WELL BEING & OTHER STORIES

Recipes, rituals and other stories to realign the body and mind

GRAIN FREE

COCONUT, MISO AND CARDAMOM BUCKWHEAT 'RICE' PUDDING

Sugar Free, Gluten free, Breakfastdanielle copperman11 Comments

From time to time there is a fine line between breakfast and dessert. This recipe represents one of those times. You could eat this for dessert at a gourmet restaurant, or you could eat this with your kids around the breakfast table on a sunday, in your pyjamas. It's up to you, but I know what I'd rather. I love all things breakfast, and although I don't always get time to make a good one during the week, my weekends are almost entirely centred around it. If I have a relatively calm weekend with not much going on, i'll take my sweet time getting out of bed, deciding what to make for breakfast, perhaps visiting the local grocery shop in clothes that certainly aren't socially acceptable, and then preparing, serving and enjoying a nutritious kind of feel-good feast. That's what weekends are for! The more people around the kitchen table and the more mouths to feed, the better.

This take on porridge is considerably creamier and has, in my opinion, a much more pleasant texture than oat porridge. Growing up, I hated porridge as I always got tough oats stuck in my teeth, and also, I hadn't been introduced to any of the ingredients I love now, so I was terribly unaware of how toppings could transform a sloppy, bland bowl of soggy oats into something I wanted to eat all day, all night and then again in my dreams. As well as being incredibly softer, plumper and creamier, buckwheat (a fibrous seed) is far more nutritious than oats - higher in (easily digestible) proteins, high in magnesium and, despite it's name, gluten and wheat free. It also helps control and reduce water retention in the body, and aids digestion.

To keep this breakfast/snack/dessert everything-free like the rest of ModelMangeTout, I use coconut or almond milk in this recipe instead of cows milk. Instead of sugar, you can incorporate coconut palm sugar/nectar, agave, stevia or raw honey (you may not need any sweetener at all - but I would recommend it for a dessert option). And, as with all porridge, you can get creative and play around with what you put in it, and on it, to make it more than just a bowl of stodge. In this recipe, I used miso and cardamom as they go really well with the coconut flavour from the milk, but you can use any herbs or spices and can add nuts, seeds, dried or fresh fruit and superfood powders of your choice.

INGREDIENTS
Serves 2 for breakfast, 4 for dessert portions

1 1/2 Cups Raw Buckwheat Groats, soaked overnight
5-6 Tablespoons Chia Seeds
2 Tablespoons Golden Linseeds/Flaxseeds - optional
1 Tin Coconut Milk
1/2 Cup Almond Milk (or water)
1 Tablespoon Agave/Coconut Nectar/Honey
2-3 Tablespoons Coconut Palm Sugar/Stevia (to taste) (can also use more agave/syrup if that's all you have)
1/2 Teaspoon Miso Paste (I like Clearspring)
1/2 Teaspoon Ground Cardamom
1 Tablespoon Coconut Oil
1 Teaspoon Vanilla Powder or Extract
1/2 Teaspoon Ground Ginger
1/2 Tablespoon Maca Powder

TOPPINGS PICTURED

Chopped Mango
Julienned/Peeled/Grated/Spiralised Kohlrabi
Solid Coconut Milk
Crushed Dried Hibiscus Petals
Coconut Blossom Nectar

METHOD

Make sure you have soaked your raw buckwheat groats overnight or for at least 8 hours. Rinse it thoroughly through a sieve then place it in a medium saucepan along with the the coconut milk and almond milk or water. Bring to the boil and then reduce the heat to medium/low. Simmer for 30-40 minutes (i should have warned you, this is certainly not the ideal breakfast for time-poor people, but if you make it one morning or over the weekend when you have more time, make enough to store in the fridge in jars or containers to grab-and-go on other mornings throughout the week). After 10 minutes, add the agave, coconut palm sugar, miso paste, chia seeds, linseeds (if using), cardamom, coconut oil, vanilla and ginger. Continue to simmer, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon. Add more miso or natural sweetener to taste, along with any other spices or super foods you fancy. I like adding dried goji berries or fresh blueberries whilst it is cooking, as they become soft and juicy, adding a refreshing flavour to the bowl.

Once the milks have more or less reduced and been completely absorbed by the buckwheat and the other seeds, remove from the heat and serve immediately, or leave to cool and store in airtight containers in the fridge until you are ready to enjoy. Reheat, or stir with hot nut milk or water before serving, or enjoy chilled. 

Top with more coconut milk or coconut cream, more berries or fresh fruit, and another teaspoon of coconut oil which will melt into it porridge wonderfully.

+ For dessert options, serve with cacao sauce, cacao avocado cream or almond caramel.

