WELL BEING & OTHER STORIES

Recipes, rituals and other stories to realign the body and mind

VEGETARIAN

TURMERIC AND MUSTARD CREAMED CORN

Snacks, Sugar Free, Travel, Vegan, Vegetarian, Lunch, Recipe, Gluten free, Dinner, Brunch, Breakfastdanielle coppermanComment

Sweetcorn was something I would have eaten every day of my life when i was a child if i’d had any kind of power or control over my own decisions as a 6 year old. However, leaving my life in the much more capable hands of my mother (and father, but hmm not so much where food was involved - my mum still doesn’t know about our detours ‘thru’ Mcdonalds when it was his turn to pick me up from gymnastics on a saturday morning), I had a positively varied diet and am obviously grateful that i wasn’t forced to live off of tinned vegetables until i learned to cook. 

When i did learn to cook, and when i started my blog, sweet corn was absent. I swayed away from tinned foods and also those higher in sugars, and didn’t respect sweetcorn for its nutritional values as much as some other vegetables - like dark, leafy greens and sweet potatoes. However, this summer changed everything. I found myself in a dark bus station, transferring from one chicken bus to another, somewhere along the Guatemalan border, tired, hot, and hangry. When you’ve been on a bus designed to accommodate a quarter of the amount of people crammed onto it, gloria gaynor blasting throughout (who am i kidding, that bit was great), with only a mint from the driver to munch on (cute, but not quite sufficient), let me tell you the first thing you need after finding space to breath is a corn on the cob. i didnt know it at the time. But standing there waiting, as if she knew i was on that bus you know, on a torn apart pavement was a woman, with a smile, and a corn cart. (These things exist). Damn, that woman was serving all kinds of corn - sprinkled with lime or lemon or chilli salt or pepper, hot sauce or mayonnaise (ok maybe not). But it was everything. My friend and I abandoned our belongings - gigantic backpacks containing most of our lives - as if nothing else in that moment mattered other than getting us some of that corn. well. we got it. and damn did we love it. life was sweet, and in this moment, crouched atop our luggage eating juicy boiled corn with our hands, i knew these golden kernels of goodness were back in my life for good.

When i returned home i kept up my sweetcorn obsession, adding it to my lunch bowls, broths and other meals, as well as using it as a base for dips and soups. But since the winter is a coming, and my body is craving food not just for its energy but also its warmth, i needed to work it into a more comforting dish i could cuddle up with. this recipe is deeply warming and genuinely soothing. i love that food can do that to you. it hits every spot in the body that needs hitting. Now that we’re well into the season of making no plans to socialise whatsoever, spending time in the kitchen should become less of a chore and more a way to pass time between new series/christmas movies and online gift shopping, and to warm you up if the heatings not cutting the chill.

INGREDIENTS
Serves 2 as a main meal, 4 as a side.

400g Cooked Sweetcorn
1/2 Teaspoon Ground Turmeric
1/2 Cup Almond Milk + 1 Tablespoon to make Bean Paste
5 Tablespoons Solid Coconut Milk Fat / Cream
1/4 Teaspoon Himalayan Pink Salt
2 Tablespoons Tahini
8 Tablespoons Olive Oil or Coconut Oil (can also use ghee or butter if not vegan/dairy-free)
1 Tablespoon Dijon Mustard
1/3 Tin Cooked Cannellini Beans (any soft white beans)
1 Tablespoon Nutritional Yeast - optional
1 Teaspoon Reishi or Shilajit Mushroom powder - optional

METHOD

Start by making the bean paste/puree. Take your white beans and strain and rinse them in a sieve. Tip them into your blender or food processor and then add 6 tablespoons of your oil (save the other 2 for cooking), 1 tablespoon of your almond milk and 1 tablespoon of tahini. Blend on a medium - high speed for 2-3 minutes, until smooth. It should be runny, relatively thick, but not lumpy.

Next, cook your corn. If it is on the cob, boil the whole cobs for around 10-12  minutes and then use a sharp knife to cut away the kernels. If you are using frozen, boil for 8-10 minutes until it is juicy and soft. If you are using pre-cooked tinned corn, follow the instructions below.

