

Sugar Free, Gluten free, Breakfastdanielle copperman11 Comments

From time to time there is a fine line between breakfast and dessert. This recipe represents one of those times. You could eat this for dessert at a gourmet restaurant, or you could eat this with your kids around the breakfast table on a sunday, in your pyjamas. It's up to you, but I know what I'd rather. I love all things breakfast, and although I don't always get time to make a good one during the week, my weekends are almost entirely centred around it. If I have a relatively calm weekend with not much going on, i'll take my sweet time getting out of bed, deciding what to make for breakfast, perhaps visiting the local grocery shop in clothes that certainly aren't socially acceptable, and then preparing, serving and enjoying a nutritious kind of feel-good feast. That's what weekends are for! The more people around the kitchen table and the more mouths to feed, the better.

This take on porridge is considerably creamier and has, in my opinion, a much more pleasant texture than oat porridge. Growing up, I hated porridge as I always got tough oats stuck in my teeth, and also, I hadn't been introduced to any of the ingredients I love now, so I was terribly unaware of how toppings could transform a sloppy, bland bowl of soggy oats into something I wanted to eat all day, all night and then again in my dreams. As well as being incredibly softer, plumper and creamier, buckwheat (a fibrous seed) is far more nutritious than oats - higher in (easily digestible) proteins, high in magnesium and, despite it's name, gluten and wheat free. It also helps control and reduce water retention in the body, and aids digestion.

To keep this breakfast/snack/dessert everything-free like the rest of ModelMangeTout, I use coconut or almond milk in this recipe instead of cows milk. Instead of sugar, you can incorporate coconut palm sugar/nectar, agave, stevia or raw honey (you may not need any sweetener at all - but I would recommend it for a dessert option). And, as with all porridge, you can get creative and play around with what you put in it, and on it, to make it more than just a bowl of stodge. In this recipe, I used miso and cardamom as they go really well with the coconut flavour from the milk, but you can use any herbs or spices and can add nuts, seeds, dried or fresh fruit and superfood powders of your choice.

INGREDIENTS
Serves 2 for breakfast, 4 for dessert portions

1 1/2 Cups Raw Buckwheat Groats, soaked overnight
5-6 Tablespoons Chia Seeds
2 Tablespoons Golden Linseeds/Flaxseeds - optional
1 Tin Coconut Milk
1/2 Cup Almond Milk (or water)
1 Tablespoon Agave/Coconut Nectar/Honey
2-3 Tablespoons Coconut Palm Sugar/Stevia (to taste) (can also use more agave/syrup if that's all you have)
1/2 Teaspoon Miso Paste (I like Clearspring)
1/2 Teaspoon Ground Cardamom
1 Tablespoon Coconut Oil
1 Teaspoon Vanilla Powder or Extract
1/2 Teaspoon Ground Ginger
1/2 Tablespoon Maca Powder

TOPPINGS PICTURED

Chopped Mango
Julienned/Peeled/Grated/Spiralised Kohlrabi
Solid Coconut Milk
Crushed Dried Hibiscus Petals
Coconut Blossom Nectar

METHOD

Make sure you have soaked your raw buckwheat groats overnight or for at least 8 hours. Rinse it thoroughly through a sieve then place it in a medium saucepan along with the the coconut milk and almond milk or water. Bring to the boil and then reduce the heat to medium/low. Simmer for 30-40 minutes (i should have warned you, this is certainly not the ideal breakfast for time-poor people, but if you make it one morning or over the weekend when you have more time, make enough to store in the fridge in jars or containers to grab-and-go on other mornings throughout the week). After 10 minutes, add the agave, coconut palm sugar, miso paste, chia seeds, linseeds (if using), cardamom, coconut oil, vanilla and ginger. Continue to simmer, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon. Add more miso or natural sweetener to taste, along with any other spices or super foods you fancy. I like adding dried goji berries or fresh blueberries whilst it is cooking, as they become soft and juicy, adding a refreshing flavour to the bowl.

Once the milks have more or less reduced and been completely absorbed by the buckwheat and the other seeds, remove from the heat and serve immediately, or leave to cool and store in airtight containers in the fridge until you are ready to enjoy. Reheat, or stir with hot nut milk or water before serving, or enjoy chilled. 

Top with more coconut milk or coconut cream, more berries or fresh fruit, and another teaspoon of coconut oil which will melt into it porridge wonderfully.

+ For dessert options, serve with cacao sauce, cacao avocado cream or almond caramel.

PUY LENTIL AND OLIVE HOUMOUS

Sugar Free, Summer, Vegan, Vegetarian, Gluten freedanielle coppermanComment

Simply the best.

INGREDIENTS

100g Cooked Puy Lentil
1 Tin Chickpeas, drained
1/2 cup Olive Oil
50g Black Olives, pitted
Juice from 
1/2 Fresh Lemon
3 Tablespoon Tahini
1/4 Cup Water
Lemon Juice
1 Large Handful Fresh Basil

METHOD

Simply place all ingredients in your blender and blend for 2-3 minutes on a high speed. Add a little water if the mixture needs help to get going. Season to taste and enjoy.

MODEL MANGE TOUT MOON MILK

Drinks, Breakfastdanielle copperman2 Comments

Nut milk. It really is like liquid gold. It's delicious, it makes you feel good - it should really be considered a drug. Someone should definitely have warned me about it.

I rarely drink it on its own, although there is nothing like a cold glass of fresh milk to accompany a biscuit or some baked goods. Nut milk has not only changed the way I drink coffee, it has changed the way I drink fruit and vegetables, the way I cook and the way I bake. When I was younger, my mum would make smoothies with us and I remember loving them. As a young child I felt that if I memorised the key components, I could put all sorts of things into a blender and it would be guaranteed to taste amazing. Back then, these components were cows milk, fruit, yoghurt of some kind, and highly processed apple or orange juice. I think I probably even tried undiluted squash, like ribena, at some point, ignorant to the fact it would taste more like i'd made a smoothie out of wine gums than fruit. To me, this was a healthy combination up until only a couple of years ago. That's not to say it is unhealthy, especially - it just doesn't fit into my lifestyle anymore. But not only because I don't eat dairy or sugary drinks, mainly because the alternatives I've discovered actually taste better. 

I now use nut milk as a base for my smoothies, and it is so creamy that you don't need that extra dollop of yoghurt. Instead, I use things like avocado or spinach to thicken them and bind the ingredients together. I still use fruit, but I use low gi fruits that are high in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, such as dark berries. And I try and get as many vegetables into the mix too. Spinach is a mild place to start, as it doesn't overpower the rest of the smoothie and breaks down nicely into a creamy consistency. But as your tastes develop, i'd strongly suggest adding cucumber, courgette or other green vegetables, either whole, grated or juiced beforehand. 

Aside from smoothies, nut milks taste incredible when they're flavoured naturally. In smoothies, the milk kind of gets pushed aside as the sharpness of the frozen berries and the flavours of your super foods take over. But flavouring nut milk is my current obsession. The texture is smoother and lighter than a smoothie, and enjoyed cold, it is so refreshing. Not dissimilar to a milkshake, flavoured nut milk is one of the easiest, fastest and most delicious ways to get your intake of vitamins, healthy fats and general goodness.  Conventional sugary, creamy milkshakes come in a few standard flavours, such as chocolate, strawberry and banana. If you simply take away the ice-cream and artificial flavourings, add some natural sweetener or some fruit, infuse with some super foods, healing herbs and spices and even add some vegetable juice, you've instantly transformed a traditionally life threatening drink into a tasty way to nourish your body. 

