WELL BEING & OTHER STORIES

Recipes, rituals and other stories to realign the body and mind

sustainability

Earth Day 2019: Earth-Friendly Tips From 13 Inspiring Insiders

Essentials, Inspiration, Lifestyle, Natural Living, Rituals, Sustainability, Vegandanielle coppermanComment

You know by now that I’m super conscious of the damage we are doing to our planet, and constantly striving to reduce my impact on the environment (unless it’s a positive one!). I love discovering new products and ways to swerve more commercial products or ways of doing things which - it’s becoming clearer and clearer - use up devastating amounts of energy and/or resources. Wherever possible, I opt for sustainably and ethically produced goods, ideally made with limited or no packaging, and made from either recycled, recyclable or biodegradable materials that won't stick around on our planet or disrupt our atmosphere for decades after we’ve disposed of them.

As with many things, there is so much to learn, and there are endless new products and methods to discover. That’s why, this Earth Day, I asked some of my friends of whom are on their own sustainability journeys, to share some of their favourite or recently-adopted eco-friendly life hacks. I am constantly finding new inspiration and discovering new things to try in order to do my bit, and I hope that by sharing several stories from people at different stages on their own sustainability journeys will inspire you to try at least one or maybe even all of them.

Happy Earth Day 🌎#ProtectOurSpecies

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Millie Mackintosh, model, entrepreneur & author

How do you make an effort to reduce your impact on the planet on a daily / weekly / monthly basis?

1. I use eco-friendly cleaning products (I’m currently loving Method)
2. I recycle
3. I use food storage boxes rather than cling-film in the fridge
4. I always carry a metal or glass water bottle to avoid buying bottled water in plastic or single-use glass
5. I’ve stopped using plastic cotton buds and straws
6. I have a keep cup for take-out coffee
7. I like to buy clothes from brands that used recycled fabric
8. I only eat meat once a week and am eating a lot more plant-based in general

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Cora Hilts, Founder of Reve en Vert

What’s one of the most important pieces of advice you would give to someone trying to make more conscious and sustainably lifestyle choices?

My two tips for living a more sustainable lifestyle are to educate yourself and to look outside of your own personal desires a bit more. Educate yourself with reliable news stories, get interested in science, watch things like Conspiracy and David Attenborough’s Our Planet. You will likely find yourself wanting to change rather than thinking of it as something taxing you have to do. And think of personal desire secondary to our collective needs - it’s just one Evian for my yoga class, it’s just one steak I am craving, it’s just one jump in the car. We are all contributing to this massive problem of pollution and emissions, so either think ahead or go without from time to time - it won’t hurt you, and it certainly won’t hurt the planet.

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Eva Ramirez, wellness & travel writer

What’s one recent change you’ve made in your routine to reduce waste?

I’ve become a lot more conscious of food waste recently, and I’m far more conscious about not letting things like a bruised plum or bunch of wilted parsley - which I would have otherwise thrown out - go unused. It’s made me a bit more creative in the kitchen, and my food processor and slow cooker have certainly got more action (I’ve been making pestos, soups and vegetable curries where wilted ingredients get completely disguised) and I feel a lot better about the food I’m eating too. I’m also using my freezer a lot more to avoid things going off and to waste - something my grandma is particularly proud of!

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Caroline Deisler, plant-based fitness blogger

1. Eating a plant-based diet has so many environmental benefits and it motivates me even more to promote that lifestyle. I feel more connected to our wonderful planet than ever before and love the feeling of eating a colorful diet that doesn’t involve any cruelty.

2. Other switches I made to reduce my environmental footprint is to get around by bike instead of Uber! I feel so much better as well, getting some fresh air instead of being stuck in traffic. :-) I‘m also really trying to cut down my plastic consumption 🙌🏼 I now have reusable shopping bags, reusable fruit & veggie bags for the fridge and got a water filter installed under the zink to stop buying plastic bottles.

+ I will also launch my swim line @caroswim_ this summer and put a big focus on sustainability. All materials are eco friendly, either partly or fully made from recycled materials and the packaging involves no plastic as well which I‘m really happy about. :-)

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Melissa Hemsley, chef and author

What’s your favourite go-to recipe to use up ingredients on their last legs, to avoid things going to waste?