In a separate saucepan to your corn, combine the remaining oil (or butter), the remaining almond milk, the coconut milk, salt, nutritional yeast and reishi or shilajit, if using, and mix with a wooden spoon. Stir over a medium - low heat and gradually add the cannellini bean mixture, stirring constantly. Once the sweetcorn is cooked, drain the water and add the corn to the milk mixture. Stir constantly and simmer for 3-4 minutes. Add the mustard, to taste, starting with a little amount and building up the flavour as you desire. Simmer for a further 10-12 minutes, to allow the mixture to thicken.

Serve hot with cooked quinoa, cubed avocado, shredded spinach and alfalfa sprouts, or other green vegetables - raw, boiled or sautéed. Add a source of protein such as chicken breast or salmon fillet. Also enjoy cold stirred through a salad, cold quinoa or other pseudo grains, or served as a side to any savoury meal. It is delicious added to mashed avocado on gluten free toast, served with eggs and smoked salmon for breakfast, stirred through soups or served as a cold side, I imagine, at a barbecue or picnic.

HOW TO MAKE PECANS, DATES AND RAW CHOCOLATE TASTE UNHEALTHILY TO-DIE-FOR

Snacks, Sugar Free, Summer, Vegan, Vegetarian, Gluten free, Dairy Freedanielle coppermanComment

One evening in July 2015, my flatmates and I found ourselves all at home at the same time, for the first time since we'd moved house. We moved in the first week of July, and because these days everyone has multiple jobs and no spare time at all, we hadn't even found time to sit and eat dinner together since moving in. However, this particular Saturday night we decided to have a wild one. We pulled together everything our fridge and cupboards had to offer, made a meal out of mismatches, dusted off my projector screen and had an old school movie marathon (featuring movies so terrible they're brilliant). We were thinking about movie snacks before we'd even decided on dinner, but what is a movie marathon without some sweet thangs? Popcorn gets stuck in your teeth and is nutritionally substandard. Chocolate - dairy/sugar/emulsifiers. Raw Chocolate - good but slightly boring. Sweets - just no, not these days. Chewy Bliss Balls / Cookie Dough Bites - chewy, sweet and salty goodness with raw chocolate. All natural, gluten, grain, dairy and sugar free, antioxidant, fibre and protein rich, and filling in a clean way. Well, that's just about the only way to christen a new home in my eyes, so thats exactly what we done.

This recipe is just the kind of recipe we all need more of. It is quick. It is seriously inexplicably delicious. And I practically made it with my eyes shut. I was concentrating on dinner, catching up with my flat mates and thinking about what films we should watch, whilst the food processor did the hard work. I also didn't measure any of the ingredients thoroughly, and chucked in whatever I could find. This recipe, although I have more or less estimated the quantities that I used, should work just fine. As long as you have the nuts and buckwheat flakes as the foundations, the dates and the coconut oil to bind and bring everything together, and the superfood powders to flavour, you'll end up with something delicious. The quantities only really alter the texture, not so much the flavour. So, if yours turn out too soft or wet, add more buckwheat flakes. If they turn out too sticky, and so stubborn they won't blend, add a little hot water. If they're too sweet, add extra lemon juice and/or salt/tamari. And if they're not sweet enough, add 1/2 or 1 date more.

In my defence of this seeming like a lazy recipe (why don't I just try it again and give you the exact measurements? Sadly, I. Don't. Have. The. Time), even if I did have exact measurements, the end result may not suit your personal tastes. This way, you can take inspiration from my recipe and work with it until you have it just the way you want it. I'm here to encourage you to create your own delicious foods, by providing you with the foundations and leaving the flavourings up to you. We're all different, and not everybody, for example, likes raw chocolate (shame on you tho). 