A few of my favourite nut milk flavours include turmeric / goji berry / maca / vanilla and cardamom / avocado / coconut / beetroot, amongst others - some of which you can find elsewhere on the blog. Below is my bedtime favourite. Made with relaxing vanilla and chamomile, which has been used for decades as an even more relaxing sleep aid, and also to treat colds, flu, stomach issues, inflammation and other ailments, this milk is a deeply therapeutic concoction which will work to repair your body after a long day.

INGREDIENTS

1 Cup Almonds, soaked
2 Cups Cold Water (or you can use store bought milk; but make sure it's safe)
1/3 Cup of Dried Chamomile Flowers or Extract (or 2 chamomile tea bags if you can't locate these products)
Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt, optional
1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla Seeds

Optional
1/2 Teaspoon Coconut Blossom Nectar

METHOD

Add your nuts of choice and the water to your blender and blend on a high speed for 2 minutes. Pour the liquid through a nut milk bag or a jam straining bag, into a jug or large bowl. Return the strained milk (save the pulp for baking, for smoothies or to dry into almond meal) and add the vanilla. Blend again until everything is smooth and pour through a fine sieve into a large saucepan. Heat the milk on a medium heat and add the chamomile flowers, extract or your tea bags. Simmer for 5 minutes, then reduce the heat until it is low. Leave to infuse for 20-25 minutes. Remove the flowers or tea bags, add your choice of sweetener towards the end, mix to combine and strain one last time before serving.

Serve hot off the stove, just before bed, or store in the fridge and enjoy cold.

COURGETTE AND SPINACH CREPES

Snacks, Vegetarian, Lunch, Gluten free, Dinner, Brunch, Breakfastdanielle copperman1 Comment

When i was a child, i thought that pancakes literally came from heaven. i made them every weekend and used to dowse them in maple or golden syrup, peanut butter, or sugar and lemon. It began to be less about the pancakes and more about the toppings.

They are delicious, and the best thing about them is how easy they are to make. I used to make 3 ingredient crepes which just involved whisking the mixture and pouring it into the pan. As my tastebuds and nutritionally hungry mind have developed, i have found ways of making these pancakes with as many ingredients as possible. And by that, i don’t mean artificial additives. I add fruit and vegetables to my pancakes these days, and substitute white flour and cows milk for creamy nut milks and nutritious, fibrous, high-protein seeds (amaranth, millet, buckwheat, quinoa) or their flaked versions. I also add as many super foods as possible, and only sweeten the pancakes with natural, unrefined syrups or coconut palm sugar. Although these green crepes are savoury and i don’t use any sweetener at all, you could very easily make them sweet, as the crepes themselves have a very neutral flavour, and don't taste as spinach-y as they look! You could top them with fruit, natural syrups of your choice or raw nutella, but I prefer these for lunch or dinner, topped with vegetables, salad, tahini and other dressings.

Happy pancake day! 

INGREDIENTS
(makes 10-12 large crepes)

220g Buckwheat Flour
3 Eggs
2 Cups Coconut Milk or Almond Milk
1 Cup Water
1 Tablespoon Coconut Oil, melted
Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt
2 Large Handfuls Spinach or Watercress
1 Tablespoon Fresh Basil Leaves
1 Cup Courgette, grated or spiralled
1/2 Teaspoon Spirulina or Chlorella
1/2 Teaspoon Charcoal Powder, optional
Coconut Oil, for frying

METHOD

Simply place all of the ingredients into a high speed blender. Add the milk and the eggs first to avoid the flour becoming a lump and clogging the blade. Blend on a high speed for about 1-2 minutes, until the mixture is smooth and becomes a pale green. Once completely smooth, heat a heaped teaspoon of coconut oil in a frying pan. When it has melted, pour the crepe mixture directly from the jug of your blender (less washing up!) and spread the mixture out evenly across the pan by moving and rotating it gently. Don't use too much mixture at once of the crepe will be too thick and cakey. Pour in enough to cover the middle of your pan, leaving about 2 inches between the edges of the pancake and the sides of the pan. Then spread the mixture to make it slightly larger, and thinner. Cook for about 3 minutes, then flip with a spatula and cook on the other side. The pancake should begin to brown and crisp ever so slightly at the edges. You may need to flip it over several times to get it exactly right and cooked through.

Repeat until you have used all of the mixture, or store any leftover batter in the fridge, in a jug covered with cling film or an airtight container. I'd advise you to cook them all at once though, so you'll always have the foundations of a healthy snack, breakfast, lunch or dinner, when you're short for time.

+ Serve with Chanterelle Pate, Tahini Avocado Cream or simple mashed avocado, Carrot Sesame Dressing, Red Pepper Houmous, Pure Tahini and fresh or steamed vegetables. These are also amazing with Pea Houmous, Bean Slaw and Celeriac Broccoli Slaw.

CARROT SESAME DRESSING

INGREDIENTS

2 Carrots, grated
Juice of 1/2 Orange
1/2 Teaspoon Lemon or Lime Juice
1/2 Teaspoon Tamari or pinch of salt
4 Tablespoons Olive Oil 
1 Tablespoon Cold Water
2 Tablespoons Sesame Oil
1/2 Teaspoon Ground Ginger or fresh ginger, grated
1/4 Teaspoon Ground Turmeric or 1/4 teaspoon grated fresh turmeric
2 Tablespoons Goji Berries, optional (can substitute for 1/2 teaspoon honey)

METHOD

Soak the goji berries, if using, in a small bowl in just enough boiling water to cover them. Let sit for 5 minutes, to soften. Place all of the other ingredients into your blender, adding the goji berries once they become soft, and blend together on a high speed for 2-3 minutes, until the carrot is no longer lumpy, and the mixture becomes smooth and thin.

Season to taste.

+ Thicken with tahini if you want a thicker dip/dressing. Or blend 1/2 ripe avocado in with the rest of the ingredients.

RAW VANILLA SHORTBREADS

Snacks, Sugar Free, Gluten free, Breakfastdanielle coppermanComment

The recipe for these raw shortbreads came about quite accidentally. I was going through the stages of making Raw Caramel Shortbreads and got as far as step two, when I realised how good step one tasted solo. I scrambled the mixture out of the baking tin and chopped the raw biscuit base into fingers resemblant of the  traditional tea-time favourites. Despite having a buttery biscuit base (did I steal that from somewhere?), these biscuits are set in the freezer, instead of baked. If you're used to conventional biscuits you probably can't even begin to imagine how these must taste. But let me assure you; these biscuits are more melt-in-the mouth than a Rich Tea, any day. They are incredibly moreish, cleverly crafted and, simply put, very, very nice indeed. No matter how hungry or fed I am, each bite - even the tiniest nibble -  is a thrill that never loses its charge. 

Once set in the freezer to stiffen, these biscuits have almost exactly the same texture as a normal shortbread, just a little less crumbly. They are like a cross between shortbread and fudge - a winning combination if ever I came across one.

INGREDIENTS

100g cashews
1 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract or the seeds from 1 vanilla pod
A Generous Pinch of Salt
3 Tablespoons Tahini
5 Tablespoons Ground Almonds
3 Tablespoons Desiccated Coconut
1/4 Cup Coconut Oil, melted on a low heat
2-3 Tablespoons Agave

Optional
Juice and Zest of 1 Unwaxed Lemon
Fresh Rosemary
Cacao Powder
Raw Chocolate Chunks or Raw Cacao Nibs
Superfoods of Choice - Lucuma, Maca, Mucuna and Chia Seeds work well

METHOD

Simply add all of the ingredients to a high speed blender. The speed and power of your blender is really important for this recipe, as the biscuit tastes so much better smooth. 