An easy and delicious way to clean out the fridge, not waste food and make something great for a breakfast / packed lunch / snack is to do a "Friday Frittata" . Anything goes, you don't even need to chop anything, sometimes it's grated onion, carrot and cheese, sometimes I just tear up the ends of soft herbs like basil or dill and the last of the limp rocket. It's always different, always delicious and it's about 5 minutes of effort.

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Madeleine Shaw, author & blogger

Can you share your top 3 favourite eco-friendly tips?

1. Picking up the odd fruit & veg - As well as local markets, lots of big supermarket chains are now putting on display loose and often mis-shaped fruit and veg! These poor little guys normally become waste, so I like to pick these up and make a veggie hot pot with them, where it doesn’t matter how they look.

2. Turn on Aeroplane mode - I feel like my phone is always dying on me, and before it does, I need to urgently put in on charge. But, I've consciously tried to start putting it on aeroplane mode to save the battery and save electricity. A small change, but it means I get some time off of my phone and also helps lower my carbon footprint.

3. Who am I ordering from? - I have started to be more conscious about the companies I order stuff from, whether it's food, clothing or toys for Shay. I like to look at their values and also how they wrap and package the products that get sent to me. There are so many choices online for buying stuff, and it only takes 5 more minutes to find a more sustainable company for the things you need.

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Olivia Crighton, founder of Glasshouse Salon

Can you share some simple tips for anyone wanting to clean up their beauty and hygiene regimes? And any other habits you’ve adopted and would like to share?

  1. When it comes to my beauty cupboard, I’m a big fan of using Yoni’s plastic free and 100% organic cotton tampons. The material is designed to biodegrade after use and is free from the potentially harmful chemicals included in traditional feminine care products.

  2. I have also recently started using the OrganiCup. I learnt that the average woman uses up to 11,000 single use tampons in her life, so this is a great way to significantly reduce bathroom waste.

  3. I’ve also swapped my toothbrush for a bamboo Truthbrush and have been using beauty products that are packaged in glass, paper or aluminium as much as possible.

  4. I’ve followed a plant-based diet for many years now, but recently I have been making the extra effort to cook more at home and avoid processed and packaged foods to minimise packaging and lower my carbon footprint. I think it’s important generally to consider the environmental output of the foods you eat, choosing to opt for locally grown and organic produce where possible.

  5. It’s difficult to avoid buying all the sweet children’s outfits I come across for my daughter, but I really feel the fashion industry’s carbon footprint and nasty bi-products that contaminate our oceans cannot be ignored any longer. I try to minimise the number of new outfits I buy and opt for second hand options whenever I can. When I do buy a new piece however, I’ve found that buying higher quality items from more sustainable materials last longer, helping me to buy less overall.

  6. For any new mums, I’d also recommend looking into alternatives for basic baby items such as reusable, washable and biodegradable nappies, and biodegradable baby wipes. Traditional nappies can take up to 400 years to decompose and can contain harsh chemicals that could be bad for baby and for the environment too.

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Genevieve Gralton, founder of Underbares

Tell us what it’s like running an ethical, sustainable brand, and any personal daily habits you’d like to share on reducing waste and avoiding single-use items:

In my personal life, I intentionally avoid purchasing single-use plastics by always carrying a bag with me for groceries, a S'well bottle, and, if picking up food on the go, avoiding any extra packaging or plastic silverware! For my business, Underbares, all of our packaging is either created from recycled materials, biodegradable, or full recyclable. There's a lot of waste in the world--I don't want to add to it

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Zanna Van Dyke, fitness blogger

What’s one major change you’ve made recently in a conscious effort to love and care for the Earth, and how can we all do our bit to keep our immediate and local natural surroundings thriving?

The main change I have made is raising my awareness of our impact on the natural environment in day to day life. If I see trash in nature, I pick it up. It is as simple as that. Removing plastic, glass or cardboard from the natural environment helps reduce the risk of it impacting wildlife and causing further damage.