SALTED RAW CHOCOLATE CHIP & PECAN COOKIE DOUGH BITES

INGREDIENTS
100g Pecan Nuts
2 Tablespoons Desiccated Coconut
200g Buckwheat Flakes
3 Tablespoons Coconut Oil (room temp
1/2 Teaspoon Himalayan Pink Salt
Tamari
6 Medjool Dates
1/2 Teaspoon Lemon Juice or Zest
2 Tablespoons Chia Seeds
1 Tablespoon Hot Water - if needed to help things blend
½ Tablespoon Lucuma Powder
1 Teaspoon Maca Powder
1/2 Cup Raw Chocolate (I like Ombar), chopped

METHOD
Start by blending the nuts into a flour - usually takes around 1 full minute. Then add the buckwheat flakes and blend for another 30 seconds. Next, add the dates (halved), then the rest of the ingredients, apart from the raw chocolate. When fully combined and dough-like, transfer to a bowl and stir in the raw chocolate, kneading with you hands to combine (work quickly so the chocolate doesn't melt). Break the mixture into small chunks, roll into balls, flatten into bar shapes, or roll out gently and cut with shaped cutters to make raw cookies. Arrange on a baking tray or a plate and place in the freezer. Leave for 30 minutes, to 1 hour and remove 5 minutes before enjoying. I like mine straight from the freezer, and as they melt they become a fudgey consistency. If you prefer yours softer, leave them out for 10-15 minutes before enjoying. I'm sure you can work it out.

+ If yours seem too oily, wet, sticky, salty, sweet or lumpy, see above for directions.

VEGAN AND NUT-FREE AVOCADO MAYONNAISE

Snacks, Summer, Vegan, Vegetarian, Lunchdanielle copperman3 Comments
 

Mayonnaise is another one of those things that, when you embark upon a healthier journey through life, you think, 'God, I'm gonna miss you'. I certainly did. Before i knew anything about food and the importance of feeding our bodies sensibly, I had mayonnaise with everything. I whenever I had it, it covered my entire plate, not just a small fraction of it as it was designed to have done.

This recipe seriously puts mayonnaise to shame. Homemade mayonnaise isn't actually that unhealthy, as long as you use organic, free range eggs and good quality oils. However, it takes a bit of effort. Shop bought mayonnaise is mainly just chemicals, emulsifiers, additives and colourings in a bottle. So, seriously, do not eat it. This recipe is made with actual, real ingredients. The main ingredient is avocado, which is high in protein, fibre and healthy fats. The texture of the avocado combined with the oil is even creamier than normal mayonnaise, and makes the egg yolk you find in conventional mayonnaise recipes really unnecessary. This recipe is ridiculously simple and quick. All you need is to ensure the avocados are so ripe they are almost inedible, and a blender which will do the work for you. No hours of hand whisking involved!

INGREDIENTS

2 Ripe Avocados (preferably so soft that you wouldn't actually want to eat them on their own)
1/2 Cup Olive Oil
1 Teaspoon Fresh Lemon Juice
A Gentle Splash of Apple Cider Vinegar
Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt

+ OPTIONAL
Organic Wasabi Paste (Biona), Fresh Garlic, Black Pepper, Capers, Nutritional Yeast

METHOD

Slice the avocado in half, tap your sharp knife into the stone and pull it out. Score each half of the avocado vertically and horizontally and then gently scoop or squeeze out the flesh. Place the flesh into a blend or food processor along with the lemon juice, salt, apple cider vinegar and any other herbs or spices you choose to use. Blend on a medium speed. Gradually add the olive oil, a few drops at a time. Add more and more, until the mixture combines. It should be blending smoothly and should become thick. As you add more oil, increase the speed of your blender or food processor. Blend smoothly for 1-2 minutes, scraping down the sides if you need to.

Serve cold as a condiment for meat, fish, raw vegetables, salads, crackers, gluten free toast, eggs, quinoa or buckwheat burritos, or as a dip for raw vegetables and sweet potato chips/wedges.

 

CHESTNUT, QUINOA AND BRUSSELS NUT ROAST

Vegetariandanielle coppermanComment

I am no vegetarian, but this nut roast… it’s quite something. Something - perhaps not something to replace the turkey and ham that’ll sit atop my table this christmas - but something never the less. I have never made or even eaten nut roast, so this was quite a blind baking session for me. I didn’t really know what it was supposed to taste like, or even look like, and it certainly isn’t the most beautiful thing you will ever make, but it is delicious. At least, this version is, even if i do say so myself. 