 + Experiment with flavours such as solid coconut milk or creamed coconut, for a clotted cream variation.

+ For a raw choc chip cookie, simply add cacao nibs or chunks of raw chocolate to the mixture, and form into flat discs instead of shortbread fingers. For a dehydrated version, click here.

+ serve with homemade cashew cream, runny coconut cream or coconut and ginger whip.

+ Try my raw caramel millionaire shortbreads.

SUPERFOOD MINCE PIES WITH DAIRY FREE CREAMS

Snacks, Sugar Free, Vegetarian, Gluten freedanielle coppermanComment

An incredible recipe for the perfect gluten, grain, dairy and sugar free mince pies. This recipe uses the most amazing gluten and dairy free pastry I have ever made, and the filling is a unique caramelly take on traditional mince meat. I was never a fan of mince pies growing up and always hated sultanas or currents in anything, picking them out excruciatingly from anything I found them in. This recipe doesn’t use conventional, high sugar dried fruits, but instead combines antioxidant rich super foods such as goji berries and dates with fresh blueberries. The dates make the texture of the filling incredibly caramelly, and the berries release a delicious flavour into the mixture which is absorbed by all of the other fruits as they cook.

+ Get ahead of yourself and make the dough now, which you can freeze or which will last in the fridge for a couple of days before you need to cook it.

INGREDIENTS
Makes 18 (base and top)

For the Crust
250g Buckwheat Flour
50g Ground Almonds
4 Tablespoons Coconut Oil, room temperature
Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt
2 Tablespoons Creamed Coconut Bar, melted (not essential, but delicious)
4 Tablespoons Agave, Date Syrup or Maple Syrup
1 Egg
1/2 teaspoon Bicarbonate Soda

For the Filling
4 Apricots, chopped
1 Tablespoon Vanilla Powder, Extract or Fresh Seeds
6 Dates, pitted and chopped
1/2 Green Apple, chopped
30g Goji Berries, optional
125g Fresh Blueberries
Handful Dried Blueberries, optional (can substitute for other dried fruit)
The Juice of half a Fresh Orange (and zest - optional)
1 Teaspoon Fresh Lemon Juice
1/2 Teaspoon Nutmeg
1 Tablespoon Cinnamon
1 Teaspoon Mixed Spice
1/2 Teaspoon Tumeric
1 Teaspoon Fresh Grated Ginger or Ground Ginger
1-2 Tablespoons Chia Seeds
3 Tablespoons Coconut Oil
1/4 Cup Water
1 Teaspoon Maca or Ginseng, optional

METHOD

Preheat the oven to 160c. Grease a muffin tin with a little coconut oil.
For the crust, place all of the ingredients but only half of the flour at this point, into a food processor or high speed blender. (To melt the bar of creamed coconut, simply fill a bowl with boiling water and place the sealed bar inside. Let it sit until the water has cooled enough for you to put your hands in it and then massage the bar to quicken up the melting process. Once melted, snip the corner with some scissors and measure out two tablespoons). If using a blender, add the wet ingredients first so the flour doesn’t clump around the blade, and blend on a high speed for 20-30 seconds. If the mixture isn’t completely smooth this doesn’t matter, just make sure the coconut oil is more or less combined. Transfer to a bowl and continue to mix the mixture, adding the remaining flour, until it is completely combined. Add a little more flour if it seems too sticky and wet, or a little more agave if it is too dry. Knead and fold the dough over itself on a floured surface, using the warmth of your hands to melt any small lumps of coconut oil that might remain. Roll the dough out until it is about 3mm thick. This pastry is easiest to work with freshly made and warmer rather than colder, so there is no need to store it in the fridge. The pastry is also a slightly unusual texture, both dry and doughy at the same time, so i find the best way to roll it out without it crumbling/breaking/sticking to the surface is to press down with the rolling pin, rather than just rolling and dragging. Work with it gently. Use a round cookie cutter to make you individual crusts, and use a thin, wide, sharp knife to separate the dough discs if they have become slightly stuck to the surface. Lay each circle into the muffin tin. Leave the leftover dough for the toppings. Bake for 6-8 minutes until the crusts begin to brown, but aren’t cooked through. Whilst they cook, prepare the filling.

For the filling, simply place all of the ingredients apart from the chia seeds into a medium saucepan on a low-medium heat. Stir constantly and burst the blueberries with the back of a wooden spoon. Simmer for 20-30 minutes, and add the chia seeds just before you take the mixture off of the heat. Take a tablespoon and fill each pre-baked crust. 

Roll out the remainder of your dough and use a cookie cutter (a star, a christmas tree or holly leaves work well but you can use a round one to make a sealed pie). Take each shape and arrange it on top of the mince mixture. Return to the oven and bake for a further 10-12 minutes, until the pastry is turning a golden brown.

To serve, dust with buckwheat flour or ground desiccated coconut, and serve with coconut cream, runny almond cream or with an extra dollop of mince meat if you have some left over.

'SINGLE' ALMOND CREAM

Ingredients
1 Cup Soaked Almonds (or cashews, macadamia and brazil nut work well too)
1/3 Cup Water
Vanilla, optional
Agave, optional
Himalayan Pink Salt, optional

Method
Simply blend the almonds and water together on a high speed for 2-3 minutes, until smooth. Pour the mixture through a fine sieve or, even better if you have one, through a nut milk bag or jam strainer. Return the strained mixture to the blender and add your flavours or sweetener of choice, if using. If the mixture is too thick for you, add a little more water to thin it. Blend again and then transfer to a serving jug. Pour over warm or cold puddings, over your breakfast or even into savoury dishes.

GINGER COCONUT WHIPPED CREAM

Ingredients
1 Tin Coconut Milk
1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla
1/2 Teaspoon Fresh Grated Ginger or Ground Ginger
1/2 Teaspoon Agave or Date Syrup

Method
Simply add all of the ingredients to a blender and blend until smooth - this will only take a few seconds. Transfer into a jar or container and set in the fridge for 1-2 hours until ready to serve

    SWEET POTATO CHEESEBOARD BISCUITS

    Snacks, Gluten free, Brunch, Breakfastdanielle coppermanComment

    INGREDIENTS
    Makes 15-20 Biscuits (depending on size)

    2 1/2 Cups Almond Meal
    3/4 Cup Buckwheat Flour
    1/2 Teaspoon Himalayan Pink Salt
    1 Teaspoon Bicarbonate of Soda
    1 Tablespoon Fresh Sage, chopped
    2 Sprigs of Fresh Rosemary, chopped
    1/2 Large Sweet Potato, steamed or baked, then pureed.
    1/2 Teaspoon Ground Chia Seeds, optional
    1/4 Cup Olive Oil
    1 Teaspoon Apple Cider Vinegar
    1 Tablespoon Agave or Date Syrup

    METHOD

    Start by baking the sweet potato at 200c for 45 minutes, or until completely soft. Meanwhile, mix the flours together in a large bowl. 
    When the sweet potato is soft, turn the heat of the oven down to 170c and puree it in a blender or food processor with the oil, salt, cider vinegar, fresh herbs, natural sweetener, until smooth. Pour the puree into the dry ingredients and mix with a wooden spoon. Add more buckwheat flour if the mixture is too sticky. Knead together and massage with your hands to help the ingredients come together. Flour a surface and roll out the dough until it is about 2-3mm thick. Use shaped cutters or a sharp knife to cut into circles or rectangles. Arrange on a baking tray lined with baking paper or greased with a little coconut oil.

