WELL BEING & OTHER STORIES

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CARAMELISED COURGETTE, PEA, MINT AND MACADAMIA DIP

Seasonal, Sides, Snacks, Summer, Vegan, Vegetarian, Lunch, Recipe, Dips + Spreads, Dairy Freedanielle copperman1 Comment

I've been on and off home turf the past couple of months but everytime I do stop by I head straight for the kitchen to regurgitate information and inspiration gathered during my time away. Some things are inspired by new places and new cultures. Some things are inspired by local cuisine. Some things are inspired by seasonal produce. And some things are inspired by me just having too much time to myself to think about fun new things I could try when I get home.

This recipe is mostly inspired by the fact that we are in peak pea season, with some influence coming merely from me having had too much time to think about the things you could do with peas. I've made pea and mint houmous in the past and I'm a huge dip lover in general, as they require next to no thinking at all, and pretty much the same amount of effort. Dips and spreads are one of my favourite things to make purely because they are so easy and customisable. You can disguise any ingredients you don't like the taste of by combining then with ones you do, and you can also invent your own new combinations by simply getting creative with whatever you can find in the kitchen (within reason).

I've been wanting to develop some good summertime recipes (although it has seemed pointless since it still feels like winter in the UK), but have been caught up in the waves of life, and by that I mainly mean work. June felt like the heaviest month. The energy was low and dull, the weather was grey and practically everyone I know was feeling totally depressed about the EU Referendum results. I honestly believe that the energy of others around you has a huge effect on your own energy, even the energy of people you don't know. But, I also believe that seasonal produce provided by the Earth exists to help us cope with certain times of the year, by providing us with what we need, when we most need it. Natural, life-rich produce has transferrable energy. It has so much to give, and all we have to do to attain it is consume it.  I guess what I'm trying to say is, the peas are here to help. I had leftovers of this for breakfast this morning and the sun is currently out. It hasn't even rained yet today (!?). I'm feeling good about July already, and sending total Bye Felicia vibes to June.

INGREDIENTS

180g Garden Peas (cooked)
200g White Beans, Butter Beans, Cannelini Beans or Chickpeas
70g Olive Oil
20g Filtered Water
30g Avocado Flesh
100g Sliced Courgette, sauteed (can also substitue for sauteed broccoli or cauliflower)
Large Pinch Himalayan Pink Salt - to taste
15g Tahini
10g Fresh Spinach
1g Lemon juice
15g Macadamia Nuts (Pumpkin Seeds + Brazil Nuts would work well too)
6g Mint - optional but v v nice
1/2-1 Clove Garlic - optional (I am mildly allergic so I didn't include this but if you're into it I think it would be a sure)

METHOD

If using frozen peas, bring a small saucepan of water to the boil and add the peas. Simmer for about 5 minutes until soft, then strain and leave to cool. If your peas are pre-cooked and ready to go, start by sauteeing the courgette in a little olive oil and salt, over a medium heat. Meanwhile, blend the peas, your beans of choice, olive oil, water, salt, avocado flesh, tahini, spinach, lemon juice, nuts and mint and garlic - if using - in a high speed blender. Blend for about 1-2 minutes, using a tamper to get things moving properly. Keep an eye on the courgette and flip them as they begin to sizzle and brown. Once cooked well on both sides and soft in the middle, add them to the blender and blend for a further 1-2 minutes. Ideally, the blender should be able to run smoothly without the help of the tamper, as this will create the smoothest result. If it's really struggling, add a little more water.

Once you are happy with the texture, taste and season with extra lemon, garlic or salt, until you are happy with it. Transfer to a bowl or tuppaware and leave in the fridge to cool before serving.

To serve, drizzle with a little extra olive oil and either some chopped macadamia, sesame seeds or hemp seeds, dukkah or za'atar, to add a little crunch.

 

CHIA SEED PORRIDGE - FOUR WAYS

Snacks, Vegan, Vegetarian, Breakfastdanielle coppermanComment
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I don't even know how I have left it so long to post this recipe. It is by far one of my favourite breakfasts (also a perfect snack or dessert), and, providing instant yet long-lasting energy, is my go-to pre-workout meal. The combinations are endless, and the toppings are what really take things up a notch. The texture of chia seeds is unusual and completely unique. At first, people can be sceptical about even giving them a chance, as they look and feel unlike any other kind of food - and not in an appetising way. However, prepared the right way, chia seeds can become one of the most delicious sweet treats, and are packed with antioxidants, fibre, protein, healthy fats, vitamins and minerals. They swell when they are combined with a liquid, tripling in size, which means when you consume them they'll contribute to keeping you fuller for longer, without making you feel bloated or 'too full'. Additionally, they retain a lot of the liquid, keeping you sufficiently hydrated too. 

Below are just four simple recipes of my favourite flavour combinations. I serve these as warm porridges, but store the leftovers in the fridge and enjoy them for days as a cold chia seed pudding, for an instant, on-the-go breakfast and portable snack. This is also one of my favourite travel companions. The chia seeds soak up all of the liquid, so it doesn't leak from the container!

The most important component of these recipes is the milk. The cashew milk is thick and creamy and I've perfected this as a base for these recipes to create the softest and creamiest results. I have previously used coconut water and nut milks, but as they are quite thin liquids, the result is generally less creamy and doesn't bind as well. You want the gel of the chia seeds to really combine and merge together, and if the milk isn't thick enough, you'll end up with more chia seeds than you do gel (see the image of all four bowls above - the pink one without any toppings is made with normal coconut water and is a lot wetter - the chia seeds more separated - than the others. This was an experiment, but the recipe for the Beetroot Pudding below, is with the thicker milk, which I believe tastes better).

CHIA SEED PORRIDGE - FOUR WAYS   

 

VANILLA CINNAMON CHIA SEED PORRIDGE WITH CACAO ALMOND SAUCE

INGREDIENTS
(makes roughly 3 portions)

1 Cup Coconut or Almond Milk (can be tinned coconut milk, freshly homemade, or milk from a carton) 
5 Tablespoons Chia Seeds 
1 Tablespoons Date Syrup/Agave/Coconut Nectar/Organic Raw Honey
1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract/Bean Paste/Fresh Seeds
1/2 Cup Cashews, preferably soaked for 2-4 hours
1 1/2 Cups Cold, Filtered Water
1 Teaspoon Ground Cinnamon (can also experiment with using ginger or cardamom, or other spices of choice)
Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt

METHOD 

Start by preparing the milk. Blend the cashews with your the water and your chosen nut milk for 2-3 minutes, on the highest speed. Sieve the milk, either through a sieve or using a nut milk bag (cashews don't create much pulp though, so a sieve works fine). Pour the sieved milk into a medium saucepan and simmer on a medium heat. Add the chia seeds, vanilla, natural sweetener, salt, and cinnamon and stir constantly to ensure the seeds don't stick to the sides of the pan, or float on the top of the milk. Reduce the heat as the mixture begins to boil and thicken, and simmer for about 15-25 minutes. This will depend on the thickness of your milk and the exact quantity of chia seeds used. Stir regularly to make sure the mixture doesn't stick to the bottom of the pan. When all of the liquid has been absorbed and the mixture is thick and creamy - almost resembling rice pudding - remove from the heat and serve.

+ If the mixture seems too wet, add more chia seeds. If it seems to dry, add a little more water or nut milk, gradually.

CACAO ALMOND SAUCE

INGREDIENTS
(makes roughly 5 servings)

2 Large Tablespoons Almond Butter (can also try with cashew butter, other nut butters or tahini)
1/3 Cup Filtered Water
1-2 Tablespoons Date Syrup/Agave/Coconut Nectar/Organic Honey
Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt
1-2 Tablespoons Cacao Powder (depending on your taste preferences and how rich/bitter you like it)
1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract/Bean Paste/Fresh Seeds
1/2 Teaspoon Coconut Oil

METHOD

Simply heat the almond butter and water in a small saucepan, whisking constantly. Add your sweetener of choice, the salt, the coconut oil and the vanilla, and continue to whisk. Simmer on a low heat, whisk in the cacao powder, and when it has dissolved and fully combined, remove from the heat and serve.

+ This recipe is extremely quick. If you cook it for too long, it can quickly burn or begin to thicken too much. If it becomes too thick, try adding a little more water and sweetener.