Nut roast doesn’t look or sound particularly appealing, and although it is a traditional vegetarian option when it comes to roast/christmas dinner, it is very underrated in my opinion. It is just as delicious and flavoursome as stuffing is, and isn’t dissimilar in taste or texture, but the beauty of this nut roast is that it is crammed full of vitamins, nutrients and plant-based protein. Most nut roasts (and stuffings for that matter) are bulked out with breadcrumbs and flour, which can be strenuous on your digestive system, especially if you suffer from a wheat or gluten intolerance. These ingredients make the nut roast extremely bland and stodgy, so I wanted to rework this vegetarian crowd pleaser into something that would actually please a vegetarian, and a non-vegetarian for that matter. My recipe uses cooked quinoa and ground almonds instead to bind the vegetables, nuts and seeds, which are not only easier to digest but also exceptionally higher in protein, fibre and valuable nutrients. As the name suggests, nut roasts involve a lot of nuts. However, although nuts are incredibly nutritious and a great source of protein (particularly for vegetarians who can sometimes find it hard to get enough protein from their food), too many can also cause complications within the gut. For that reason, I have reduced the amount of nuts in this recipe, and increased the amount of vegetables.

+ You can experiment with your own combination of vegetables, nuts, seeds and herbs in this recipe, and the great thing is that the more you add the better it tastes. I’d recommend prioritising the sweet potato, chestnuts, ground almonds and as many herbs as possible, as these are the foundations that make it all come together, but other than that, add what you like!

Serve this as a vegetarian main, a vegetarian stuffing alternative or as a side to accompany meat dishes if you are feeding meat-eaters. It also makes the perfect starter as it isn’t dissimilar to seed & nut bread, so is brilliant with chutneys, soups, cheeses or as part of a canapé spread. I baked mine in mini loaf tins, serving one per person alongside the mains.

INGREDIENTS

1 Cup Quinoa
1/2 Large Sweet Potato, baked
20g Apricots or Dates, chopped
60g Brazil Nuts, chopped
30g Pine Nuts or Pistachios (any nuts will work), chopped
1 1/2 Cup Ground Almonds
3 Cloves Garlic, chopped
1 Tablespoon Tahini 
1 Red Onion
40g Chickpeas, optional
1 Tablespoons Lemon Juice
1/4 Teaspoon Himalayan Pink Salt
2 Tablespoons Tamari
1 Egg
250g Chestnuts, chopped
A Few Sprigs of Fresh Rosemary
A Few Sprigs of Fresh Thyme
1 Cup Brussels Sprouts, shredded
1/2 Cup Pumpkin Seeds
1/3 Cup Sunflower Seeds
3 Tablespoons Linseeds
1 Teaspoon Cinnamon or All Spice
1 Teaspoon Sumac
1 Teaspoon Ground Coriander
1 Teaspoon Cumin
1 Tablespoon Fresh Sage, chopped

Oil of choice, for frying/greasing

METHOD

Preheat the oven to 170c. 

Start by blending the sunflower seeds, half of the pumpkin seeds, the herbs and the chickpeas in a blender or food processor until they resemble a bread crumb consistency. Transfer them into a large bowl and set aside.

In a frying pan, sautee the onion, garlic, brussels and chestnuts in ghee, olive oil or coconut oil. Add the tamari and lemon juice and sear until the vegetables are completely soft. Place in a bowl then add the ground almonds chopped nuts eggs etc all flavours. mash and knead into a ball. press into a tin and bake. 

Meanwhile, measure all of the other ingredients, apart from the egg, into the bowl with the ground seeds and herbs. When the vegetables are soft, add them to the dry ingredients and mix with a wooden spoon, mashing the ingredients with the back of the spoon to combine them. In a separate bowl, beat the egg and then stir it into the mixture thoroughly.

When all of the ingredients are combined, press into a greased loaf tin, mini loaf tins or a muffin tray, to make individual single serving portions. Alternatively, to make canapés or to make vegetarian stuffing, form into 2 inch balls.

Bake for 45-65 minutes, depending on whether you are baking a large loaf, or smaller individual ones - which will take less time to cook.