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Sjaniël Turrell, natural make up artist

I think the most effective change I’ve made over the last while was making the decision to start using only reusable wash cloths instead of wipes for changing nappies at home and only using wipes (biodegradable of course) on the run. I’m busy and exhausted most of the time so I would love to be one of those mums who only uses rewashable nappies, but as a freelancer without a nanny or cleaner I have to be realistic about what I could manage from day to day. Using washable cloths instead of wipes at home has changed my wipes usage from 3-4 packs per month to about 1 pack every 3 - 4 months - it’s one small change but I was amazed at how much of a difference it made!

Secondly, I have started using balm and oil cleansers to remove makeup with an organic cotton muslin that I can wash out after each use - I do this before washing my face with my favourite gentle cleanser from Twelve Beauty. This has saved me on using copious amounts of disposable cotton pads which I couldn’t live without before.

These aren’t massively life altering changes but I believe if we all make these small doable changes our collective choices have massive implications on positive impact for the earth. It’s about numbers of people making changes, not numbers of things for one person to change.

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Phoebe Torrance

What are some of your favourite eco-friendly swaps you have made over the years?

Firstly, stopping eating red meat - after a while I didn’t even miss it, I actually started to feel healthier and got my iron from sources like veggies, nuts and seeds. Secondly, bringing my reusable coffee cup everywhere I go - it even gets you money off in shops. Thirdly, using reusable makeup remover cloths which you can wash after use and re-use. And finally, always bringing my own tote everywhere, where, again you save money not having to pay for a plastic one! It’s about making little steps yourself that make a huge difference, and if we all did several small things, there would be a real change!

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Pauline Hansen, Founder of Pama London

You make gorgeous activewear from natural materials. What’s something you’re particularly proud of or excited about this year?

I’m super excited to be working with Econyl which is going to be one of our newest fabrics used in our leggings and bras. It’s made out of plastic waste from the oceans, meaning it not only recycles plastic waste, but also contributes to cleansing the oceans too! Our new Moon & Stars collection is all about cleaning up the oceans and preserving it. The products are also all recyclable, creating a circular economy for the journey of our clothes. I believe people should buy more clothes made with fabrics like Econyl, and that would be my top tip to anyone wanting to make positive changes to their habits. Buy less clothing and other things made from synthetic materials, and more

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Pip Roberts, Yoga Teacher

What ‘s your favourite life-changing adaptation been in your daily routine?

Ditching pre-made / shop-bought mylks. Environmental reasons go beyond the impact of cattle farming and back to the single use plastics we use for milk, so I am making an effort not to use tetra-packed mylks.

I blitz up vegan milk (my favourites are oat (so cheap!) and black sesame), in the vitamix each morning, storing any left over in the fridge in glass bottles for later.

Get going with this eco-friendly starter pack

Must See Sustainability Documentaries & Environmental Documentaries

Well Being & Other Items ~ The Good Store ~ Now Live

Essentials, Lifestyle, Natural Living, Sustainability, Style, Home + Interiorsdanielle coppermanComment
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Those of you subscribed to my newsletter will have already heard about the newest section of the website - the second hand store! I’m super excited for this as I get so many questions (and offers!) over instagram when I post about my charity or vintage store finds. And now, I want to make as many of the things I find available for you guys. I don’t need anymore stuff, but I always find so many amazing things that I know so many people would find a purpose for.

So many of my friends and some people over Instagram complain that they just never find anything good when trawling through charity shops or navigating the overwhelming and never-ending rails of a vintage store. I, on the other hand, adore it and grew up doing it, so, although I don’t always find things, I often do. You have to have a pretty imaginative approach, at times, as you have to find things that match your style or that you could work into your style. Sometimes, you might have to alter or customise things too, which, quite frankly, no one has time for (I guiltily have so many items that I’ve never gotten around to altering which is such a shame but is also just life). But I think the key is to have an open approach and not to go in there with too much expectation. If you have something in mind that you want to find, the chances are you wont find it. But if you treat the experience as more of an exploratory occasion, you never know what you mind end up discovering. More often than not, you don’t need what you find, but it’s nice to purchase something that is unique and not the same as everything else on the high street, which, by the way, you also don’t need.