BEETROOT INFUSED CHIA SEED PORRIDGE

INGREDIENTS
(makes roughly 3 portions)

1 Cup Coconut or Almond Milk (can be tinned coconut milk, freshly homemade, or milk from a carton) 
5 Tablespoons Chia Seeds 
1 Tablespoons Date Syrup/Agave/Coconut Nectar/Organic Raw Honey
1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract/Bean Paste/Fresh Seeds
1/2 Cup Cashews, preferably soaked for 2-4 hours
1 1/2 Cups Cold, Filtered Water
Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt
1 Tablespoon Beetroot Powder, or 2 Tablespoons Grated Raw Beetroot

METHOD 

Start by preparing the milk. Blend the cashews with your the water and your chosen nut milk for 2-3 minutes, on the highest speed. Sieve the milk, either through a sieve or using a nut milk bag (cashews don't create much pulp though, so a sieve works fine). Pour the sieved milk back into the blender, add the beetroot powder or the grated beetroot and blend for another 2 minutes. Then pour into a medium saucepan and begin to simmer over a medium heat. Add the chia seeds, vanilla, natural sweetener and salt, and stir constantly to ensure the seeds don't stick to the sides of the pan, or float on the top of the milk. Reduce the heat as the mixture begins to boil and thicken, and simmer for about 15-25 minutes. This will depend on the thickness of your milk and the exact quantity of chia seeds used. Stir regularly to make sure the mixture doesn't stick to the bottom of the pan. When all of the liquid has been absorbed and the mixture is thick and creamy - almost resembling rice pudding - remove from the heat and serve.

+ If the mixture seems too wet, add more chia seeds. If it seems to dry, add a little more water or nut milk, gradually


BLUEBERRY CASHEW MILK CHIA SEED PORRIDGE WITH FRESH BERRIES AND BLUEBERRY SYRUP

INGREDIENTS
(makes roughly 3 portions)

1 Cup Coconut or Almond Milk (can be tinned coconut milk, freshly homemade, or milk from a carton) 
5 Tablespoons Chia Seeds 
1 Tablespoons Date Syrup/Agave/Coconut Nectar/Organic Raw Honey
1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract/Bean Paste/Fresh Seeds
1/2 Cup Cashews, preferably soaked for 2-4 hours
1 Cup Cold, Filtered Water
Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt
1/2 Cup Frozen of Fresh Blueberries (can use mixed berries too)

METHOD 

Start by preparing the milk. Blend the cashews with your the water and your chosen nut milk for 2-3 minutes, on the highest speed. Sieve the milk, either through a sieve or using a nut milk bag (cashews don't create much pulp though, so a sieve works fine). Pour the sieved milk back into the blender, add the berries and blend for a further 2 minutes, until the mixture is smooth, and purple in colour. The pout the infused milk into a medium saucepan and simmer on a medium heat. Add the chia seeds, vanilla, natural sweetener and salt, and stir constantly to ensure the seeds don't stick to the sides of the pan, or float on the top of the milk. Reduce the heat as the mixture begins to boil and thicken, and simmer for about 15-25 minutes. This will depend on the thickness of your milk and the exact quantity of chia seeds used. Stir regularly to make sure the mixture doesn't stick to the bottom of the pan. When all of the liquid has been absorbed and the mixture is thick and creamy - almost resembling rice pudding - remove from the heat and serve.

+ If the mixture seems too wet, add more chia seeds. If it seems to dry, add a little more water or nut milk, gradually

BLUEBERRY SYRUP

INGREDIENTS
(makes roughly 3 servings)

1 Cup Blueberries
1 Cup Raspberries
Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt
1/2 Cup Water

1 Teaspoon Fresh Lemon Juice
2 Tablespoons Date Syrup/Agave/Coconut Blossom/Organic Honey

METHOD

Start by blending the berries with the water, on a high speed for 2 minutes. When smooth, transfer to a medium saucepan. Add the lemon juice, salt and sweetener of choice and whisk to combine everything. Bring to the boil and then simmer for 20 minutes, adding a little more lemon juice and a little more sweetener if the mixture is too watery. Once it has thickened, serve, or pour into an airtight jar and store in the fridge.


CACAO CHIA SEED PORRIDGE WITH SALTED CARAMEL ALMOND SAUCE

INGREDIENTS
(makes roughly 3 portions)

1 Cup Coconut or Almond Milk (can be tinned coconut milk, freshly homemade, or milk from a carton) 
5 Tablespoons Chia Seeds 
2 Tablespoons Date Syrup/Agave/Coconut Nectar/Organic Raw Honey
1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract/Bean Paste/Fresh Seeds
1/2 Cup Cashews, preferably soaked for 2-4 hours
1 1/2 Cups Cold, Filtered Water
1 Teaspoon Ground Cinnamon (can also experiment with using ginger or cardamom, or other spices of choice)
Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt
2 Tablespoons Cacao Powder 

METHOD 

Start by preparing the milk. Blend the cashews with your the water and your chosen nut milk for 2-3 minutes, on the highest speed. Sieve the milk, either through a sieve or using a nut milk bag (cashews don't create much pulp though, so a sieve works fine). Pour the sieved milk into a medium saucepan and simmer on a medium heat. Add the chia seeds, vanilla, natural sweetener, salt, and cacao powder and stir constantly to ensure the seeds don't stick to the sides of the pan, or float on the top of the milk. Reduce the heat as the mixture begins to boil and thicken, and simmer for about 15-25 minutes. This will depend on the thickness of your milk and the exact quantity of chia seeds used. Stir regularly to make sure the mixture doesn't stick to the bottom of the pan. When all of the liquid has been absorbed and the mixture is thick and creamy - almost resembling rice pudding - remove from the heat and serve.

+ If the mixture seems too wet, add more chia seeds. If it seems to dry, add a little more water or nut milk, gradually

SALTED CARAMEL ALMOND SAUCE

INGREDIENTS
(makes roughly 5 servings)

2 Large Tablespoons Almond Butter (can also try with cashew butter, other nut butters or tahini)
1/3 Cup Filtered Water
1-2 Tablespoons Date Syrup/Agave/Coconut Nectar/Organic Honey
Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt
1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract/Bean Paste/Fresh Seeds
1/2 Teaspoon Coconut Oil
1/2 Teaspoon Ground Cinnamon or Ginger - optional
1/2 Teaspoon Maca (or other superfoods of choice) - optional

METHOD

Simply heat the almond butter and water in a small saucepan, whisking constantly. Add your sweetener of choice, the salt, the coconut oil and the vanilla, and continue to whisk. Simmer on a low heat, whisk in the spices and superfood powders, if using, and when it has dissolved and fully combined, remove from the heat and serve.

+ This recipe is extremely quick. If you cook it for too long, it can quickly burn or begin to thicken too much. If it becomes too thick, try adding a little more water and sweetener.


VEGAN AND NUT-FREE AVOCADO MAYONNAISE

Snacks, Summer, Vegan, Vegetarian, Lunchdanielle copperman3 Comments
 

Mayonnaise is another one of those things that, when you embark upon a healthier journey through life, you think, 'God, I'm gonna miss you'. I certainly did. Before i knew anything about food and the importance of feeding our bodies sensibly, I had mayonnaise with everything. I whenever I had it, it covered my entire plate, not just a small fraction of it as it was designed to have done.

This recipe seriously puts mayonnaise to shame. Homemade mayonnaise isn't actually that unhealthy, as long as you use organic, free range eggs and good quality oils. However, it takes a bit of effort. Shop bought mayonnaise is mainly just chemicals, emulsifiers, additives and colourings in a bottle. So, seriously, do not eat it. This recipe is made with actual, real ingredients. The main ingredient is avocado, which is high in protein, fibre and healthy fats. The texture of the avocado combined with the oil is even creamier than normal mayonnaise, and makes the egg yolk you find in conventional mayonnaise recipes really unnecessary. This recipe is ridiculously simple and quick. All you need is to ensure the avocados are so ripe they are almost inedible, and a blender which will do the work for you. No hours of hand whisking involved!