    Bake for 15-20 minutes.

    BUCKWHEAT WAFFLES WITH COCONUT CREAM AND CACAO SAUCE

    Breakfastdanielle copperman1 Comment

    This recipe is quite something. I know what you're thinking; a recipe for waffles seems somewhat lost on a blog focussed on nourishing ingredients and healthy recipes. And you're right. A conventional waffle isn't allowed anywhere near this blog, but with a gluten-free buckwheat twist, a lack of sugar and not a mention of toffee sauce or whipped cream, it fits in just fine here. I've reworked this popular breakfast classic so that the words 'waffle' and 'nutritious' can exist in the same sentence.

    Not only is this buckwheat batter packed with antioxidants, protein and healthy fats, it is easy to make, stress-free and straightforward. You don't need a waffle maker (who has one anyway?) and can either make american style pancakes with this batter, or use a griddle pan to imitate the appearance and texture of fluffy waffles. 

    Like all pancakes and waffles, we're most interested in the toppings, lets face it. If you look in the cupboard on Sunday morning and find you are out of flour, you can't make the pancakes that you so wanted to snuggle up in bed with. If you look in the cupboard on Sunday morning and find you are out of maple syrup/raw organic honey/agave nectar/fresh lemons/nutella etc etc, you can't make those pancakes either. It would be insulting. A good waffle deserves a good topping, and a healthy waffle deserves a healthy topping. So for that reason I've provided a nourishing gluten, grain, dairy and refined sugar chocolate dipping sauce recipe, and also suggest you stock up on coconut yoghurt, berries, nut butter, coconut palm sugar and fresh lemon juice, before even thinking about making these.


    INGREDIENTS

    120g Buckwheat Flour
    80g Ground Almonds
    1 Tablespoon Cinnamon
    2 Medium Eggs
    200ml Almond Milk, Coconut Milk or Cashew Milk
    1/2 Teaspoon Baking Soda
    Pinch of Bicarbinate Soda
    2 Teaspoons Vanilla Seeds or Good Quality Extract
    1-2 Tablespoons Cashew or Almond Butter (not essential but advised)
    1 Tablespoon Coconut Oil

    METHOD

    Begin by whisking the eggs, milk and vanilla together in a large bowl, until combined. Add the flour gradually, and follow with the ground almonds, cinnamon, nut butter, salt and baking powders. Whisk again until the mixture becomes thicker and everything is smoothly incorporated. Melt the coconut oil and stir that into the mixture before whisking for a final time.

    eat a teaspoon of coconut oil in a large griddle pan, on a medium - high heat. Choose to make small round waffles (spooning the mixture onto the pan), a large waffle (more or less fill the griddle pan with a square of batter) or use the criss cross technique and drizzle the mixture in lines over itself. I love to create large square waffles and then cut them into 'soldiers' or long rectangles, ideal for dipping into sauce.

    Lower the heat a little and cook each side for about 6-8 minutes, until it is brown and the griddle pan is scolding lines across the surface.

    RICH CACAO DIPPING SAUCE

    INGREDIENTS

    6 Tablespoons Cacao Powder
    2 Tablespoons Coconut Oil
    2 Tablespoons Coconut Milk, solid
    1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla Seeds or Extract
    1 Teaspoon Agave or Coconut Blossom Nectar 

    METHOD

    Melt the coconut oil in a small saucepan and when it has melted, gently whisk in the cacao powder. When the cacao has dissolved, remove from the heat and stir in the coconut milk, vanilla and sweetener of choice. When all of the ingredients are combined and the sauce is smooth and beginning to thicken, pour into a bowl to serve.

    + Other Topping Suggestions

    Lemon infused coconut yoghurt with grated ginger and coconut palm sugar
    Nutella
    Nut Butter
    Agave or Coconut Palm Sugar with Lemon Juice
    Yoghurt and Berries
    Berry Chia Jam
    Wilted Spinach with Cashew Cream Cheese

    BLACKBEAN HOUMOUS

    Sugar Free, Vegan, Vegetarian, Gluten freedanielle coppermanComment

    I could never get tired of grazing. I love to snack and if theres any kind of dip in sight, I'm straight in there. Houmous is such a versatile dip and and something I was first introduced to by my father. My earliest memories of it are associated with Friday nights when he would come home from work a little earlier than usual, put on his favourite 'chill-out music' and crack open a tube of Pringles and a tub of trusty houmous. As well as this TGIF mood, I also associate houmous with other happy occasions, such as picnics, summer and having guests over. It was also my obsession during exam periods at school (a not-so-happy occasion), and I only wish i'd made it from scratch and experimented more with flavours then, as I would have gotten a lot more from it. This recipe not only uses protein-rich chickpea's which are a great source of natural energy, but also contains black beans (which contain yet more protein and aid digestion) and sweet potato (high in antioxidants and known to contribute to weight loss due it is high, high fibre content). So it may seem like a mere dip, a side to your meal or an afterthought, but in fact you're using an entire meals worth of vegetables in one dip. Well, what do you know? This houmous has become a concentrated source of wonderful nutrients.  There's almost no need for the rest of the meal, so rest assured that it is entirely acceptable to eat it on its own, by the spoonful. 


    INGREDIENTS

    4-5 Tablespoons Olive Oil
    1 Tin Chickpeas, drained
    1 Tin Black Beans, drained (can also use cannellini beans)
    1/2 Sweet Potato, chopped and steamed (optional - if you omit, just increase the bean quantity by 1/2 a cup)
    Small Handful Fresh Basil Leaves
    1-2 Cloves Garlic, chopped
    2 Tablespoons Smooth Tahini
    Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt
    1-2 Teaspoons Fresh Lemon Juice
    Handful of Fresh Basil or Rosemary

    Optional
    1 Tablespoons Nutritional Yeast

    METHOD

    Start by steaming the sweet potato. After about 8-10 minutes, when it is soft, add it to your blender. Now simply place all of the remaining ingredients into a high speed blender and blend for 2-3 minutes. Add more salt or lemon juice to taste and your choice of herbs (I like fresh basil, fresh rosemary and dried sumac). Scrape down the sides as the beans have a tendency to fly high, and blend for another minute or so, until the mixture is completely smooth and as creamy as is absolutely possible.

    SEEDED BUCKWHEAT BISCUITS

    Snacks, Gluten freedanielle coppermanComment
    BUC.jpg

    INGREDIENTS

    1/2 Cup Ground Almonds
    1 Tablespoon Nutritional Yeast
    2 Cups Buckwheat Flour
    1 Large Carrot
    Handful Fresh Basil, chopped
    2 Sprigs Fresh Rosemary, chopped
    Other Fresh Herbs of Choice, chopped
    2 Tablespoons Tahini
    1 Tablespoon Reishi Powder, optional
    1 Tablespoons Sunflower or Pumpkin Seed Butter (nut butter will work)
    5 Tablespoons Coconut Oil, room temperature
    1 Tablespoons Bicarbonate of Soda
    1 Clove Garlic
    2 Tablespoons Solid Coconut Milk or Dairy Free Yogurt
    2 Tablespoons Golden Linseeds
    2 Tablespoons Olive Oil

    METHOD

    Preheat the oven to 220c.
    In a large bowl, mix the flour, nutritional yeast, reishi and ground almonds together. Now add the coconut oil, mixing with your hands, then the coconut milk, tahini, seed or nut butter and the carrots. Combine thoroughly then add all of the herbs and seeds, along with the oil. When the mixture begins to resemble a dough, knead it momentarily and form it into a ball. 
    Roll out onto a floured surface, adding more flour if the dough is too sticky, to no more than 3mm thick. The thicker the dough, the softer the biscuits will be, but I prefer them thinner as they are much crunchier. Use a round cutter or a sharp knife to cut the dough into discs, rectangles or squares - however you would like to serve them. Arrange them on a baking tray, greased with a little coconut oil. Bake for 12-15 minutes, until they begin to turn golden.