RECOMMENDED CONDIMENTS

PARSNIP APRICOT GINGER CHUTNEY

1 Large Parsnip
1/2 Large Cooking Apple
1 Inch Chopped Ginger
1 Cup Water
Juice of Half an Orange
1 Teaspoon Fresh Lemon Juice
1/2 Cup Chopped Apricots
1/2 Teaspoon Ground Coriander
1 Tablespoon Apple Cider Vinegar
2 Teaspoons Agave or Coconut Palm Sugar
2 Tablespoons Chia Seeds
1 Tablespoon Baobab or Maca, optional

METHOD
Place all of the ingredients apart from the chia seeds into a large saucepan, and simmer on a medium heat. Once the chopping and dicing is out of the way, chutney is easy work. Leave it to simmer and soften, checking occasionally to make sure there is enough water in the pan. Keep topping it up with cold water if the fruit begins to stick to the bottom of the pan. After about 20-25 minutes, check the fruit to see if it is soft enough. Add a little more water, then remove from the heat, transfer to a blender and blend for 5 seconds. If you prefer your chutney chunkier, don’t blend it. Pour into a bowl, jar or airtight container and stir in the chia seeds. Let sit for a few minutes, stirring occasionally, and when the chia seeds have swelled slightly, seal the container and store in the fridge. 

Serve with the nut roast, or spread an even layer over the top and sprinkle with herbs or crushed chestnuts to garnish.

TRUFFLE TAHINI DRIZZLE

INGREDIENTS

1-2 Tablespoons Truffle Oil
6 Tablespoons Olive or Avocado Oil
1/2 Teaspoon Tamari
2 Tablespoons Tahini
1/2 Teaspoon Lemon Juice
1 Clove Garlic, crushed
Water, to thin (optional)

METHOD
Simply mix the ingredients together in a small bowl, or use a blender for a smoother result. Serve as a dip, or thin with a little water and serve as an optional dressing to drizzle over the nut roast.

+ This dressing is wonderful on salads too, and instantly transforms tasteless salad leaves and vegetables, making them creamy and delicious.

Serve with Celeriac Brazil Nut Slaw.

    BLACKBEAN HOUMOUS

    Sugar Free, Vegan, Vegetarian, Gluten freedanielle coppermanComment

    I could never get tired of grazing. I love to snack and if theres any kind of dip in sight, I'm straight in there. Houmous is such a versatile dip and and something I was first introduced to by my father. My earliest memories of it are associated with Friday nights when he would come home from work a little earlier than usual, put on his favourite 'chill-out music' and crack open a tube of Pringles and a tub of trusty houmous. As well as this TGIF mood, I also associate houmous with other happy occasions, such as picnics, summer and having guests over. It was also my obsession during exam periods at school (a not-so-happy occasion), and I only wish i'd made it from scratch and experimented more with flavours then, as I would have gotten a lot more from it. This recipe not only uses protein-rich chickpea's which are a great source of natural energy, but also contains black beans (which contain yet more protein and aid digestion) and sweet potato (high in antioxidants and known to contribute to weight loss due it is high, high fibre content). So it may seem like a mere dip, a side to your meal or an afterthought, but in fact you're using an entire meals worth of vegetables in one dip. Well, what do you know? This houmous has become a concentrated source of wonderful nutrients.  There's almost no need for the rest of the meal, so rest assured that it is entirely acceptable to eat it on its own, by the spoonful. 


    INGREDIENTS

    4-5 Tablespoons Olive Oil
    1 Tin Chickpeas, drained
    1 Tin Black Beans, drained (can also use cannellini beans)
    1/2 Sweet Potato, chopped and steamed (optional - if you omit, just increase the bean quantity by 1/2 a cup)
    Small Handful Fresh Basil Leaves
    1-2 Cloves Garlic, chopped
    2 Tablespoons Smooth Tahini
    Pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt
    1-2 Teaspoons Fresh Lemon Juice
    Handful of Fresh Basil or Rosemary

    Optional
    1 Tablespoons Nutritional Yeast

    METHOD

    Start by steaming the sweet potato. After about 8-10 minutes, when it is soft, add it to your blender. Now simply place all of the remaining ingredients into a high speed blender and blend for 2-3 minutes. Add more salt or lemon juice to taste and your choice of herbs (I like fresh basil, fresh rosemary and dried sumac). Scrape down the sides as the beans have a tendency to fly high, and blend for another minute or so, until the mixture is completely smooth and as creamy as is absolutely possible.