INGREDIENTS

2 Ripe Avocados (preferably so soft that you wouldn't actually want to eat them on their own)
1/2 Cup Olive Oil
1 Teaspoon Fresh Lemon Juice
A Gentle Splash of Apple Cider Vinegar
Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt

+ OPTIONAL
Organic Wasabi Paste (Biona), Fresh Garlic, Black Pepper, Capers, Nutritional Yeast

METHOD

Slice the avocado in half, tap your sharp knife into the stone and pull it out. Score each half of the avocado vertically and horizontally and then gently scoop or squeeze out the flesh. Place the flesh into a blend or food processor along with the lemon juice, salt, apple cider vinegar and any other herbs or spices you choose to use. Blend on a medium speed. Gradually add the olive oil, a few drops at a time. Add more and more, until the mixture combines. It should be blending smoothly and should become thick. As you add more oil, increase the speed of your blender or food processor. Blend smoothly for 1-2 minutes, scraping down the sides if you need to.

Serve cold as a condiment for meat, fish, raw vegetables, salads, crackers, gluten free toast, eggs, quinoa or buckwheat burritos, or as a dip for raw vegetables and sweet potato chips/wedges.

 

HEALTHY COCONUT AND CASHEW CUSTARD DREAMS

Snacks, Sugar Free, Summer, Vegan, Vegetarian, Gluten freedanielle copperman2 Comments

Healthy snacks are hard to come by. They are hard to find in cafes, even harder to find in supermarkets or convenience stores and seemingly hard to make yourself. It is for this reason the title of this post - healthy custard cream biscuits - probably seems like some kind of un-amusing joke. You've probably never felt less enthused or more hopeless about something in your life. However, having mastered several other gluten, dairy and refined sugar free shortbread recipes, you should feel comfortable in my hands. I've only made these biscuits three times. Once as an experiment, once again to share around my agency (IMG Models) during London Fashion Week, and then a final time on demand, requested by Laney Crowell, who flew all the way to London from New York just for one bite (and kind of to oversee a shoot; but mainly in pursuit of the custard cream close ups I'd teased her with on instagram a few weeks beforehand). She just needed them. And I may not know you well, but I do know you need them too.

The biscuits are one of my favourite things I've ever made. I almost wish they would develop some kind of flaw, as, when I make them, I can't stop eating them, and when they're gone, I can't stop thinking about them. The biscuit is completely gluten free, made with buckwheat flour and ground almonds (although you can leave the almonds out if you want to make a nut-free version). The filling is incredibly easy too, and made with cashew and coconut is full of healthy fats (omega 3 fatty acids), protein, fibre and antioxidants. If you make one thing for guests or one thing for someone who refuses to believe healthy food can be delicious, make it a batch of coconut and cashew custard creams.

INGREDIENTS
Makes Roughly 45 Biscuits (20-25 finished biscuits using 2 either side of the filling)

180g Coconut Oil
1 Teaspoon Tahini
50-60g Coconut Palm Sugar
4 Tablespoons Agave
Salt
1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract, Bean Paste or Fresh Vanilla Seeds from a Pod
200g Buckwheat Flour
4 Tablespoons Ground Almonds

FILLING
Makes enough for 45 Biscuits

1 Bar Creamed Coconut, melted
30g Raw Cashew Nuts (you can replace theses with another bar creamed coconut for a nut-free alternative)
3 Tablespoons Solid/Soft Coconut Oil 
1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla Bean Paste or Vanilla Seeds from a Fresh Pod
Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt
2 Tablespoons Solid Coconut Milk - optional
1 Teaspoon Coconut Sugar, Nectar, Agave, Date Paste or Raw Honey

METHOD

Lets start with the biscuits. Preheat the oven to 160c. Use a chunk of solid coconut oil to grease 2 flat baking trays.

I'll warn you now that the biscuit dough seems to hold together differently every time i make these. I think it depends on the heat of my hands, the moisture, the texture of the coconut oil and just generally how the dough is feeling. If it isn't cooperating, it can be quite frustrating. That said - every single time i have made these, they have worked impeccably.

Start by using an electric whisk to beat together the coconut oil and the coconut palm sugar. Make sure the coconut oil is soft not melted, and not rock hard. To soften it if it is too cold, place it in a plastic sandwich bag and wrap the bag in a flannel or towel soaked in hot water. Squeeze and massage the oil until it becomes slightly softer.

Once the oil and coconut sugar have come together into a light, fluffy mixture (it will be darker than the usual cake batter you are used to, due to the coconut palm sugar) add the salt, agave, tahini and vanilla before gradually adding the buckwheat flour and the ground almonds.

Continue to whisk and when the mixture becomes too doughy to whisk, use a wooden spoon or you hands to combine everything. Once all of the ingredients are coming together, use you hands to knead the dough slightly, and form into a large ball. Squeeze and massage the dough until it holds together nicely. If it is too dry or too crumbly, add a little more agave. If it is really too dry, add a tiny bit of extra coconut oil. If it is too oily, wet or sticky, add more buckwheat flour. For me, I notice that the biscuits cook best with more flour, however dry the mixture may seem. So try to keep the mixture quite dry, working it with your hands as much as possible to encourage it to bind. It may take a few minutes of kneading to get it to where it needs to be.

Leave aside for 10-20 minutes in a tightly squeezed ball. Don't place it in the fridge as the coconut oil will cause it to stiffen rapidly.

Lightly flour a dry surface and roll out half or a quarter of you dough at a time. Using a rolling pin, roll the dough out, using a lot of pressure to encourage the dough to stick together, until it is no more than 4mm in depth. Use your cutter of choice (I use the lid from a jar of coffee which is more or less the perfect rectangular shape. You can also use a knife to cut out shapes, although this is rather laborious and time consuming).
+ Use a thin, sharp knife or a metal spatula to peel each biscuit off of the surface if it become stuck.

Place each raw biscuit onto your prepared baking tray. Place in the over for 10-15 minutes. This will depend on your dough (i.e: if you felt inclined to add more flour or more agave). Check the biscuits after 10 minutes, and then again after 12, as if they don't seem ready after 10 minutes, they can cook incredibly quickly. Although they taste perfectly fine a little over cooked, this isn't ideal.

Whilst the biscuits are cooking, make the cream filling. Keep an eye on the biscuits though, as, like i said, they can become overdone quite quickly. Place the bar of creamed coconut in a bowl or jug of boiling water. Make sure the plastic that it comes in isn't pierced or broken. Leave for 3-5 minutes to melt completely, and as the water cools enough to touch, massage the packet to help disperse the chunkier bits. 

Place the melted creamed coconut, raw cashew nuts, salt, vanilla, coconut milk, if using, and the coconut oil into a high speed blender. Blend for 1-2 minutes, starting on a low speed, and going to the highest. A tamper is really useful for getting the mixture going, if you have one. If it is not blending smoothly enough, add a little more coconut oil and/or coconut milk. Don't add melted coconut oil or water though as the mixture will separate.
+ Add a teaspoon of agave or coconut sugar to taste, if you have a sweeter tooth.

Scrape the cream into a bowl and set aside until the biscuits have cooked and cooled. Don't place it in the fridge as it will solidify and will be impossible to work with. Keep stirring the mixture whilst the biscuits cool.

Remove the biscuits from the oven when they begin to turn a golden brown. They will probably become darker than you imagined but this is normal. If they are still soft to touch, don't worry - they will become incredibly crunchy as they cool, so don't be tempted to put them back into the oven unless they are still really soft and pale.

Leave to cool before sandwiching the cashew coconut cream between them. Simply take a small teaspoonful of the cream and spread it gently onto the centre of one biscuit. Then place another biscuit on top, press the two together gently and place in the freezer to set.

Repeat until all of the biscuits have been used up, and place them all in the freezer to allow the centre to solidify slightly. You can enjoy them at room temperature too. 

+Store in the freezer or fridge in an airtight container.

+ Add ground or fresh grated ginger to the biscuit mixture for a Ginger Crunch Cream variation.
+ Add cacao to the biscuit dough for a Bourbon Biscuit or Oreo Variation
+ Add cacao and 1 tablespoons Agave to the cashew cream for a Bourbon Biscuit variation or just for a more chocolately treat in general.


EASTER EGG SHORTBREADS

Snacks, Sugar Free, Vegan, Vegetarian, Gluten freedanielle coppermanComment

Shortbreads, despite their three main components being butter, sugar and white flour, have proven to be one of the easiest things to make healthily. I substitute the butter with coconut oil, the sugar with coconut palm sugar or natural fruit sugars/syrups, and the white flour with buckwheat flour, oat flour, or nuts ground into a flour consistency. From there, it is easy to add other ingredients to increase the nutritional profile of your biscuits even more - such as superfood powders, raw vegetables and linseeds/flaxseeds or chia seeds. You can also very easily make these into savoury or sweet biscuits, simply reducing the amount of coconut palm sugar or syrup used for savoury biscuits (and adding vegetables, more flour and nutritional yeast for a cheesy flavour), or increasing the coconut palm sugar or syrup quantities to your personal taste, and adding things like low fructose dried fruit and super foods like maca and cacao. Once you've got the base down, you can add pretty much anything.