The Good Store is something of a side project, in all honesty, and won’t be something that gets updated daily or even weekly. It will be updated depending on authentic sourcing (that is - whenever I or others discover new items) and whenever I or others find the time to photograph and upload the listings. If you have any particular requests for items you would like to find in the store or things you are particularly into or looking for, please leave a comment below.

This store place is an effort to slow down the rate of modern consumption and to provide high quality, pre-loved items that can find new owners / homes and purposes. In this way, by buying from The Good Store, you will be recycling and reusing, instead of buying new and adding to the economical and environmental strains, consequential of our highly demanding, consumerist society.

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+ If you have high-quality items that you no longer want or need, and you would like to sell them via The Good Store, email us via the form below with full details and we will endeavour to have them listed on the site. We will determine a selling price and you will receive a % of profits if they sell.

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Margate Beach Clean September 8th 2018 10am-12.30pm

Events, Sustainabilitydanielle copperman5 Comments
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I recently took part in my first beach clean in Hastings, and felt so inspired to organise one of my own. I really think there should be more opportunities to get involved, especially during the summer as it's actually just a really nice day out. I went with a friend and we basically just got an all-over tan, spent some quality time together not on our phones (apart from taking this photo) and did our part to help keep the planet clean and oceans healthy.

I'm going to be hosting a beach clean on September 8th, in Margate (just over 1 1/2 hours from London by train, and 2 hours by car), from 10am-12.30pm. Margate is brimming with really fun things to do too; from art galleries, vintage and boutique stores to amazing cafes and restaurants and, of course, Dreamland. So join us and make a day out of it. Get out of the city for a few hours and enjoy a day by the beach, helping us to keep the beaches and oceans clean.

We will be providing some all-natural snacks on the day, as well as some wonderful gifts from the likes of Qnola and Haeckels skincare (made in Margate!).

If you are coming, please let me know by simply leaving a comment on this blog post, including the number of friends you will be coming with.

We will meet near the Margate Clocktower - keep update on my instagram for exact details.

Hope you can join us! 

Complete Transparency on My Sustainability Efforts

Essentials, Lifestyle, Natural Living, Ritualsdanielle coppermanComment
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I've been asked a lot more and thus talking a lot more about sustainability recently, and so I want to cover the topic in more depth and share the fundamentals  of my own sustainability efforts.

Living in the World that we do, and in the state that it is, it is nearly impossible to live sustainably 100% of the time. This is something I have trouble coming to terms with, as, despite my best efforts, there are always things on which I could improve or wish I could avoid. However, the reality is, unless we retreat to the countryside or relocate to the jungle and live as completely self-sufficient beings, in self-built homes, wearing self-made clothes and eating self-grown produce, we're never going to be as sustainable or eco-friendly as we'd like to be. Things have simply gone too far.

In centuries gone by, we were doing pretty good, but with the introduction of all kinds of technology, we discovered ways to make things much easier for ourselves, and apparently either didn't fully understand or didn't care enough about the consequences these things would have on our environment, experiences and ultimately our evolution. We live in an age where we can have what we want, whenever we want it. This of course has its benefits and is a wonderful way to live, but it doesn't come without its side effects. We have become complacent, much lazier and are producing far more things and far more waste than ever before. We are consuming more than we need to, and the processes involved in the mass-production required to meet our constant needs and demands are often highly toxic, unethical and unsustainable; affecting the environment and the state of our land, our air, our oceans and our ecosystem, along with the welfare of people involved in production and the welfare of us, as consumers of lower quality products (especially when it comes to food).

I dream of a time when - although tougher and of course less luxurious - people had limits. A time when people would grow their own foods or buy from local suppliers and accept that when something wasn't available, they could go without. A time when clothes were made better and, although more expensive, would be more of a luxury or in some ways, more meaningful. If you didn't like something enough, you wouldn't buy it, or if you couldn't find something you liked, you could take the time to make something yourself. This time I dream of seemed much simpler. Alright, we didn't have half the things we depend on and enjoy most in the modern day, but we got by just fine without them, and our environment suffered considerably less. There were less products, less advertising for things we don't really need, and less options. We made do with what we had, and that was enough. Chances are, we were happier too. Some of the poorest countries and cultures I have experienced are some of the happiest, and I am passionate about finding ways to simplify our modern lives so we can live with less, do less and enjoy ourselves, our time and our planet more.