BUCKWHEAT WAFFLES WITH COCONUT CREAM AND CACAO SAUCE

Breakfastdanielle copperman1 Comment

This recipe is quite something. I know what you're thinking; a recipe for waffles seems somewhat lost on a blog focussed on nourishing ingredients and healthy recipes. And you're right. A conventional waffle isn't allowed anywhere near this blog, but with a gluten-free buckwheat twist, a lack of sugar and not a mention of toffee sauce or whipped cream, it fits in just fine here. I've reworked this popular breakfast classic so that the words 'waffle' and 'nutritious' can exist in the same sentence.

Not only is this buckwheat batter packed with antioxidants, protein and healthy fats, it is easy to make, stress-free and straightforward. You don't need a waffle maker (who has one anyway?) and can either make american style pancakes with this batter, or use a griddle pan to imitate the appearance and texture of fluffy waffles. 

Like all pancakes and waffles, we're most interested in the toppings, lets face it. If you look in the cupboard on Sunday morning and find you are out of flour, you can't make the pancakes that you so wanted to snuggle up in bed with. If you look in the cupboard on Sunday morning and find you are out of maple syrup/raw organic honey/agave nectar/fresh lemons/nutella etc etc, you can't make those pancakes either. It would be insulting. A good waffle deserves a good topping, and a healthy waffle deserves a healthy topping. So for that reason I've provided a nourishing gluten, grain, dairy and refined sugar chocolate dipping sauce recipe, and also suggest you stock up on coconut yoghurt, berries, nut butter, coconut palm sugar and fresh lemon juice, before even thinking about making these.


INGREDIENTS

120g Buckwheat Flour
80g Ground Almonds
1 Tablespoon Cinnamon
2 Medium Eggs
200ml Almond Milk, Coconut Milk or Cashew Milk
1/2 Teaspoon Baking Soda
Pinch of Bicarbinate Soda
2 Teaspoons Vanilla Seeds or Good Quality Extract
1-2 Tablespoons Cashew or Almond Butter (not essential but advised)
1 Tablespoon Coconut Oil

METHOD

Begin by whisking the eggs, milk and vanilla together in a large bowl, until combined. Add the flour gradually, and follow with the ground almonds, cinnamon, nut butter, salt and baking powders. Whisk again until the mixture becomes thicker and everything is smoothly incorporated. Melt the coconut oil and stir that into the mixture before whisking for a final time.

eat a teaspoon of coconut oil in a large griddle pan, on a medium - high heat. Choose to make small round waffles (spooning the mixture onto the pan), a large waffle (more or less fill the griddle pan with a square of batter) or use the criss cross technique and drizzle the mixture in lines over itself. I love to create large square waffles and then cut them into 'soldiers' or long rectangles, ideal for dipping into sauce.

Lower the heat a little and cook each side for about 6-8 minutes, until it is brown and the griddle pan is scolding lines across the surface.

RICH CACAO DIPPING SAUCE

INGREDIENTS

6 Tablespoons Cacao Powder
2 Tablespoons Coconut Oil
2 Tablespoons Coconut Milk, solid
1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla Seeds or Extract
1 Teaspoon Agave or Coconut Blossom Nectar 

METHOD

Melt the coconut oil in a small saucepan and when it has melted, gently whisk in the cacao powder. When the cacao has dissolved, remove from the heat and stir in the coconut milk, vanilla and sweetener of choice. When all of the ingredients are combined and the sauce is smooth and beginning to thicken, pour into a bowl to serve.

+ Other Topping Suggestions

Lemon infused coconut yoghurt with grated ginger and coconut palm sugar
Nutella
Nut Butter
Agave or Coconut Palm Sugar with Lemon Juice
Yoghurt and Berries
Berry Chia Jam
Wilted Spinach with Cashew Cream Cheese

LEMON, AMARANTH AND HONEY CAKE WITH AVOCADO FROSTING

Snacks, Sugar Free, Vegetarian, Gluten free, Brunchdanielle coppermanComment

Last weekend in Bath I took my delightful mother to a new coffee shop which apparently had been the talk of the little town for months. Bath is full of independent shops, cafes and eateries, and thankfully, to this day there is still only one Pret a Manger to its name. Don’t get me wrong, with its green juices, boiled eggs, kale chips and raw nuts, Pret is quickly becoming my favourite fast food coffee chain, but, there is nothing quite like a family-run cafe with irreplicable (is that a word?) character. 
Bath’s finest cafes are cosy, welcoming, beautiful and unique, but of course, they’ve never heard of almond milk or dairy-free baked goods. Their produce is local and fresh and the food is always amazing, but until Mr Twitchett and his Roundhill Roastery came to fruition, the coffee was instant and the milk choices, satisfactory. It’s easy to find milk sourced from the local farmers, which is of course delicious in so many ways, however, if you are detoxing, giving up dairy or completely intolerant to it, your only option is going to be soy. Again, nothing wrong with that, but once you’ve tasted nut milk and are aware of such creamy, flavoursome concoctions of nutrients, there will always be a pang for it. Cue, Society Cafe.