And you don't have to skip the icing either! Creamed coconut is a mysterious ingredient and, as it sets, resembles sugar icing almost exactly. I actually prefer it, as it has a nicer texture, a creamier flavour and doesn't leave a strange aftertaste or sugaring coating in your mouth after you've eaten it. While some of the colouring items are quite an investment, they're definitely worth it. I alternate adding each one to smoothies, porridge and soups as well.

-  View the full recipe on WOMENSHEALTHMAG.CO.UK  -


BROCCOLI AND CELERIAC BRAZIL NUT SLAW

Snacks, Vegan, Vegetarian, Gluten freedanielle copperman2 Comments

An incredibly refreshing, vibrant side of seasonal ingredients combined with a creamy, dairy-free sauce high in healthy fats and plant-based protein. This slaw is amazing served alongside other salads, plain protein sources such as salmon or chicken, served with quinoa or vegetable burgers and falafels, or enjoyed as it is. A perfect condiment for picnics in the summer or to refresh a warming meal in the winter - experiment with using whichever vegetables are in season. Celeriac adds the perfect crunch to this slaw, but you can substitute it for cabbage, kohlrabi or courgette throughout the summer.

INGREDIENTS

100g Brazil Nuts or Macadamia Nuts
1/2 Cup Water
Salt or Tamari, to taste
Tahini
4 Tablespoons Olive Oil
Nutritional Yeast
1 Teaspoon Lemon Juice
Apple Cider Vinegar
1 Clove Garlic, crushed
1 Tin Coconut Milk, solid
1/3 Broccoli, grated
1/2 Cauliflower, grated
1 Large Shredded Celeriac

METHOD

Start by making the slaw sauce. Place the brazil nuts into your blender with the water and blend on a high speed until smooth, for 2-3 minutes. Pour the 'milk' through a nut milk or jam straining bag into a jug, to strain it smoothly. Rinse the blender before returning the milk to it, along with the other ingredients. Blend on a high speed for a further 2 minutes. Taste, and season with more salt, garlic or lemon juice depending on your personal tastes. When you are satisfied with the flavour, leave to chill in the fridge temporarily whilst you prepare the vegetables. Grate the broccoli and cauliflower, and shred the celeriac in a food processor, with a mandolin slicer or with a large blade on your grater. In a medium bowl, combine the vegetables and pour the cheesy brazil nut sauce over them, tossing and massaging the sauce into the vegetables with your hands, to ensure everything is evenly coated.

Serve immediately. Will last 2-3 days in the fridge, but sauce tends to separate if left too lone.

COURGETTE AND SPINACH CREPES

Snacks, Vegetarian, Lunch, Gluten free, Dinner, Brunch, Breakfastdanielle copperman1 Comment

When i was a child, i thought that pancakes literally came from heaven. i made them every weekend and used to dowse them in maple or golden syrup, peanut butter, or sugar and lemon. It began to be less about the pancakes and more about the toppings.

They are delicious, and the best thing about them is how easy they are to make. I used to make 3 ingredient crepes which just involved whisking the mixture and pouring it into the pan. As my tastebuds and nutritionally hungry mind have developed, i have found ways of making these pancakes with as many ingredients as possible. And by that, i don’t mean artificial additives. I add fruit and vegetables to my pancakes these days, and substitute white flour and cows milk for creamy nut milks and nutritious, fibrous, high-protein seeds (amaranth, millet, buckwheat, quinoa) or their flaked versions. I also add as many super foods as possible, and only sweeten the pancakes with natural, unrefined syrups or coconut palm sugar. Although these green crepes are savoury and i don’t use any sweetener at all, you could very easily make them sweet, as the crepes themselves have a very neutral flavour, and don't taste as spinach-y as they look! You could top them with fruit, natural syrups of your choice or raw nutella, but I prefer these for lunch or dinner, topped with vegetables, salad, tahini and other dressings.

Happy pancake day! 

INGREDIENTS
(makes 10-12 large crepes)

220g Buckwheat Flour
3 Eggs
2 Cups Coconut Milk or Almond Milk
1 Cup Water
1 Tablespoon Coconut Oil, melted
Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt
2 Large Handfuls Spinach or Watercress
1 Tablespoon Fresh Basil Leaves
1 Cup Courgette, grated or spiralled
1/2 Teaspoon Spirulina or Chlorella
1/2 Teaspoon Charcoal Powder, optional
Coconut Oil, for frying

METHOD

Simply place all of the ingredients into a high speed blender. Add the milk and the eggs first to avoid the flour becoming a lump and clogging the blade. Blend on a high speed for about 1-2 minutes, until the mixture is smooth and becomes a pale green. Once completely smooth, heat a heaped teaspoon of coconut oil in a frying pan. When it has melted, pour the crepe mixture directly from the jug of your blender (less washing up!) and spread the mixture out evenly across the pan by moving and rotating it gently. Don't use too much mixture at once of the crepe will be too thick and cakey. Pour in enough to cover the middle of your pan, leaving about 2 inches between the edges of the pancake and the sides of the pan. Then spread the mixture to make it slightly larger, and thinner. Cook for about 3 minutes, then flip with a spatula and cook on the other side. The pancake should begin to brown and crisp ever so slightly at the edges. You may need to flip it over several times to get it exactly right and cooked through.

Repeat until you have used all of the mixture, or store any leftover batter in the fridge, in a jug covered with cling film or an airtight container. I'd advise you to cook them all at once though, so you'll always have the foundations of a healthy snack, breakfast, lunch or dinner, when you're short for time.

+ Serve with Chanterelle Pate, Tahini Avocado Cream or simple mashed avocado, Carrot Sesame Dressing, Red Pepper Houmous, Pure Tahini and fresh or steamed vegetables. These are also amazing with Pea Houmous, Bean Slaw and Celeriac Broccoli Slaw.

CARROT SESAME DRESSING

INGREDIENTS

2 Carrots, grated
Juice of 1/2 Orange
1/2 Teaspoon Lemon or Lime Juice
1/2 Teaspoon Tamari or pinch of salt
4 Tablespoons Olive Oil 
1 Tablespoon Cold Water
2 Tablespoons Sesame Oil
1/2 Teaspoon Ground Ginger or fresh ginger, grated
1/4 Teaspoon Ground Turmeric or 1/4 teaspoon grated fresh turmeric
2 Tablespoons Goji Berries, optional (can substitute for 1/2 teaspoon honey)

METHOD

Soak the goji berries, if using, in a small bowl in just enough boiling water to cover them. Let sit for 5 minutes, to soften. Place all of the other ingredients into your blender, adding the goji berries once they become soft, and blend together on a high speed for 2-3 minutes, until the carrot is no longer lumpy, and the mixture becomes smooth and thin.

Season to taste.

+ Thicken with tahini if you want a thicker dip/dressing. Or blend 1/2 ripe avocado in with the rest of the ingredients.

PARSNIP, CELERIAC AND QUINOA BURGERS

Snacks, Vegetarian, Gluten free, Brunchdanielle coppermanComment

These patties are a quick and easy way to get in plenty of vegetables, vitamins and nutrients. Blenders are a godsend for many reasons, one of them being that they make it possible to disguise and/or completely reinvent vegetables into something far more delicious and flavoursome. Making pesto with kale or spinach and adding vegetables to homemade houmous are two of my favourite quick and easy blender recipes, as well as vegetarian burgers and patties, like these. The great thing about both pesto/spreads and burgers/patties is that they are both perfect for using up leftovers too. There are no real foundations, meaning you can add pretty much anything to them, and as long as they stick and combine properly, you’ve got a vibrant and filling meal in an instant. If in doubt - make patties. They are total crowd pleasers. You can serve them as snacks or canapés, starter or sides, or make a real meal out of them and serve them with plenty of sides as you would a normal burger. These are great in the summer, but just as good during the winter when the best ingredients are in season, and in abundance.