    Serve with spreads like pesto, houmous and guacamole, or cheese, or sweet condiments like jams, chutneys, homemade nutella, raw honey, smashed fruit and nut butters.

    PUMPKIN PIE AND A POP UP

    Sugar Free, Vegetarian, Gluten freedanielle copperman6 Comments

    My first and only experience of pumpkin pie up until now was at my best friends house around the age of 13. With an american father, Thanksgiving is a big deal in their house, but I’d never really celebrated it before. At an awkward age of growth spurts and secondary school I almost didn’t even try the pie and tried to turn down the offer politely. It didn’t look especially appealing and i’d never tried it before, so naturally assumed it couldn’t be that special. Thankfully, her mother persuaded me and just one mouthful of that warm, homemade pie has remained a vivid memory in my mind ever since. I think a section of my brain is dedicated entirely to food, and times or occasions associated with certain foods. Sometimes i can even remember a conversation or event simply because i remember the food we were eating, or the restaurant we were in at the time. I can still see that pumpkin pie, fresh out of the oven, sitting on the countertop and can still smell the warmth of its spices. The sheer brilliance of pumpkin pie makes me wonder why it has taken me this long to attempt it myself. It is brilliant enough made with cheap pre-made pastry or shop-bought in festive packaging, but is even more brilliant if you make it by hand, with fresh pastry, and make it without any unnatural ingredients. So if you like that cream, the sugar and the buttery base, look away. You’re not going to like this version. Well, you’re not going to like the sound of this version, but if you do decide to trust me, you’ll realise it tastes just the same, if not better, than what you’re used to. 

    Before changing my diet i enjoyed baking brownies and rice crispy cakes on a regular basis - in fact, so often that i knew the recipes backwards, upside down and read with my eyes shut. I’d mastered two very amazing recipes, and they were easy, so making a pie seemed like an impossible task - some kind of art form i was certainly incapable of and which was definitely out of my league. But since i now use vegetables in baking and know how to make pastry with nuts and without gluten, I felt it was about time i revisited that moment in my best friends kitchen, embraced this seasons most delicious ingredients and made that classic holiday favourite, with a lot of things taken out, but with a whole lot of other good things added. 

    It’s hard for me to remember exactly how mama coleman’s pie tasted, but to me this one is all that a pumpkin pie should be. The base is different, as it is not real pastry. It is made without butter and with no flour - just nutritious nuts and nourishing coconut oil. Where most pies (especially shop bought pies) taste smooth and artificial, the base of this pie is crunchy, nutty and flavoursome. The filling is amazing, especially for people who are intolerant to gluten or just generally don’t desire the feeling of fullness that comes as a side effect of eating cakes. The filling is so smooth and light and, made with coconut oil and coconut milk, is a kind of creaminess you just can’t find in normal, artificial desserts. If theres one thing you make this winter, let this be it. Far better than chocolate, far better than mince pies and far better than the pumpkin pie you had last year. With this recipe, you can have your cake/pie/cheesecake/vegetables and eat them, all at once. Blissfully unaware that you are eating your way through the holidays to a healthier New Year, thanks to all the vitamins and minerals in pumpkin which will keep your immune system in check this winter. Eat up, it’s basically medicine. You neeeeeed it.

    INGREDIENTS

    Crust
    1 Cup Walnuts
    1/2 Cup Pecans
    1 Cup Buckwheat Flour
    1/2 Cup Coconut Oil, room temperature
    1/3 Teaspoon Salt
    1 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract
    2 Tablespoon Agave or Date Syrup
    1 Teaspoon Cinnamon

    Filling
    2 Cups Pumpkin, chopped (squash will work too) (if you haven’t the time or patience, buy some organic pumpkin puree from a local health food shop)
    2 Tablespoons Agave or Date Syrup
    1 Tablespoon Coconut Palm Sugar
    1/3 Teaspoon Salt
    1 1/2 Tablespoons Cinnamon
    1 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract
    1/2 Tin Coconut Milk (the solid part only)
    4 Tablespoons Coconut Oil, melted
    1 Egg
    2 Teaspoons Maca, optional
    1 Teaspoon Lucuma, optional

    METHOD

    Heat the oven to 200c.
    Start by roasting the pumpkin for the filling. Remove the skin and place in a roasting dish with a little splash of olive oil or some coconut oil, and roast for 25-35 minutes. It needs to be as soft as possible.

    Crust
    Once the pumpkin is cooked, reduce the oven temperature to 160c.

    Blend the nuts in a food processor or blender until they become a fine flour consistency. Pour into a medium bowl and add the flour, salt, vanilla and cinnamon. Mix together with a wooden spoon, then add the coconut oil, combining with your hands. The mixture should begin to form a dough. Make the dough into a ball and it should hold its shape. Take a round baking tray or cake tin, roughly 20cm in diameter (you can also use a rectangle dish if you don’t have a round one) and grease the bottom and the sides with a light coating of coconut oil. Press the dough into tin, making the base no more than 1cm thick, and making sure to press the dough around the sides too. Use a fork to pierce the dough in the middle, and bake for 15 minutes, until it begins to brown, and until it is dry to touch.
    Whilst it bakes, make the filling.

    Filling

    + TIP: Pumpkins with paler skins generally taste nicer and have a smoother less stringy texture when cooked. Look for crown princes or any with a greyish/blueish skin.

    Take the cooked pumpkin and place it in your blender or food processor along with the rest of the filling ingredients. I strongly advise using the egg and also maca if you have it, as the egg provides a vanilla-y flavour and a smooth texture and the maca adds an incredible malty caramel flavour. Blend all of the ingredients together until the mixture is smooth. Add a little more coconut milk or oil if the mixture needs help getting smooth.

    When the base is cooked, leave to cool for 5-10 minutes and then pour the filling mixture into it. Spread the filling evenly across the pie base, ensuring it reaches the sides too. Return to the oven and cook for 40 minutes, until the middle of the filling is firm to touch. If it is still quite wet or gooey to touch, leave it to cook for a little longer until you can be sure it is cooked through. The top should begin to brown and crack a little, and you should be able to stick a knife in the centre and bring it out clean. 

    Let cool for at least 20 minutes. I prefer it from the fridge as the filling becomes a wonderful consistency, but it is also delicious enjoyed warm. Serve with coconut yoghurt or coconut cream, fresh berries or a warm berry compote.

    + Save the Seeds 
    Pumpkin seeds also carry a lot of nutrients, so don’t throw them away. They are high in protein and fibre and also contain tryptophan which is a chemical compound that triggers happiness and positivity and reduces stress. Pumpkin seeds also contain anti-inflammatory properties and essential vitamins and minerals. Toss them in coconut oil or olive oil and your choice of natural sweetener and spices, or use nutritional yeast, tamari and dried herbs and spices to make a quick a savoury snack.