    BLACK BEAN SPAGHETTI WITH VEGETARIAN RAGU

    Vegan, Vegetarian, Gluten freedanielle copperman1 Comment

    Today I found myself walking past Planet Organic trying to think of something I needed, to give myself an excuse to go inside. I do this a lot, and every time I go to a health food shop for one thing, I exit with at least 4, and sometimes this doesn’t even include the thing I went in for in the first place. They are dangerous places, even more so when you’re hungry, or, like I was today, feeling creative and easily inspired.

    On my way to the till having picked up what I needed, I passed through the pasta isle. I used to eat pasta almost every day when I was at school. I would come home from school ravenous and make a bowl of pasta with cheesy baked beans. I know. Grim. But it tasted incredible. But since changing my diet, I haven’t had pasta once, and to be honest, my body doesn’t crave it. I admit my eyes do sometimes, as well as my nostrils. If i see a saucy pasta dish on a TV advert or walk past an Italian restaurant which smells as if it is actually built of basil and cheese, then I almost begin to miss it. However, in my opinion, it is always the sauce and the toppings that give a pasta dish any flavour at all. This is why I love making courgetti, because it is the same texture as regular spaghetti and doesn’t taste of much at all. The only difference is it isn’t doughy - other than that it tastes, in my opinion, just the same once it’s covered in sauce. The important thing is to keep the sauce relatively healthy too, monitoring your use of cream, cheese and processed meats. The recipe below is completely dairy free, vegan and vegetarian.

    Like most things in the shops, ‘healthy’ pasta is likely to contain a lot of ingredients you don’t recognise and these are ultimately things your body wont recognise either. All sorts of flours, stabilisers and emulsifiers may be present, amongst other ingredients. Most of these products are also high in starchy carbohydrate and sugar, and really aren’t that good for you at all. I tried Quinoa Spaghetti about a year ago now and loved it, but it still filled me up a little too much and although it was gluten and grain free, still felt quite stodgy to digest. So when I walked past Black Bean Spaghetti today, I had to investigate the packaging further. There were two ingredients: Organic Black Beans (92%) and Water (8%). This sounded instantly better than what surrounded it on the shelf as it was made for completely natural ingredients. No flour, not additives. Just beans and water. I was completely sceptical about putting it in my basket but felt so inspired that I had to give it a go. The store was out of turkey mince and I knew I had a fresh cauliflower at home, so I enjoyed mine with Cauliflower Ragu. Such a winner.

    INGREDIENTS
    A Packet of Black Bean or Edamame Spaghetti (ExploreAsian), or Homemade Courgetti
    6 Medium-Large Tomatoes
    15 Small Tomatoes
    Handful of Fresh Basil Leaves, chopped
    2 Handfuls of Spinach Leaves (or kale), chopped
    1 Large Garlic Clove, chopped or crushed
    1-2 Tablespoons Nutritional Yeast
    1/2 Teaspoon Salt
    A Few Sprigs of Fresh Rosemary
    1 Teaspoon Dried Mixed Herbs - Oregano, Sage and Thyme work well
    1/2 Large Cauliflower (you can also use quinoa instead which makes a delicious high protein vegetarian ragu with the same texture and consistency)

    METHOD
    Start by making the sauce as the courgetti will only take a few minutes and the black bean pasta only needs about 6 minutes to simmer. Chop the tomatoes into small chunks and pour a teaspoon or so of olive or coconut oil into a saucepan. Once melted, add the tomatoes to the pan followed by the basil leaves and the garlic. Stir in the spinach or kale along with the nutritional yeast, salt, dried herbs and other seasoning you may like to use. Cook over a medium to low heat for about 20 minutes. 
    Meanwhile, chop the cauliflower and make it into a rice consistency. Doing this will add texture to the sauce (as well as more vitamins and nutrients) and resembles the texture of mince meat very closely. Start by chopping the cauliflower edges into small pieces and place in a food processor or blender. Take the stalks and the tougher inside of the cauliflower and dice finely before adding to the blender. Blend for about 10-20 seconds. You only need to pulse it briefly as the pieces will break up instantly and you want to avoid making it into some kind of puree. 
    Once the sauce is reducing and becoming thicker, add the cauliflower rice or ‘mince’ to the sauce pan and stir until evenly coated. Simmer for another 15 minutes in order for the cauliflower to become a tiny bit softer and also to absorb the flavours of the sauce.
    Now make the ‘pasta’s’. Boil about 2 cups of water in a saucepan and then add the black bean spaghetti. I used about 1/5 or 1/4 of the packet for one serving. Simmer for 5-8 minutes, depending on how you prefer your pasta cooked. I like mine al dente so I drained mine after about 6 minutes. 
    Take your spiralizer or julienne peeler and start making the courgetti. You don’t really need both - i basically bought a courgette in case i really didn’t like the black bean pasta. But i did, so in the end i used both which obviously increased the variety of nutrients. I used just under half a courgette, peeled into spaghetti with my julienne peeler. You can also use a whole courgette if you don’t have/want black bean spaghetti, or you can leave the courgetti out if you just want to use the black bean spaghetti.
    Place the courgetti into a bowl and drain the black bean spaghetti. Add this to the courgetti and mix to combine with your hands. Give the sauce one last stir and season before pouring over the ‘pasta’s’. I recommend string the sauce through the pasta to coat it evenly. Top with a little nutritional yeast or organic cheese if you are not dairy intolerant, and add chopped pine nuts or seeds for extra flavour and texture and to further increase the nutrient content.