INGREDIENTS
Makes 8-10

2 Parsnips, grated
1 Carrot or 1/2 Sweet Potato, grated
1/2 Celeriac, grated
5 Medium Spinach, Kale or Broccoli Stems, chopped
1 Egg
180g Quinoa, cooked
1/2 Cup Sunflower Seeds or Nuts of Choice
1 Clove Garlic
60g Cup Buckwheat Flour
1/4 Cup Ground Almonds
1 Tablespoon Fresh Dill
1 Tablespoon Fresh Rosemary
1 Tablespoon Fresh Thyme
3 Tablespoons Olive Oil
2 Tablespoons Nutritional Yeast
1 Teaspoon Sumac
1 Teaspoon Ground Coriander
Pinch Salt

METHOD

Preheat the oven to 160c. Line a baking tray with baking paper, or grease the tray with a little coconut oil.

Blend the sunflower seeds in a blender or food processor for 10 seconds. Add the greens or broccoli and garlic and blend for about 20 seconds until everything is finely chopped.

Transfer to a large bowl, and grate in all of the vegetable ingredients. Mix to combine and then add the cooked quinoa, fresh and dried herbs, flours, salt, oil, egg and nutritional yeast. Mix with a wooden spoon and bring the mixture together with your hands once it has reduced in stickiness. 

If the mixture is too wet, add more buckwheat flour or ground almonds. If it is too dry, add a little extra oil. Form the mixture into flattened burger shapes, or into small balls if you wish to make them more like falafels.

Place them on your prepared baking tray, careful not to place them too close together. Bake for 20-30 minutes.

GOJI TAHINI DRESSING

INGREDIENTS
1/2 Cup Goji Berries
3 Tablespoons Tahini
1 Teaspoon Apple Cider Vinegar
Juice of Half an Orange
1/2 Teaspoon Ground Ginger or Fresh Ginger, grated
1/2 Teaspoon Raw Honey
3 Tablespoons Olive Oil
2-3 Tablespoons Water

METHOD
Start by softening the goji berries. Place the berries in a small bowl and cover them with boiling water. Leave to sit for about 5-10 minutes, then drain the berries and put them into your blender or food processor. Add the rest of the ingredients and blend on the highest speed for 2-3 minutes. If the mixture seems to thick or isn’t becoming smooth enough, add a little more water, but the longer you blend it for the smoother it will become.

Serve from a jug as a dressing or in a small bowl as a dip.

SAVOURY TAHINI DIP

INGREDIENTS
3 Tablespoons Tahini
5-6 Tablespoons Olive Oil
1/2 Teaspoon Lemon Juice
1/2 Teaspoon Tamari
1/4 Teaspoon Ground Ginger
+ Sweetener of choice, optional

METHOD

Simply mix all of the ingredients in a small bowl or add to a blender and blend on a slow speed until combined.

MARINATED KALE, BRUSSELS AND CABBAGE CHIPS

Snacks, Gluten freedanielle coppermanComment

This recipe is great for any crisp lovers, or kale chip lover for that matter. Using seasonal vegetables and a festive favourite, these brussels sprouts become the perfect consistency to satisfy any ‘crunch cravings’. Some people just need something to munch on, and often a salty snack does the trick. Depending on how long you cook or dehydrate the brussels for, they will become extremely crunchy and, if stored correctly, will last up to a week, maybe even more. Play around with your own flavours. I like Tamari and Balsamic Vinegar or Nutritional Yeast, Lime and Tahini. 

INGREDIENTS
150g Large Brussels Sprouts, chopped Cabbage or Chopped Kale
2 Tablespoons Olive Oil or Coconut Oil
Generous Sprinkling of Himalayan Pink Salt

FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS

Tamari and Oil
2 Tablespoons Tamari and 3 Tablespoons Olive Oil or Coconut Oil. You can also add black or white sesame seeds to add to the crunch.

Tamari and Balsamic Vinegar
2 Tablespoons Tamari, 1 tablespoon Balsamic Vinegar, 3 Tablespoons Olive or Coconut Oil, 1/2 Teaspoon Lemon Juice and an optional 1/2 Teaspoon Agave or natural sweetener of choice. 

Nutritional Yeast, Lime and Tahini
2 Tablespoons Nutritional Yeast, 1 Tablespoon Smooth Tahini, 2 Tablespoons Olive Oil, 1/2 Teaspoon Lime Juice, Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt

Garlic, Chili and Paprika
1 Tablespoons Garlic Granules, 1/2 Teaspoon Chili Flakes, 1 Teaspoon Paprika, 1 Teaspoon Tumeric, 3 Tablespoons Olive Oil or Coconut Oil

METHOD
Choose one of two methods. The i-need-a-snack-now method, which takes about 25 minutes, or the lets-dehydrate-these-brussels-properly method, which can take up to 6 hours.

METHOD ONE
Preheat the oven to 150c.
Wash your brussels sprouts and chop the bottoms off, allowing the outer leaves to separate. These will be your chips. Peel each brussels carefully so as not to tear any leaves, and place the largest leaves into a medium mixing bowl. Take as many leaves off as you can without too much effort, then chop the bottoms again to release a few smaller leaves. Once all of the brussels have been peeled, store the small inside balls for use in salads or to enjoy with another dish, and add your chosen flavours to the bowl of leaves. Toss the leaves in your chosen flavours and massage with your hands to ensure each is evenly coated. Spread evenly on a baking tray lined with baking paper and bake for 12-25 minutes. The timings will depend on your choice of flavours. Be sure to stir the leaves after about 10 minutes to ensure they don’t stick and to make sure they cook evenly. 

METHOD TWO
Preheat the oven to 60-80c.
Wash your brussels sprouts and chop the bottoms off, allowing the outer leaves to separate. These are your chips. Peel each brussels carefully so as not to tear any leaves, and place the largest leaves into a medium mixing bowl. Take as many leaves off as you can without too much effort, then chop the bottoms again to release a few smaller leaves. Once all of the brussels have been peeled, store the small inside balls for use in salads or to enjoy with another dish, and add your chosen flavours to the bowl of leaves. Toss the leaves in your chosen flavours and massage with your hands to ensure each is evenly coated. Spread evenly on a baking tray lined with baking paper and bake for 2-8 hours. The longer the leave them, the longer they will stay crispy. I baked mine for only 1 hour and they were delicious enjoyed straight away, but they won’t keep for long.

Store in an airtight container, in a dry place (not in the fridge).

SEEDED BUCKWHEAT BISCUITS

Snacks, Gluten freedanielle coppermanComment
BUC.jpg

INGREDIENTS

1/2 Cup Ground Almonds
1 Tablespoon Nutritional Yeast
2 Cups Buckwheat Flour
1 Large Carrot
Handful Fresh Basil, chopped
2 Sprigs Fresh Rosemary, chopped
Other Fresh Herbs of Choice, chopped
2 Tablespoons Tahini
1 Tablespoon Reishi Powder, optional
1 Tablespoons Sunflower or Pumpkin Seed Butter (nut butter will work)
5 Tablespoons Coconut Oil, room temperature
1 Tablespoons Bicarbonate of Soda
1 Clove Garlic
2 Tablespoons Solid Coconut Milk or Dairy Free Yogurt
2 Tablespoons Golden Linseeds
2 Tablespoons Olive Oil

METHOD

Preheat the oven to 220c.
In a large bowl, mix the flour, nutritional yeast, reishi and ground almonds together. Now add the coconut oil, mixing with your hands, then the coconut milk, tahini, seed or nut butter and the carrots. Combine thoroughly then add all of the herbs and seeds, along with the oil. When the mixture begins to resemble a dough, knead it momentarily and form it into a ball. 
Roll out onto a floured surface, adding more flour if the dough is too sticky, to no more than 3mm thick. The thicker the dough, the softer the biscuits will be, but I prefer them thinner as they are much crunchier. Use a round cutter or a sharp knife to cut the dough into discs, rectangles or squares - however you would like to serve them. Arrange them on a baking tray, greased with a little coconut oil. Bake for 12-15 minutes, until they begin to turn golden.

Serve with spreads like pesto, houmous and guacamole, or cheese, or sweet condiments like jams, chutneys, homemade nutella, raw honey, smashed fruit and nut butters.