As I ordered our almond milk cappuccinos at the counter of Society Cafe in Kingsmead Square, a slice of Lemon, Polenta and Pistachio cake with exquisite beauty caught our eyes. I ordered it without giving it a thought and we sat in awe after our first mouthfuls, painfully vowing that we would wait to continue once our coffees had arrived. It was amazing, and straight away I wanted to create a grain-free, dairy-free and sugar-free version, using coconut milk and raw organic honey instead of butter and sugar. So thats what I done did.

+ I used amaranth instead of polenta as it is similar in physical features and I thought it would taste almost the same, and create a similar texture. I kept mine raw and I liked that the texture was quite bitty and crunchy, but boiling it first will soften it, making the cake smoother. Amaranth is a seed, similar to quinoa (you could probably use quinoa instead of amaranth, raw or gently boiled, if you don’t have amaranth). Amaranth is a complete protein, is full of vitamins and nutrients and is exceptionally high in fibre.

(Guide to Bath coming soon).

INGREDIENTS:
Makes one large cake. Halve measurements if you want to make several small cakes or really tiny ones, in ramekins.

200g Soft Coconut Oil
150g Organic Raw Honey or Raw Agave
200g Ground Almonds
250g Amaranth, raw or boiled in water for no longer than 5 minutes, to soften
1 Teaspoon Organic Baking Powder
1 Teaspoon Psyillium Husk Powder
3 Large Eggs
1 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract
The Zest of 2 Unwaxed Lemons
Handful of Whole Raspberries or Blueberries, optional

TO GLAZE:
The Juice of Two Lemons 
2 Tablespoons Raw Organic Honey or Raw Agave

METHOD

Preheat the oven to 180c.
Beat the coconut oil and honey together in a medium bowl, using an electric whisk. In a separate bowl, mix the ground almonds, amaranth (raw or briefly boiled), baking powder and psyillium husk together. Beat 1/3 of the dry mixture into the coconut oil and honey, then beat in one egg. When combined, add another 1/3 of the dry mixture and another egg and beat until combined. Now add the final 1/3 of the dry mixture and the final egg, along with the vanilla extract, and whisk until fully combined. Stir in the lemon zest and pour the mixture into a tin or ovenproof dish, greased lightly with coconut oil.
Bake for 35-40 minutes.

Meanwhile, juice the lemons and pour the juice into a small bowl, with the honey or agave. Mix together until combined.

Remove the cake/s from the oven and let cool before removing the cake from the tin and placing it gently onto a plate. Stab gently at the surface of the cake with a fork and pour the lemon and honey mixture over the cake. Watch it soak into the cake, then leave in the fridge until ready to serve (it becomes even more dense, chewy and moist in the fridge thanks to the coconut oil), or serve right away. I enjoyed it with Buckwheat Yoghurt (recipe on the Qnola website soon), but cashew cream or coconut yoghurt will suffice. And the frosting below isn’t mandatory, but it is certainly advised.

OPTIONAL WHITE CHOCOLATE & AVOCADO FROSTING:
100g Cacao Butter
2 Ripe Avocados
1 Tablespoon Raw Organic Honey or Raw Agave
1/2 Cup Cashews
1 Teaspoon Lemon Zest (or juice, for a stronger lemon flavour)

+ You can also used creamed coconut instead of the Cashews and Raw Honey or Agave.

METHOD:
Place the cacao butter and cashew nuts into a food processor or blender and blend for 2-3 minutes, until smooth. Now add the avocado, scraping at the flesh to gradually release it from the skin so as not to overwhelm the blender with large chunks. Add the sweetener and lemon zest and blend for another 1-2 minutes, until everything is combined and the mixture is smooth and a whipped consistency. Spread onto your cooled cake/s. This icing is prefect for any cake, and works especially well on cacao cake, banana bread and blueberry muffins.

+ If you don’t like lemon flavoured things, this cake works just as well without the lemon, and this frosting is delicious on the plain vanilla and berry sponge. Alternatively, you can use fresh orange juice instead.