    BLEND AND PRESS POP UP

    I am excited to announce that next weekend i will be popping up and taking over Blend and Press in Neals Yard. I will be running an exclusive Model Mange Tout brunch menu, and i will be there from 10.30-1.30pm. Pop in and say hi, and choose from my nutritious gluten, grain, dairy and refined sugar free menu. I will be serving Cacao Chia Porridge with Almond Sauce and berries, Sweet Potato Cashew Pudding with Christmas Qnola, Cranberry and Rosemary Compote and Toasted Chestnuts, and Buckwheat Pancakes with Coconut Cream, Tahini and Cacao Sauce.

    Prices start from £4.95. Hope to see you there! Come in, keep warm and wake up well!

    LEMON, AMARANTH AND HONEY CAKE WITH AVOCADO FROSTING

    Snacks, Sugar Free, Vegetarian, Gluten free, Brunchdanielle coppermanComment

    Last weekend in Bath I took my delightful mother to a new coffee shop which apparently had been the talk of the little town for months. Bath is full of independent shops, cafes and eateries, and thankfully, to this day there is still only one Pret a Manger to its name. Don’t get me wrong, with its green juices, boiled eggs, kale chips and raw nuts, Pret is quickly becoming my favourite fast food coffee chain, but, there is nothing quite like a family-run cafe with irreplicable (is that a word?) character. 
    Bath’s finest cafes are cosy, welcoming, beautiful and unique, but of course, they’ve never heard of almond milk or dairy-free baked goods. Their produce is local and fresh and the food is always amazing, but until Mr Twitchett and his Roundhill Roastery came to fruition, the coffee was instant and the milk choices, satisfactory. It’s easy to find milk sourced from the local farmers, which is of course delicious in so many ways, however, if you are detoxing, giving up dairy or completely intolerant to it, your only option is going to be soy. Again, nothing wrong with that, but once you’ve tasted nut milk and are aware of such creamy, flavoursome concoctions of nutrients, there will always be a pang for it. Cue, Society Cafe.

    As I ordered our almond milk cappuccinos at the counter of Society Cafe in Kingsmead Square, a slice of Lemon, Polenta and Pistachio cake with exquisite beauty caught our eyes. I ordered it without giving it a thought and we sat in awe after our first mouthfuls, painfully vowing that we would wait to continue once our coffees had arrived. It was amazing, and straight away I wanted to create a grain-free, dairy-free and sugar-free version, using coconut milk and raw organic honey instead of butter and sugar. So thats what I done did.

    + I used amaranth instead of polenta as it is similar in physical features and I thought it would taste almost the same, and create a similar texture. I kept mine raw and I liked that the texture was quite bitty and crunchy, but boiling it first will soften it, making the cake smoother. Amaranth is a seed, similar to quinoa (you could probably use quinoa instead of amaranth, raw or gently boiled, if you don’t have amaranth). Amaranth is a complete protein, is full of vitamins and nutrients and is exceptionally high in fibre.

    (Guide to Bath coming soon).

    INGREDIENTS:
    Makes one large cake. Halve measurements if you want to make several small cakes or really tiny ones, in ramekins.

    200g Soft Coconut Oil
    150g Organic Raw Honey or Raw Agave
    200g Ground Almonds
    250g Amaranth, raw or boiled in water for no longer than 5 minutes, to soften
    1 Teaspoon Organic Baking Powder
    1 Teaspoon Psyillium Husk Powder
    3 Large Eggs
    1 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract
    The Zest of 2 Unwaxed Lemons
    Handful of Whole Raspberries or Blueberries, optional

    TO GLAZE:
    The Juice of Two Lemons 
    2 Tablespoons Raw Organic Honey or Raw Agave

    METHOD

    Preheat the oven to 180c.
    Beat the coconut oil and honey together in a medium bowl, using an electric whisk. In a separate bowl, mix the ground almonds, amaranth (raw or briefly boiled), baking powder and psyillium husk together. Beat 1/3 of the dry mixture into the coconut oil and honey, then beat in one egg. When combined, add another 1/3 of the dry mixture and another egg and beat until combined. Now add the final 1/3 of the dry mixture and the final egg, along with the vanilla extract, and whisk until fully combined. Stir in the lemon zest and pour the mixture into a tin or ovenproof dish, greased lightly with coconut oil.
    Bake for 35-40 minutes.

    Meanwhile, juice the lemons and pour the juice into a small bowl, with the honey or agave. Mix together until combined.

    Remove the cake/s from the oven and let cool before removing the cake from the tin and placing it gently onto a plate. Stab gently at the surface of the cake with a fork and pour the lemon and honey mixture over the cake. Watch it soak into the cake, then leave in the fridge until ready to serve (it becomes even more dense, chewy and moist in the fridge thanks to the coconut oil), or serve right away. I enjoyed it with Buckwheat Yoghurt (recipe on the Qnola website soon), but cashew cream or coconut yoghurt will suffice. And the frosting below isn’t mandatory, but it is certainly advised.

    OPTIONAL WHITE CHOCOLATE & AVOCADO FROSTING:
    100g Cacao Butter
    2 Ripe Avocados
    1 Tablespoon Raw Organic Honey or Raw Agave
    1/2 Cup Cashews
    1 Teaspoon Lemon Zest (or juice, for a stronger lemon flavour)

    + You can also used creamed coconut instead of the Cashews and Raw Honey or Agave.

    METHOD:
    Place the cacao butter and cashew nuts into a food processor or blender and blend for 2-3 minutes, until smooth. Now add the avocado, scraping at the flesh to gradually release it from the skin so as not to overwhelm the blender with large chunks. Add the sweetener and lemon zest and blend for another 1-2 minutes, until everything is combined and the mixture is smooth and a whipped consistency. Spread onto your cooled cake/s. This icing is prefect for any cake, and works especially well on cacao cake, banana bread and blueberry muffins.

    + If you don’t like lemon flavoured things, this cake works just as well without the lemon, and this frosting is delicious on the plain vanilla and berry sponge. Alternatively, you can use fresh orange juice instead.

    CANNELLINI WHITE BEAN AND SWEET POTATO QUISOTTO

    Vegetarian, Lunch, Dinnerdanielle coppermanComment

    November is here and, like most November’s, you’re probably cursing its premature arrival, certain that we should still be in October. November is a stressful month for many reasons. The weather gets colder, the days get darker, christmas gets closer and before you know it, the year is already over again. This means more colds, more early nights, more last minute shopping and get-together plans and more New Years Resolutions. It depends which way you look at it. Let’s forget all of that for a moment and think about the fact that food has never tasted so good, duvets have never felt so comfortable and staying in is far more enjoyable than going out anyway. This is the perfect time to wrap up indoors, to get creative with this seasons most nourishing foods and take time to make truly great food for you and your loved ones. Autumn is one of my favourite times of the year in terms of fresh produce. Everything is so hearty, earthy and flavoursome and I love cooking with soft vegetables and soft fruits, making everything into warm, nourishing concoctions.

    Now, although the weather is unusually warm for this time of year, there is still a sense of urgency to rush into the house after a long journey home and slam the door in the face of darkness. I mean, I started my journey home from one part of London at 3pm the other day and by the time I’d gotten back over ground, it was pitch black. The nights are chilly and the darkness makes me feel like we are living under some kind of winter blanket, even though I’m not wearing gloves yet. All I want to do is get into the kitchen and straight back out of it so I can enjoy some wholesome, homemade food from the comfort of my bed or on the sofa. There is nothing more soothing than a bowl of steaming goodness, like a hearty soup, a thick, creamy risotto or nourishing stew. And with any one-pot recipe, you can just keep adding to it. You can add spices and herbs, homemade stock or broth, spinach or kale that may look like it’s seen better days. In a one pot, everything combines into a unique amalgamation of flavours, food groups and most importantly, nutrients, so cram as much in as you can, and be sure to make enough for leftovers for times when hibernation seems more appealing than cooking. 