GREEN SUNFLOWER PESTO

Snacks, Vegan, Vegetariandanielle coppermanComment

I know it’s a bold statement but my first homemade pesto - and not just homemade pesto but healthy, nutritious, dairy-free pesto - turned out to be the best pesto I’ve ever tried. Since experiencing this variation of pesto i have come to realise that normal shop-bought pesto is far too oily and bitty. Another thing i dislike about it is the inclusion of cheese which i try to avoid as i don’t eat much dairy. If i’m going to eat cheese it’s going to be a huge slice of locally sourced cheese covered in chutney. That would be worth it. But in pesto i think it is pretty unnecessary, especially when the option of nutritional yeast is available, which adds a nutty, cheesy taste similar to parmesan, but also boasts an abundance of nutrients and high levels of vegan protein, to entirely upgrade your pesto (and most other savoury recipes).
On top of that, many supermarket brands of Pesto use sugar and preservatives which are unnatural and can be detrimental to health. You also must be careful when choosing pesto to make sure it is made with natural oils such as extra virgin olive oil and not with artificial, hydrogenated fats such as vegetable oil. You’re safest and healthiest bet is to buy organic or local, homemade pesto, or make it yourself (its as easy as a smoothie)!

This pesto is a lot creamier than most brands of pesto due to the sunflower seeds and avocado i use. Sunflower seeds are an amazing base for sauces and creams and add a unique texture to this condiment. I also substituted pine nuts for pistachio nuts as i love their intense flavour and thought it would work well with the sunflower seeds. As well as basil I used a large handful of spinach leaves to increase the nutritional value of the recipe and also to thicken it a little. This pesto is incredibly healthy and is high in healthy fats (from the avocado, nuts and seeds), protein (from the nuts, seeds and nutritional yeast) and antioxidants (from the spinach, garlic, avocado, lemon, basil and spirulina). It also contains alkalising properties due to the use of lemon, leafy greens and spirulina and contains a diverse range of vitamins, minerals and fibre from all of the natural ingredients.

Enjoy as a spread, as a dip for vegetables or sweet potato chips, as a side or condiment for most meals including fish, meat or eggs, and incorporate into savoury sauces or soups for extra flavour. And throw out the Sacla.

INGREDIENTS

1/2 Cup Sunflower Seeds
1/2 Cup Pistachio Nuts
Large Handful Fresh Basil Leaves
Large Handful Kale or Spinach, diced
1/2 a Ripe Avocado
1/2 Cup Avocado Oil or Olive Oil
Salt
1-2 Cloves of Garlic, chopped
1-2 Tablespoons Nutritional Yeast
1 Teaspoon Fresh Lemon Juice
Pinch of Spirulina (optional)

METHOD

Add the sunflower seeds, pistachios and a tablespoon of the oil to a blender and blend for 5 minutes. When the mixture begins to become smooth, add the avocado (best to chop it first), basil leaves, spinach or kale, garlic, nutritional yeast, salt, lemon juice and the rest of the oil (as well as the spirulina, if using). Blend again for a further 2-3 minutes until the mixture is smooth and all ingredients are combined. You may need to scrape the sides. I quite liked mine with a few chunks in it but if you prefer a smoother spread, continue to blend until you are happy with the consistency. Scrape from the blender into a bowl and season with more salt or lemon or spirulina or nutritional least until you are happy with it. 
Cover with cling film and store in the fridge. It may become slightly dark on the outside due to the avocado oxidising but just stir before serving and it will be absolutely fine

TAHINI PEPPERCORN SAUCE

Sugar Free, Vegan, Vegetariandanielle coppermanComment

You can make anything taste good with a little sauce. My sister once said “you can’t skimp on sauce” and for some reason this quote has stuck with me ever since. But I totally agree. There is nothing worse than ordering a meal or a salad or a burger, even, and it being delivered under-sauced. It probably has something to do with portion control, and quite rightly, perhaps, as many people don’t know when to say when with mayonnaise (people being, me). But, when does it become acceptable to go overboard on the condiments? When they’re healthy, wholesome and natural, that’s when. I always went overboard with things like bread or apple sauce with a roast or mayonnaise with sweet potato chips, but now I like to make sauce the main part of my meal, in an entirely acceptable way. There are more vegetables in my pesto than there are on my plate these days, but that’s the sheer beauty of natural, nourishing gastronomy. You get filled up by an unbelievably delicious amalgamation of the most nutritious ingredients. You can serve a kale, spinach and cashew nut pesto over your child’s pasta and they’ll have no idea it’s full of vegetables. Job done.

A sauce, spread, dip or dressing has the ability to completely transform an otherwise soulless meal. A salad, for example, which is where most people start when reconditioning their dietary habits, is instantly better with a little extra virgin olive oil and lemon juice. This is what I settled for for so long, convincing myself actually, salad can be tasty. But then I discovered other natural oils, tahini, tamari, ginger and avocado, and have realised these ingredients will never fail you. A bowl of salad or warm vegetables with a knob of coconut oil and a twist of himalayan pink salt is probably the simplest way to do it. Mix the oil with smooth tahini, a dash of tamari, some ginger and a drop of agave and you’ve instantly got not only a delicious, vibrant mixture of freshly coated leaves or vegetables, but an even more nutritious one too. The thought of people disallowing themselves a little salad dressing kills me when I can think of a hundred ways you can make your own, if you just get to know the right ingredients. Yes, salad dressing is bad. It’s full of sugar, emulsifiers, thickeners, flavourings and additives and has little to no nutritive value at all. But make coconut oil, avocado oil, extra virgin olive oil, tahini, tamari, nut butter, ripe avocados, nuts, seeds, fresh herbs, sesame oil, fresh or ground ginger and agave frequenters in your kitchen and you’ll want to eat salad for the rest of your life. Protein-rich, high in healthy fats and abundant in vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and micronutrients, you’ll find it hard to believe they can do you good. We’ve all had this conversation: “Why is everything that tastes good so unhealthy, and everything that’s good for you, just boring?” Honestly, I’m still coming to terms with this too, but it really is possible to eat delicious food that can do your body a million favours or more. It may cost a little more, it may take a little research, but your body and your taste buds will thank you in the end, and your mood, energy, skin and metabolic processes will instantly improve.

PEPPERCORN TAHINI

Everyone craves a steak now and then, I know that as a fact. I have vegetarian friends who have never eaten steak in their lives who, oddly, still crave it from time to time. And what is steak without peppercorn sauce? Well, its like a green juice without any vegetables, isn’t it?

Made conventionally with butter, cream, a little more cream and lots of seasoning, its hardly the epitome of clean eating. So I’ve developed and reworked this classic condiment, using coconut oil, coconut milk, tahini and organic mustard. Get your grass-fed meat or a bowl of hearty vegetables and you’re good to go. The most important thing to remember when reconditioning your dietary lifestyle is that there are no rules, and if you come across any, avoid them at all costs. Yes, steak would spring to mind first at the mention of peppercorn sauce in a word association game, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy it with other things. I poured mine over warm puy lentils, and imagine it tastes beautiful stirred through a warm green salad or quinoa, studded with pomegranate seeds or blueberries for extra flavour. Here’s to improvisation in the kitchen…

INGREDIENTS:

5 Tablespoons Smooth Dark Tahini
2 Tablespoons Olive Oil
1 Tablespoon Coconut Oil or Organic Ghee (safe for lactose intolerant eaters)
1/2 Teaspoon Peppercorns, ground
1 Teaspoon Peppercorns, whole
1 Teaspoon Onion Seeds (or onions if you prefer)
1 Tablespoon Nutritional Yeast
1 Clove Garlic, diced
1/2 Tin Coconut Milk, room temp (one part solid cream one part liquid), or COYO Natural Yoghurt
1 Teaspoon Mustard
1/2 Teaspoon Tamari
1 Bay Leaf
Chopped Tarragon
2 Tablespoons Hot Water
2 Shallots, optional (can also use onions)

METHOD:

Heat a little olive oil and coconut oil in a saucepan and add the garlic along with the shallots or onions, if using. Sauté until they start to become golden, then add the peppercorns, tamari, mustard, bay leaf, tarragon, onion seeds, nutritional yeast and mix until combined. Next, add the cream, gradually, along with the hot water and a little salt and/or extra nutritional yeast depending on your taste. Simmer the sauce for 2-3 minutes until it begins to reduce and thicken slightly. Heat until it starts to bubble then remove from the heat and pour through a sieve into a serving jug to catch the peppercorns, bay leaf and shallots/onions, if using, to make the sauce smoother.

Store in the fridge for up to a week, but stir before serving as it will separate and may stiffen slightly. Enjoy hot or cold.