CANNELLINI WHITE BEAN AND SWEET POTATO QUISOTTO

Vegetarian, Lunch, Dinnerdanielle coppermanComment

November is here and, like most November’s, you’re probably cursing its premature arrival, certain that we should still be in October. November is a stressful month for many reasons. The weather gets colder, the days get darker, christmas gets closer and before you know it, the year is already over again. This means more colds, more early nights, more last minute shopping and get-together plans and more New Years Resolutions. It depends which way you look at it. Let’s forget all of that for a moment and think about the fact that food has never tasted so good, duvets have never felt so comfortable and staying in is far more enjoyable than going out anyway. This is the perfect time to wrap up indoors, to get creative with this seasons most nourishing foods and take time to make truly great food for you and your loved ones. Autumn is one of my favourite times of the year in terms of fresh produce. Everything is so hearty, earthy and flavoursome and I love cooking with soft vegetables and soft fruits, making everything into warm, nourishing concoctions.

Now, although the weather is unusually warm for this time of year, there is still a sense of urgency to rush into the house after a long journey home and slam the door in the face of darkness. I mean, I started my journey home from one part of London at 3pm the other day and by the time I’d gotten back over ground, it was pitch black. The nights are chilly and the darkness makes me feel like we are living under some kind of winter blanket, even though I’m not wearing gloves yet. All I want to do is get into the kitchen and straight back out of it so I can enjoy some wholesome, homemade food from the comfort of my bed or on the sofa. There is nothing more soothing than a bowl of steaming goodness, like a hearty soup, a thick, creamy risotto or nourishing stew. And with any one-pot recipe, you can just keep adding to it. You can add spices and herbs, homemade stock or broth, spinach or kale that may look like it’s seen better days. In a one pot, everything combines into a unique amalgamation of flavours, food groups and most importantly, nutrients, so cram as much in as you can, and be sure to make enough for leftovers for times when hibernation seems more appealing than cooking. 

This recipe is similar to my Crown Prince Quinoa Sotto - something I made over a year ago now, when I first started this blog. This recipe is quicker and easier though, as it doesn’t require cooking the sweet potato or pumpkin separately. You literally add everything to one big pan and let it all simmer together. Risotto was my favourite meal before i changed my dietary habits, but it always made me feel uncomfortable afterwards - too full to move and not especially nourished. This recipe doesn’t use cream, cheese, butter, sugar or processed risotto rice like most recipes do. It uses coconut milk, fresh herbs and quinoa, making it high in fibre, protein and low gi sugars, and low in starchy carbohydrates, grains, gluten and dairy (absolutely free from them, in fact). Enjoy playing around with this recipe, as there is always room to add more. I always add greens like spinach, diced broccoli or grated courgette as they cook down and become so soft you hardly notice them. 

INGREDIENTS

1 Tin Cannellini Beans
1 1/2 Cups White Quinoa
1 Tin Coconut Milk
1/2 Cup Water
1 Medium Sweet Potato (or pumpkin, squash or beetroot)
1 Handful Basil, Sage or Coriander
1-2 Tablespoons Nutritional Yeast
Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt or 1 Teaspoon Tamari
120g Chickpeas
2 Cloves Garlic
1 Teaspoon Lemon Juice
2 Tablespoons Olive Oil
3 Tablespoons Tahini
1 Teaspoon Cumin
1 Teaspoon Coconut Oil
1/4 Teaspoon Fresh Chilli or Chilli Flakes

OPTIONAL EXTRAS
Cooked Puy Lentils
Peas
Spinach
Kale
Diced Broccoli
Grated Courgette

METHOD

Start by making the quinoa as this is your base. Use a large saucepan leaving space for you to add and build, and cover the quinoa in twice its amount of water. Bring to the boil and then reduce the heat and leave it to simmer. 
In a blender, blend the chickpeas, lemon juice, olive oil, cumin, garlic and 2 tablespoons of the tahini until smooth. This is a quick houmous recipe which adds a delicious creaminess to the sauce. You can also use shop bought organic houmous if you have it. Once smooth, set aside.
When the water is draining away from the quinoa and it is more or less cooked, add the 1/2 cup water, the coconut milk (solid and liquid), the cannellini beans, grated sweet potato and fresh herbs and stir to combine. Keep on a low-medium heat, stirring constantly and adding water or plant milk if the mixture is becoming too thick. Add the salt or tamari and the nutritional yeast, then stir in the houmous and coconut oil. Stir constantly with a wooden spoon, adding your extra vegetables of choice. When everything is soft and all of the flavours have simmered nicely together, remove from the heat, season one last time and serve. 
I like to serve mine with a dollop of coconut milk or cashew nut cream, or sprinkled with baked basil or kale chips for extra crunch. My Savoury Qnola, which will be available in the New Year, is also delicious on top.