Whilst I am no saint when it comes to sustainability, I try to live as naturally and consciously as possible. In making several sacrifices and taking time to discover ways to swap modern essentials for more natural necessities, I am doing my bits, however small they may be.

Modern-day materials and more eco-friendly alternatives

To me, beyond just generally consuming and buying less, the materials involved in the things I do buy are of major importance to me. In general, a non-biodegradable material is anything that air, sunlight, water, and ground soil cannot break down. There are many manufactured / synthetic materials which are non-biodegradable, but are favoured for being cheaper and easier and quicker to produce. Of those, plastic and cotton most commonly come under widespread scrutiny. Here's a few flash notes on why, and some more eco-friendly and sustainable suggestions.

Plastic uses gallons of water to produce. It takes more water to produce a plastic bottle than the amount of water that it in it.

Plastic, if not recycled and reused, takes years to decompose and biodegrade. Once you throw away something made of plastic, it will sit in landfill or end up in the Oceans, killing the sea life by polluting their habitats, getting ingested or physically harming them in other ways. There is a figure floating around (excuse the pun) that by the year 2050, there will be more plastic than fish in the sea. I'm not sure how they can determine this or how likely it is, but I'd say its enough to make you think twice about using so much plastic, and about how you dispose of it.

The process of making plastic (which is made of polypropylene - a material composed of petroleum and gas) requires lots of energy, involves non-renewable fossil fuels and contributes to the level of greenhouse gases in the environment. 

Cotton is another concern. It requires a lot of water to produce, and is commonly heavily treated with pesticides, unless organic. 

Paper. We all know what's happening to the rainforests. Although it biodegrades, and is easier to recycle, paper still requires a lot of water and wood to produce, and our rainforests can't grow fast enough to keep up with the demand.

There are plenty of other materials - such as styrofoam, polyester, cans and tins, rubber, nylon, cellophane to name a few - that we should also be conscious about using, and serious about cutting down on.

So, what's good?

Other plants, such as bamboo, are generally more sustainable, renewable and more efficient options. Bamboo doesn't require any pesticides, and it is self-replenishing. 1/3 of the amount of water is needed to grow bamboo than is required to grow cotton. 1 acre of bamboo yields 10 times more than 1 acre of cotton. Bamboo is also much more absorbent than cotton and is stronger, meaning its more efficient in serving the purposes we tend to use cotton for.

Bamboo can be used in a solid form to replace plastic, and its fibres can also be used in fabrics and materials for things like clothes, furniture, packaging and more.

Organic cotton is also better than standard cotton, as there is no use of pesticides or other chemicals in the production process. It is cleaner, and better for the environment, but it still uses a lot of water, energy and labour to produce. If un-dyed, cotton biodegrades, which is why its best to buy organic as it is safer and cleaner to biodegrade.

Plant fibres such as hemp, flax, coconut (coir), sisal, jute, silk/wild/peace silk, pineapple (Piñatex), beech tree (modal) and many more make really great alternatives to cotton and can be used to make things like clothes, shoes, furniture and other materials. I also love tencel which is made from wood pulp fibres.

Linen is one of the most biodegradable fabrics used in fashion items. Try to buy it un-dyed as it is fully biodegradable that way.

Using recycled materials is also good, but it does require a lot of energy, especially up-cycling things like plastic. With clothing, buying second-hand and customising or altering something is a great way to give new life to unwanted clothes.

Obviously, to be 100% sustainable, you would have to stop buying things all together. Even these natural fibres will contribute in some way to pollution through processing and will eventually end up as waste, but the good thing is they will biodegrade much more efficiently. Things made with natural fibres tend to cost more too; you are ultimately paying that little bit extra for more careful and ethical practices, for better quality clothes and to support smaller businesses and their authentic morals.