Photo credit | Tommy Clarke

RED PEPPER POURING HOUMOUS AKA THE NEW BBQ SAUCE

Snacksdanielle coppermanComment

Earlier this summer in June i attended my first Brai - that’s a barbecue to you and i. Brai is a South African term and translates directly to grill. Just 5 minutes into arriving at the Brai with my sister, I understood why they had their own name for it. It was not an ordinary barbecue. Ordinary barbecues at their best include marinated chicken, some hearty salads, corn on the cob and insanely unhealthy desserts. But more common barbecues, if we’re lucky enough to see the sun at all in England, consist of burnt 30%- meat sausages, plastic cheese in plastic films, rain, more rain and far too much alcohol. A Brai is an entirely different game. We had marinated shrimps the size of my hand, barbecued mackerel, turkey burgers, onglet steak, barbecued bone marrow, teriyaki salmon kebabs and much, much more. The food was brought out over the course of about 8 hours. This, i thought, was brilliant. No one was filling up on Walkers crisps with cheese and chive dip. People were pacing themselves and really savouring and appreciating each individual dish. The burgers were not ordinary burgers either. They were layered with fresh cheese, spinach and the best sauce i have ever tasted. That’s where this story becomes relevant to the following recipe.

INGREDIENTS
Halve this recipe for a single serving.

6 Tablespoons Tahini
1 Ripe Avocado
1 Tin Chickpeas or 4 Tablespoons Organic Houmous
6 Tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil
2 Cloves Garlic
1/4 Cup Water (Use only 1 tablespoon if you want a thicker houmous)
2 Large Peppers
4 Large Tomatoes
1 Teaspoon Tamari
1/2 Teaspoon Lemon juice

Optional:
A Few Leaves Fresh Basil

METHOD
Preheat the oven to about 180c. Cut the peppers into quarters and the tomatoes too. Place them in the same baking tray with a little olive oil or coconut oil, and salt. Roast in the oven for about half an hour, then turn the heat up to 200c and roast for another 20 minutes, until the peppers are soft to touch, the skin looks baggy, and the tomatoes are soft. Remove from the oven and run under cold water. When they have cooled, peel the skins off of the peppers as much as you can. Don’t worry about doing this for the tomatoes.
Place the vegetables into your blender with 1/8 cup of water, the oil and the garlic. Blend for 2 minutes. Scrape down the sides, then add the remaining ingredients and the rest of the water, if you think it needs it. The water thins the mixture and helps the ingredients to combine as smoothly as possible. If you want more of a proper houmous dip (pictured below), leave the water out, although you may find you need it in order for the mixture to combine fully. If you want more of a pouring houmous, add as much water as you desire, and up the seasoning to maintain the flavours.
Serve as a dip for vegetables, crisps, sweet potato chips or as a side with chicken, beef or salmon. Pour over courgetti, salmon and ragu, add to sauces or soups, or stir through a quinoa/buckwheat salads.

BRAZILIAN NUT BUTTER

danielle coppermanComment

Nut butter has a unique effect on people. I’ve witnessed it many times and know from experience exactly how it feels to taste your first spoonful of nut butter. Not Peanut butter, because that really isn’t nut butter at all. Peanuts are actually a legume and one i steer pretty clear of as they are exceptionally susceptible to certain moulds and fungi that are associated with the development of cancer. Yes, peanut butter is amazing and it brings back cheerful memories of primary school packed lunches and the first time you tried it with jam, but people only think that because they’ve never tried almond butter and frankly don’t know what they’re missing. I never loved peanut butter but i also never knew almond butter existed. This was ignorant mistake number one. I had never even thought of, let alone heard of almond butter, so as soon as i tried it i clung onto it and decided it was to be a permanent part of my life. This was ignorant mistake number two. I settled for almond butter without questioning where the macadamia or the cashew butter was at. I discovered an entire world of nut butters and seed butters and felt a pang of anger at the very thought of all those people who had no idea they existed. Having become familiar with home made almond butter which is incredibly easy, I set about making my own blends as an even more delicious version of the raw nuts themselves. It is the easiest thing to make and you can mix and match your choice of nuts and flavours. Add agave, desiccated coconut and/or cinnamon for a more flavoursome almond butter, or introduce crushed garlic and salt for a savoury option.

INGREDIENTS
100g Raw Brazil Nuts
100g Raw Cashew Nuts

METHOD
Chop the brazil nuts in half and place them into a high speed blender along with the cashew nuts. Blend for 1minute on a high speed and then lower the speed to encourage the mixture to blend. After 2 minutes, scrape down the sides of the blender and stir the mixture from around the blade to renew it with less smooth parts. Blend again on a low to medium speed until the mixture begins to soften and the nuts release their oils. If your mixture is still dry and crumbly, i’d advise helping it along with a teaspoon of melted but cooled coconut oil, or flaxseed, grapeseed or avocado oil. If you added oil, blend a final time for 1-2 minutes until the mixture is moving smoothly around the blade and combining together. Scrape the mixture into a jar, pot or bowl and store in the cupboard or int the fridge. This blend is amazing added to smoothies, stirred through chia seed pudding, served on warm coconut porridge or enjoyed with cold salmon fillet or chicken.

SMOKED SALMON PATE

Sugar Free, Gluten free, Breakfastdanielle coppermanComment

Salmon is such a nourishing food. Growing up, i refused to eat fish, and it was only really when i first started to make educated, thoughtful changes to my diet that I began to eat it. Now, i am completely obsessed. Salmon is my favourite fish and luckily for me, is incredibly good for you. High in protein and even higher in essential omega 3 fats, salmon is an amazing source of essential vitamins, minerals and macronutrients. It really is an all rounder when it comes to food. As you’ll probably remember being told time and time again by your mother, it is ‘good brain food’, and that’s thanks to the omega 3 fatty acids. They also contribute to excellent cell renewal, which is what makes them improve your skin. Our bodies need these fats to protect our internal organs and to ensure our cells are doing exactly what they should be, and functioning optimally. Combined here with a combination of other nutritious ingredients, the beautiful flavour of the salmon is really brought out. Smoked salmon, of course, has a lot more flavour, but it is its texture that makes this pate work so well. What starts out as a slimy string of fish becomes a smooth almost butter-like spread, perfect for sandwiches or added to salads.

INGREDIENTS
Makes enough to serve 4-6 people - Lasts for weeks in the fridge.

200g Smoked Salmon, roughly torn
1-2 Teaspoon Fresh Lemon Juice or Yuzu
2/3 Ripe Avocado
4 Tablespoons Tahini
2 Tablespoon Coconut Oil

Optional:

Nutritional Yeast

+ Can add crushed garlic, pepper, dill, capers, diced shallot, nutritional yeast.

METHOD
Start by blending the salmon and coconut oil in a blender, on a high speed. Blend for 1 minute, scrap down the sides, then add the tahini, lemon or yuzu and the avocado, scraping the flesh gradually so it is thinner and smoother. Blend for 2-3 minutes, scraping down the sides if you need to. Season to taste, add your extras and scrape into an airtight container or sterilised jar. Set in the fridge for about 20 minutes, or enjoy straight away. Spread onto crispy miracle bread with sliced avocado is my favourite. It is also wonderful spread inside chicory leaves. Top with herbs, nuts, seeds or even chopped fruit. Soft goji berries add a delicious flavour.