    TOMATO, RED PEPPER AND COCONUT SOUP

    Vegan, Vegetarian, Lunch, Brunchdanielle coppermanComment

    It’s soup season. We are so far into soup season it hardly seems like i will ever eat anything other than soup again. I've almost forgotten that food exists in its solid, fresh and raw form - this soul food has taken over my kitchen and nothing makes it onto my plate or bowl without passing the blender. 

    This soup is incredibly high in antioxidants and is alkalising and soothing to the digestive system. Deep red vegetables contain phytochemicals which are substances found only in plants that help fight disease. Tomatoes and red peppers are essential to health and are high in lycopene, a phytochemical that helps reduce the risk of several cancers. It is important to incorporate a multicoloured mixture of fruit and vegetables into your diet, as each different one contains different antioxidants, vitamins and minerals, which in turn provide their own different benefits. Getting a mixture of fruit and vegetables into your diet will mean your body receives a mixture of benefits. Some vitamins and minerals are even known to be more easily assimilated and absorbed by the body when consumed alongside others. 

    INGREDIENTS
    1 Tablespoon Coconut Oil
    Olive Oil, for roasting
    4 Large Tomatoes, chopped
    1 Red Pepper, chopped
    200g Cherry Tomatoes
    1 Tin Coconut Milk
    2 Large Cloves of Garlic
    1 Tablespoon Sumac
    As much Chilli as you can handle
    2-3 Tablespoons Nutritional Yeast
    30g Fresh Ginger, sliced
    Juice of 1 Lemon
    Tamari, to season
    Roasted Pumpkin Seeds, to top.

    METHOD
    Preheat the oven to 170c. Pierce the skin of the tomatoes several times and chop the pepper roughly then place on a baking tray and drizzle with olive oil, sesame oil or avocado oil and salt. Place two cloves of garlic on the baking tray too and roast for about 30-40 minutes, until the vegetables are soft. Meanwhile, halve the cherry/baby tomatoes and heat them in a saucepan to simmer them into a thick sauce. Add a little oil and water and simmer until the tomatoes are broken down and begin to resemble a paste.
    Remove the large tomatoes and the red pepper from the oven and place the vegetables in a bowl of cold water. Now do your best to peel the skins off - otherwise your soup will be bitty.
    Melt the coconut oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat. Pour in the chopped tomatoes and then add the roasted vegetables and garlic, the sumac, chilli, nutritional yeast, ginger and lemon juice and stir until combined. Add the coconut milk next; i used a little less than the entire tin and used the leftover in a smoothie, but add as much or as little as you want depending on how thick, rich or creamy you want it to be. Bring to the boil momentarily and then reduce the heat back to medium, or a little lower. Simmer for about 30 minutes. Let cool briefly once everything looks soft and like it has amalgamated. Transfer into a blender and blend until smooth. You can leave it unblended if you want a chunky soup, or just blend it for 1 minute if you want it somewhere in the middle.

    Season with salt and pepper or tamari, and drizzle with olive, sesame or avocado oil. Enjoy with rye bread (toasted twice) or my popular Miracle Bread and top with a spoonful of solid coconut milk and toasted nuts or pumpkin seeds.