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My Sustainability Efforts and Practices

Like I said, it would be impossible to live completely sustainably and self-sufficiently in this day and age, and I am absolutely not trying to act like I do or come across as perfect and flawless at it. I want to be completely transparent here. I still use a lot of products and have several habits (not to mention jobs) which are not environmentally friendly, but the main thing is I am cutting down on them and making major swaps wherever and whenever I can. Here's the area's I'm making most headway with, as well as those in which I am not quite there yet. 

Beauty

I do use make up and skincare products that aren't entirely natural, vegan, organic or ethical, but i prefer to use things that are at least one of those things. My skincare and beauty routines are not 100% clean or perfect, mainly because as a model I don't have complete control over what products are used on me from one day to the next. Also, at home, there are products I've been using for years which I just love. However, I am more conscious when using them, and choose to use natural, eco-friendly, organic and ethical products much more than these artificial/non-eco products. Products made without artificial chemicals, parabens, micro beads and other fillers are not only better for the environment but also for your skin.

I would also suggest using wooden earbuds instead of plastic earbuds, as well as wooden or metal razors, instead of single use/disposable razors.

+ Go a step further and find products that are packaged in recyclable, refillable or biodegradable packaging.

Style + Clothing

Whilst I prefer to buy second hand/vintage or small-batch/handmade/natural fibre fashion items, I'm not going to pretend I never shop at places like Topshop, Zara, H&M, Forever 21, etc etc. I really do. Not often, but occasionally. And I'm always wearing and promoting brands that aren't always ethical or sustainable in my line of work as a model. But that doesn't mean I approve, it's just part of the job.

Most of the time I try just to not buy new clothes, because I don't really need them. However, from time to time something will catch my eye or I will need something for specific traveling conditions, and if I can't always find (or afford) clothes made from natural fibres, or second hand clothes, I will end up on the high street; although I don't buy something unless I really, really love it.

I have recently felt particularly unfulfilled with pieces I've bought from high street brands, as many of them either need altering or have something about them that I'dd like to change. They rarely feel perfect. And they always seem over-priced and quite often poorly made. Not to mention, everyone ends up buying and wearing the same things. Its far more special to buy a unique second-hand piece or items made to order or in limited batches from more artisan producers. Clothes like these also feel so much better. There is more life and character in them, not to mention you are either giving back to charity, or saving things from going to waste. It's literally all good. 

Food + Diet

I try to eat plant based as much as possible, mostly due to the environmental side effects associated with the production of meat. However, I am not 100% vegan all of the time; I have a flexible approach to eating and try not to put too much pressure on myself if I can help it.

I try to avoid meat and fish, eating it probably once a week, max. This is mainly due to the amount of water, feed and land that is required to raise livestock and produce meat and animal products, which is not very environmentally friendly, and also the state of commercial fishing, which produces a lot of waste which ends up in the ocean.

I try to shop locally and in bulk to avoid unnecessary packaging, but this isn't always possible and I do end up in my local Tesco from time to time. I avoid packaged items as much as possible but sometimes have to grin and bear it and hope it will all end up recycled. Makes me feel better anyway.

Travel

I travel a lot with my job, and that is certainly not an eco-friendly habit. Flying is pretty bad but unfortunately can't be avoided. I love travelling too much. I try to balance it out by taking buses instead of cars and trains, and, whenever possible, I always schedule in extra journey time so I can get to places by foot or by bike. 

See my latest video on IGTV to explore my favourite simple sustainable swaps for useful tools and everyday products.

 

February Essentials _ 2018

Essentials, Monthly Essentials, Natural Livingdanielle coppermanComment

I recently connected with the team over at Ecoage - a brand consultancy founded by Livia Firth that helps businesses to grow sustainably, by creating, implementing and communicating sustainability solutions. They run such inspiring initiatives and projects, including the #30Wears, #TheGreenCarpetChallenge and The Commonwealth Fashion Exchange, based on collaboratively curated garments which take into consideration the supply chain, natural recycled or renewable materials and ethical work and labour practices. Last month they opened The Commonwealth Fashion Exchange exhibition  in partnership with Swarovski, The Woolmark Company and MATCHESFASHION.COM, at Australia House; open until the end of April.