SWEET POTATO, KALE AND CARAMELISED GARLIC TART

Snacks, Vegetarian, Lunch, Gluten free, Brunchdanielle coppermanComment

I made this pie around thanksgiving, inspired to use yams. You could definitely chuck some shredded turkey in there to make it a proper thanksgiving pie, and making it a perfect solution for leftovers. The base is one i have experimented with before in sweet tartlet recipes. To make it savoury i just added extra salt and two of my favourite flavoursome ingredients: sumac and nutritional yeast. Nutritional yeast has been cropping up a lot lately which is good because it is a rich source of protein, and is vegan. People refer to it as ‘the vegan cheese’ because it has a nutty, cheesy kind of flavour. In my opinion it is a godsend, as i never thought i could live without cheese; but this satisfies my cravings. Just about. It is such a versatile ingredient to work with. You can eat it raw and simply crumbled onto salads, or work it into any baked good recipe. It particularly brought the flavour out in my Miracle Bread (which you should definitely try - very easy). Nutritional yeast boots the nutrient levels in any meal and is perfect for instantly adding flavour to something bland and uninspiring. 
Next, the herb thats having a moment in all of my savoury recipes right now, sumac. This was introduced to me by my sister recently and is also to thank for its tasty nutritional boost. It has been used for years for its medicinal properties including being anti-fungal, rich in antioxidants and also anti-inflammatory. It is full of vitamin C and omega 3 fatty acids, helping to prevent illnesses and cardiovascular disease. It has been proven to help remove free radicals from the body. Research also suggests that sumac is effective in helping with hyperglycaemia, diabetes and reducing obesity. It has a tart, slightly astringent kind of taste when eaten alone, but is also cheesy in its own unique way and brings something really amazing to any recipe it is incorporated into. Sumac is a berry which is dried and then ground, which is the form i use it in in my recipes. It sounds exotic but it is super easy to get hold of. 
This tart requires quite some concentration. It isn’t difficult, but its a bit like a roast dinner; you need to time things well and keep an eye on a lot of things at once. To prep, you can start by dicing the greens and chopping the cauliflower and broccoli florets into a rice consistency and then set them aside. Also you can thinly slice the beetroot before you start the body of the tart, just to be organised. Once that’s sorted you just need to keep an eye on the sweet potato whilst you make the perfect savoury tart base.
Take time over this one - it should be made for a lazy lunch or to accompany a warm dinner. Savour it, and enjoy it in company; you wont be able to stop talking about the flavours as they come through one by one. You wont get bored, lets put it that way.

INGREDIENTS
(
Makes one large pie of 18-20 small tartlets)

BASE

150g buckwheat flour
150g ground almonds
1/4 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
30g coconut oil, soft
2 eggs
1 teaspoon agave
salt
1 tablespoon nutritional yeast
1 tablespoon ground sumac
1 tablespoon nut milk or water

FILLING

4 eggs
2 Large Sweet Potatoes, cubed
2 handfuls of kale
10 brussels sprouts, chopped finely
2 tablespoons original coyo or dairy free yogurt
1 raw beetroot, sliced
Handful of spinach (or greens of choice)
3 Cauliflower florets, chopped finely into a rice
3 Broccoli florets, chopped finely into a rice
1 Tablespoon nutritional yeast
1 Tablespoon ground sumac
6 Garlic Cloves

METHOD

Preheat the oven to 170c. 
In a large saucepan boil the sweet potato cubes until soft. Whilst they cook, make the base. 
Mix all of the base ingredients in a mixing bowl with a wooden spoon until a dough begins to form. When it does, form into a ball and wrap tightly in cling film. Leave to chill in the fridge for 10 minutes. (You can get away with leaving this step out if your dough is dry enough and seems to be moulding successfully).
Press the mixture into the bottom of a tart dish. Press the mixture down firmly with the back of a spoon, and at the edges of the tart tin too. Make sure the pastry is compact otherwise it will crumble.
Bake in the oven for about 10 minutes, a little longer perhaps, if your pastry seems quite thick. Remove and set aside.
Whilst you wait for the sweet potato to get soft enough to mash, in a small saucepan heat a tablespoon of coconut oil. Add the garlic cloves, whole or halved, along with a splash of water, pinch of salt and drop of agave or raw honey if desired (this will caramelise them). Simmer for about 10 minutes, adding a little more water if it evaporates instantly. The cloves should brown a little and become soft.
When the sweet potato is soft enough put half in a bowl and leave half to drain in a sieve. Mash the sweet potato in the bowl until a puree forms. Press the sweet potato puree onto the bottom of the tart until the entire base is covered.
Next, slice your beetroot thinly, and layer several slices on top of the sweet potato puree, until the entire base is covered.
Now scatter a handful of diced, raw brussels (you can cook these if you like - either will work) on top of the beetroot layer. Do the same with your finely chopped kale and spinach, and any other leafy greens you may choose to use. Be sure to leave half your amount of greens for the top layer.
Now take the cubed sweet potato and the garlic cloves and fill the pie evenly. Scatter the remaining greens on top of the sweet potato, followed by the diced cauliflower and broccoli florets.
In a separate bowl, whisk the eggs thoroughly. I added Organic Coyo to make the tart creamier, but that is not essential. You could leave it out or substitute it for tinned coconut milk. Whisk continuously for about 2-3 minutes and then gently pour over the tart filling. You may need to rearrange the fillings to allow the egg to spread throughout the layers.
Bake for another 40-50 minutes. It may take longer depending on the amount of your fillings. To be sure it is cooked thoroughly, test the middle of the tart with your finger. If it feels jelly-like, it needs longer. Alternatively you can test it with a knife and if it comes out of the middle of the tart clean, thats a sure sign it is ready.

CHIA ROSEMARY CRACKERS

Snacks, Vegetarian, Gluten freedanielle coppermanComment

One of my most improvised, made-up-on-the-spot recipes, yet thankfully one of the most successful. Home in Bath my ingredients are limited so i made this recipe up completely from scratch, using whatever i could find and trying to figure out which nuts i could grind into a flour and which seeds i could use as a sort of gum alternative (to make the dough stick together). With a baking cupboard full of nuts and seeds and a spice rack to die for (nice work, mum) i ended up with some incredible crackers to accompany our lunch; full of flavour (i got carried away with the herbs) and extremely light and crispy. I never miss crisps that much but when i see them or think about the sheer delight that they used to bring me when i got home from a night out, i suddenly feel desperate to recreate them, healthily. These are in no way similar to thin, oily potato crisps but aren’t too far from being mistaken for a Dorito (minus their suspicious powdery coating). However, mix some nutritional yeast with some paprika and, voila: the ultimate natural, gluten-free tortilla chip! For a popadom alternative (yes i know, possibly the most versatile cracker on earth but seriously you can alter them to go with anything) just add ground cumin, garam masala and onion seeds and use to scoop up your curry.

INGREDIENTS

2 Tablespoons Chia Seeds 
1 Tablespoon Ground Almonds
1/2 Cup Quinoa Flour
2 Tablespoons Ground Sunflower Seeds
1 Tablespoon Coconut Oil, melted
1 Egg, whisked to a froth
1 Teaspoon Celery Salt
Pinch of Himalayan or Sea Salt (optional)
2 Teaspoons Dried Oregano
1 Teaspoon Dried Sage
2 Teaspoons Dried Rosemary or Ground Fresh Rosemary
4 Tablespoons Water
1 Teaspoon Baking Powder
Pumpkin Seeds (any seeds or chopped nuts really) To Top

METHOD

Preheat the oven to 175c.
Grind the chia seeds in a spice blender or if you dont have one of these just leave them whole. Place the chia seeds, ground almonds and ground sunflower seeds into a bowl and mix until combined. Add 2 tablespoons of water and mix again. The chia seeds will soak up the water immediately so you may need to add a little more than anticipated. Add the quinoa flour, salts, herbs and baking powder and mix again with a whisk or a wooden spoon if it becomes too thick. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons of water and mix again. Add the egg and mix thoroughly before stirring in the coconut oil. If the mixture looks too wet, add a little extra flour. If you want a smoother cracker, add this mixture to a blender and blend for 2 minutes until the dough becomes a smooth paste. Transfer back into a bowl and you’ll probably need to add a little more flour. I left mine unblended and the whole seeds gave it a brilliant texture.
Grease a baking tray with coconut or olive oil. People tend to use baking paper but i find, especially with things like dough, if it sticks to the paper there’s absolutely no separating them. Spread the mixture onto the greased baking tray (you may need two baking trays). Evenly spread the mixture and flatted with the back of a spoon or a spatula until it is between 2-4mm thick. The thinner you manage to get it, the more crispy they will be and perfect for dips. If you leave it thicker they’ll make perfect crispbreads or flatbreads for sandwich toppings (like an open sandwich) or even as a pizza base alternative. Anyway, spread the mixture so that it forms one large cracker that you can cut after the cooking process. Top with nuts or seeds of choice and another little sprinkling of salt and place in the preheated oven.
Bake for 10-20 minutes but check regularly. The sides will brown first so be careful not to burn any of it. If the middle doesn’t seem quite done, take it out anyway as it will continue to cook slightly and will crisp as it cools. For a pizza, the middle would be perfect still a little doughy, but for a crispy snack you can always double bake the middle portion of the mixture once it has cooled and you have separated the sides and set aside.

Perfect for brunch or lunch topped with mashed avocado, scrambled eggs, smoked salmon, bacon or ham, chicken and spinach leaves or houmous. Alternatively, spread with a little coconut oil and dip into soup or use to mop up your curry.