    This recipe is similar to my Crown Prince Quinoa Sotto - something I made over a year ago now, when I first started this blog. This recipe is quicker and easier though, as it doesn’t require cooking the sweet potato or pumpkin separately. You literally add everything to one big pan and let it all simmer together. Risotto was my favourite meal before i changed my dietary habits, but it always made me feel uncomfortable afterwards - too full to move and not especially nourished. This recipe doesn’t use cream, cheese, butter, sugar or processed risotto rice like most recipes do. It uses coconut milk, fresh herbs and quinoa, making it high in fibre, protein and low gi sugars, and low in starchy carbohydrates, grains, gluten and dairy (absolutely free from them, in fact). Enjoy playing around with this recipe, as there is always room to add more. I always add greens like spinach, diced broccoli or grated courgette as they cook down and become so soft you hardly notice them. 

    INGREDIENTS

    1 Tin Cannellini Beans
    1 1/2 Cups White Quinoa
    1 Tin Coconut Milk
    1/2 Cup Water
    1 Medium Sweet Potato (or pumpkin, squash or beetroot)
    1 Handful Basil, Sage or Coriander
    1-2 Tablespoons Nutritional Yeast
    Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt or 1 Teaspoon Tamari
    120g Chickpeas
    2 Cloves Garlic
    1 Teaspoon Lemon Juice
    2 Tablespoons Olive Oil
    3 Tablespoons Tahini
    1 Teaspoon Cumin
    1 Teaspoon Coconut Oil
    1/4 Teaspoon Fresh Chilli or Chilli Flakes

    OPTIONAL EXTRAS
    Cooked Puy Lentils
    Peas
    Spinach
    Kale
    Diced Broccoli
    Grated Courgette

    METHOD

    Start by making the quinoa as this is your base. Use a large saucepan leaving space for you to add and build, and cover the quinoa in twice its amount of water. Bring to the boil and then reduce the heat and leave it to simmer. 
    In a blender, blend the chickpeas, lemon juice, olive oil, cumin, garlic and 2 tablespoons of the tahini until smooth. This is a quick houmous recipe which adds a delicious creaminess to the sauce. You can also use shop bought organic houmous if you have it. Once smooth, set aside.
    When the water is draining away from the quinoa and it is more or less cooked, add the 1/2 cup water, the coconut milk (solid and liquid), the cannellini beans, grated sweet potato and fresh herbs and stir to combine. Keep on a low-medium heat, stirring constantly and adding water or plant milk if the mixture is becoming too thick. Add the salt or tamari and the nutritional yeast, then stir in the houmous and coconut oil. Stir constantly with a wooden spoon, adding your extra vegetables of choice. When everything is soft and all of the flavours have simmered nicely together, remove from the heat, season one last time and serve. 
    I like to serve mine with a dollop of coconut milk or cashew nut cream, or sprinkled with baked basil or kale chips for extra crunch. My Savoury Qnola, which will be available in the New Year, is also delicious on top.

    COLD BREW CASHEW COFFEE

    Sugar Free, Vegan, Vegetarian, Drinks, Breakfastdanielle coppermanComment

    INGREDIENTS

    1 1/2 Cups Ground Coffee
    1 Cup Cashews, soaked for at least 4 hours
    2 Cups Filtered Water
    1 Teaspoon Vanilla
    1/2 Teaspoon Date Syrup or Coconut Blossom Nectar
    Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt
    Cinnamon, optional

    METHOD

    To make the coffee, place the ground beans into a large jug or preferably an airtight, glass container or pitcher. Pour in 3 1/2 cups of filtered cold water and stir to combine. Cover with cling film or seal an airtight container with the lid and let sit for 12 hours, or up to as long as 1 1/2 days. The longer it brews, the stronger the flavour. 

    When the coffee has brewed, lay either a coffee filter if you have one or simply a sheet of kitchen roll over a fine sieve. You could also use a nut milk or jam straining bag, but the filters and kitchen roll ensure an entirely smooth result. Work with a small amount of the coffee at a time - as you will likely have to use several sheets of kitchen roll or several filters once they become too wet. Bit by bit, pour the coffee through whichever method of filter you are using, collecting the strained coffee in a jug or a bowl beneath. Repeat until all of the coffee has been strained. Discard of the ground coffee grains and rinse the container, returning the strained coffee to it for storage. Store in the fridge.

    For the cashew milk, place the soaked cashews and water into your blender and blend on a high speed for 2 minutes. Pour through a nut milk or jam straining bag into a jug. Squeeze and massage the nut mixture to extract as much 'milk' as possible. Rinse the blender and return the strained milk to it, adding the vanilla and sweetener and any other flavours you decide to use. Blend for a further 30 seconds and transfer to a bottle or an airtight liquids container. Chill before using, or if you are enjoying your latte warm, enjoy straight away. Simply heat the cold brew coffee in a small saucepan and whisk in the milk once the coffee becomes hot. Remove from the heat and stir vigorously, then enjoy.

    For an iced cashew latte, pour the cold brew coffee over some ice cubes followed by as much milk as you'd like. You can also blend the two together with the ice cubes for a 'frappe' consistency.

    BLACK BEAN SPAGHETTI WITH VEGETARIAN RAGU

    Vegan, Vegetarian, Gluten freedanielle copperman1 Comment

    Today I found myself walking past Planet Organic trying to think of something I needed, to give myself an excuse to go inside. I do this a lot, and every time I go to a health food shop for one thing, I exit with at least 4, and sometimes this doesn’t even include the thing I went in for in the first place. They are dangerous places, even more so when you’re hungry, or, like I was today, feeling creative and easily inspired.

    On my way to the till having picked up what I needed, I passed through the pasta isle. I used to eat pasta almost every day when I was at school. I would come home from school ravenous and make a bowl of pasta with cheesy baked beans. I know. Grim. But it tasted incredible. But since changing my diet, I haven’t had pasta once, and to be honest, my body doesn’t crave it. I admit my eyes do sometimes, as well as my nostrils. If i see a saucy pasta dish on a TV advert or walk past an Italian restaurant which smells as if it is actually built of basil and cheese, then I almost begin to miss it. However, in my opinion, it is always the sauce and the toppings that give a pasta dish any flavour at all. This is why I love making courgetti, because it is the same texture as regular spaghetti and doesn’t taste of much at all. The only difference is it isn’t doughy - other than that it tastes, in my opinion, just the same once it’s covered in sauce. The important thing is to keep the sauce relatively healthy too, monitoring your use of cream, cheese and processed meats. The recipe below is completely dairy free, vegan and vegetarian.

    Like most things in the shops, ‘healthy’ pasta is likely to contain a lot of ingredients you don’t recognise and these are ultimately things your body wont recognise either. All sorts of flours, stabilisers and emulsifiers may be present, amongst other ingredients. Most of these products are also high in starchy carbohydrate and sugar, and really aren’t that good for you at all. I tried Quinoa Spaghetti about a year ago now and loved it, but it still filled me up a little too much and although it was gluten and grain free, still felt quite stodgy to digest. So when I walked past Black Bean Spaghetti today, I had to investigate the packaging further. There were two ingredients: Organic Black Beans (92%) and Water (8%). This sounded instantly better than what surrounded it on the shelf as it was made for completely natural ingredients. No flour, not additives. Just beans and water. I was completely sceptical about putting it in my basket but felt so inspired that I had to give it a go. The store was out of turkey mince and I knew I had a fresh cauliflower at home, so I enjoyed mine with Cauliflower Ragu. Such a winner.