This new power machine is never being put away. It's out in the morning awaiting its smoothie duty, and it's gotten me through the colder days with its soup setting.

I first discovered Stress Dots whilst studying Holistic Massage last year. They are such a relevant and unique tool for managing stress, helping you to be more aware of you moods and most importantly your stress and anxiety levels. With the colour-coded key, you can monitor your levels of fear and nervousness; almost like a notification as a reminder to take a breather.

I, Tonya is as good as you think it's going to be. Maaaaargot!

The Hunter Technique is by far one of my new favourite workouts, and in fact, it’s nothing new at all. With Jermaine Hunter, you get back to basics and embrace your inner animal, returning to the innate primal ways that have been suppressed as society and the human race has evolved. Think crawling, climbing, swinging and walking like monkeys, ducks, lizards and more. Working out this way is more like playing; a combination of discovering how many ways your body is designed to move, and seeing how much true strength you really have. It instills a sense of exploration and excitement and requires a focus and concentration like no other workout. You will leave sweaty and feeling challenged, but you don’t leave stressed or short of breath, or feeling agonisingly depleted. Also known as Calisthenics, the movements involved are simultaneously calming and strengthening, demanding for both the body and mind and creating a strong body-mind connection. And when you begin to rediscover what the body is designed to do and just how out of touch you've become with it, you'll be more inspired than ever to get stronger and fitter.

I discovered this artisan homeware brand in a gift store in Clifton, Bristol and I think everyone should know about it. 

During London Fashion Week, I met the founders of www.wearthewalk.co.uk; an organisation which showcases up and coming, new, young designers, and through a monthly subscription program, offers a service whereby you can rent these special pieces - most of which are made by hand and in small batches - whenever you want.

Just in time for #InternationalWomansDay, this @ChintiandParker x @WomenForWomen International collaboration is a reminder that there is so much good in the world. All proceeds from sales go to Women For Women International to help women survivors of war to rebuild their lives.

Last week I met some representative of Nude By Nature; Beauty Thats Good For You;
made with powerful native Australian ingredients, omitting synthetic components and preservatives. I'm loving their bronzer, primer, loose powder eye shadows and moisturising under-eye concealer.

Espa's fitness body oil is unlike anything you have ever put on your body before. And they've just launched a shower oil version. Apply as an oil and enjoy as it mixes with the shower water into an overpowering, aromatic lather.

Errrmm; yes to everything. Why do birthdays only happen once a year?

This Paloma Wool must-have is back in stock.

I tried out such an amazing yoga class at @heartcore with @timcyoga, called XYB yoga. Its a fusion of yoga and pilates and whilst it's more challenging that standard yoga classes and flows more like a fitness class, it is super calming and relaxing in it's own way.

Essential oil of the moment: Vetiver

James Vincent McMorrow (I Lie Awake Every Night + Higher Love)

Austin & Austin - aesthetically, organically and ethically with it. All of their products are certified organic and tested only on people. All of their packaging is made from 100% recycled materials and is fully recyclable.

Gigi x Vogue Eyewear's new collection; in particular, these.

Received a Chakra Bracelet at an event I attended recently. 

Finally, a protein powder that doesn't taste artificial or have a sickening sweetness. Personally, I can't bear most protein powders as I find them too sickly, but when I'm working out a lot, Innermost's vegan Health blend in Creamy Vanilla is a post-workout smoothie/shake game changer. (They also do whey-based products too).

The latest addition to the Qnola Family - Quinoa Oat Crunch - has arrived. Same organic British-grown quinoa, same all-natural, functional ingredients, now with added crunch thanks to a dose of fibre-rich gluten free oats. You are welcome.

This Curpo/Viscose slip strap top by Cossac is not only overly wearable, day and night, it's also made ethically by hand, and sustainably, using renewable fabrics.

These dream jeans from H&M. I found them hiding round a corner on the top floor of the store on regents street as I was leaving the store. Am gonna get my #30wears out of them that's for sure.

(These posts consist of a naturally curated collection of things I truly adore, and are not sponsored unless openly stated)