    INGREDIENTS
    A Packet of Black Bean or Edamame Spaghetti (ExploreAsian), or Homemade Courgetti
    6 Medium-Large Tomatoes
    15 Small Tomatoes
    Handful of Fresh Basil Leaves, chopped
    2 Handfuls of Spinach Leaves (or kale), chopped
    1 Large Garlic Clove, chopped or crushed
    1-2 Tablespoons Nutritional Yeast
    1/2 Teaspoon Salt
    A Few Sprigs of Fresh Rosemary
    1 Teaspoon Dried Mixed Herbs - Oregano, Sage and Thyme work well
    1/2 Large Cauliflower (you can also use quinoa instead which makes a delicious high protein vegetarian ragu with the same texture and consistency)

    METHOD
    Start by making the sauce as the courgetti will only take a few minutes and the black bean pasta only needs about 6 minutes to simmer. Chop the tomatoes into small chunks and pour a teaspoon or so of olive or coconut oil into a saucepan. Once melted, add the tomatoes to the pan followed by the basil leaves and the garlic. Stir in the spinach or kale along with the nutritional yeast, salt, dried herbs and other seasoning you may like to use. Cook over a medium to low heat for about 20 minutes. 
    Meanwhile, chop the cauliflower and make it into a rice consistency. Doing this will add texture to the sauce (as well as more vitamins and nutrients) and resembles the texture of mince meat very closely. Start by chopping the cauliflower edges into small pieces and place in a food processor or blender. Take the stalks and the tougher inside of the cauliflower and dice finely before adding to the blender. Blend for about 10-20 seconds. You only need to pulse it briefly as the pieces will break up instantly and you want to avoid making it into some kind of puree. 
    Once the sauce is reducing and becoming thicker, add the cauliflower rice or ‘mince’ to the sauce pan and stir until evenly coated. Simmer for another 15 minutes in order for the cauliflower to become a tiny bit softer and also to absorb the flavours of the sauce.
    Now make the ‘pasta’s’. Boil about 2 cups of water in a saucepan and then add the black bean spaghetti. I used about 1/5 or 1/4 of the packet for one serving. Simmer for 5-8 minutes, depending on how you prefer your pasta cooked. I like mine al dente so I drained mine after about 6 minutes. 
    Take your spiralizer or julienne peeler and start making the courgetti. You don’t really need both - i basically bought a courgette in case i really didn’t like the black bean pasta. But i did, so in the end i used both which obviously increased the variety of nutrients. I used just under half a courgette, peeled into spaghetti with my julienne peeler. You can also use a whole courgette if you don’t have/want black bean spaghetti, or you can leave the courgetti out if you just want to use the black bean spaghetti.
    Place the courgetti into a bowl and drain the black bean spaghetti. Add this to the courgetti and mix to combine with your hands. Give the sauce one last stir and season before pouring over the ‘pasta’s’. I recommend string the sauce through the pasta to coat it evenly. Top with a little nutritional yeast or organic cheese if you are not dairy intolerant, and add chopped pine nuts or seeds for extra flavour and texture and to further increase the nutrient content.

    DETOX TAHINI FLAPJACKS

    Snacks, Sugar Free, Vegan, Brunch, Breakfastdanielle copperman3 Comments

    These didn’t stick around long enough to be captured on camera. To be fair, i didn’t intend for them to last; they were more a desperate quick fix for one. I was sitting on the sofa after sprinting 2 and a half miles for the village May Day ‘jog’ - (does it get more British than that?) When i got home i was craving flapjacks, so i scoured my parents’ cupboards and came up with a healthy, chewy flapjack recipe made with whatever i could find. I used a mixture of quinoa flakes and organic gluten free oats. I usually avoid grains, so very rarely eat oats, but for a true flapjack consistency they really helped. I used to hate flapjacks and am still not a massive fan of oats but i went through a phase of adoring the golden, buttery mini flapjacks from M&S. Having now given up sugar, gluten, grains and butter, a healthy (or fussy) flapjack seemed near impossible, as the fundamental ingredients are sugar, grains and butter. However, with a little bit of coconut, anything can happen. These flapjacks are made with coconut oil instead of butter, agave instead of sugar or golden syrup and a rather unlikely ingredient - tahini. Tahini (sesame seed paste) is an incredible source of calcium, contains essential minerals and is high in methionine which detoxifies the liver. It is easy to digest, helps to maintain healthy skin and is higher in protein than most nuts. In this recipe it adds a bitterness to the flapjacks so they aren’t too sweet. Really the only reason you need the agave is to help the ingredients combine and stick together. The tahini also helps to bind the ingredients, possessing a similar consistency to cashew or almond butter (both of which you could use if you don’t have or like tahini). The flavours in these flapjacks may also seem unconventional and it may be hard to imagine them working together. However, the lemon juice adds an intense, zesty flavour and also helps to combine the mixture, and the ginger gives the flapjacks a little kick, as well as adding a vibrant sweetness. The fresh ginger adds to the chewy texture of these flapjacks and once baked becomes even juicer. Overall, these flapjacks are chewy, but not too gooey, sweet, but not too sweet, creamy, flavoursome and, of course, nutritious. Lemon helps to alkalise the body, aids digestion and flushes out toxins, and ginger has unbelievable health properties, such as detoxifying the body and improving the absorption and assimilation of essential nutrients in the body.

    INGREDIENTS
    3/4 Cup Organic Gluten Free Oats or Buckwheat Flakes
    1/4 Cup Quinoa Flakes or Buckwheat Flakes
    2 Tablespoons Desiccated Coconut
    1 1/2 Tablespoons Smooth Tahini
    1 Tablespoon Coconut Oil (can also use cacao butter to add a chocolatey flavour)
    3 Tablespoons Agave or Natural Sweetener of Choice
    1 Teaspoon Himalayan Pink Salt
    1 Teaspoons Organic Vanilla Extract
    1 Tablespoon Fresh Lemon Juice
    1-2 Tablespoons Organic Ground Ginger, depending on how much of a kick you can handle
    1 Tablespoon Fresh Ginger, grated or diced

    Optional
    1/2 Teaspoon Ground Cardamom
    1/2 Cup Goji Berries
    1/2 Cup Dried Blueberries or Dates or Apricots
    A few Handfuls of Nuts and Seeds of Choice
    1/4 Cup Cacao Nibs or Raw Chocolate Chunks

    METHOD
    Preheat the oven to 180c.
    Melt the oil, agave, vanilla, salt and tahini in a saucepan and stir with a wooden spoon until combined. In a separate bowl, mix the flakes, oats, fresh and grated ginger and desiccated coconut together. You could also add chia seeds at this point if you have them. Once the oil and tahini mixture has completely dissolved, remove from the heat and pour into the bowl of oats. Mix with a wooden spoon, making sure all of the oats and flakes are evenly and completely coated in the oil mixture. If the mixture is too dry, add a little more agave or lemon juice. If the mixture is too wet, increase the amount of flakes or oats, until the mixture sticks together if you press it down with the back of the spoon. Grease or line a small baking tray or heat proof dish. I would double the mixture if you have guests to feed as this amount made enough for about four people, but we could have eaten more! Press the mixture into the tray or dish until compact and even. Smooth the top with the back of the spoon and bake for 10-15 mins. Leave to cool completely before attempting to remove from the tin or cut into pieces. 
    Enjoy with a hot drink, freshly made almond milk or dipped into cashew pudding or smoothies.