WELL BEING & OTHER STORIES

Recipes, rituals and other stories to realign the body and mind

vegetarian

Springshine Vegan Lemon Curd Crumble

Dairy Free, Gluten free, Recipe, Seasonal, Spring, Summer, Sugar Free, Sweets + Desserts, Vegan, Vegetariandanielle coppermanComment
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I’ve always been a fan of crumble, and from a young age was obsessed with lemon curd, so I recently thought, why not combine the two and see what happens? The love child of this experiment developed into a beautiful lemon curd crumble; creamy and tart on the bottom, crisp and crunchy on the top. It is the ultimate flavour sensation, with its flavoursome fruit layer coupled with the creamy, coconutty crumble topping.

This recipe is bright in colour and vibrant with flavour, and reminds me of the first sign of sun in the spring, and the warmth and light of the summer. It is light, with sour and acidic notes, whilst also being incredibly refreshing. Using fresh lemons, it contains an abundance of vital vitamins and minerals. Lemon season starts roughly around late winter / early summer, and runs right through to the warmer months, and eating seasonally, you can rest assured you are getting in all the goodness that nature intended for you to have access to at this time of year.

I love serving this warm as a dessert, with either plant-based ice cream (I like soy, coconut or cashew) or homemade vegan cashew cream sauce or custard. You could also use single or double cream or plant-based cream or creme fraiche (I love anything by Oatly). I also love it chilled from the fridge, served with fresh or stewed berries, either as a breakfast, a snack or a chilled dessert.

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Components

For the vegan lemon curd

60g coconut oil, melted
juice and flesh of 4 lemons
zest of 1-2 lemons
100g honey, coconut sugar or other natural sweetener of choice
3-4 tablespoons arrowroot powder*
6 tablespoons soy yoghurt or solid coconut milk from a tin (can replace with other yoghurt of choice such as coconut, oat or almond yoghurt. Those who eat dairy can also use probiotic dairy yoghurt or double cream)

* If you are not vegan, you can use 3 eggs and 2 egg yolks instead of the arrowroot, using the same method as below).

For the topping
100g ground almonds
100g desiccated coconut
2-4 tbs honey
1 tbs coconut sugar
50g coconut oil
20g grated lemon zest

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Method

Preheat the oven to 160c. Lightly grease a heatproof oven dish with coconut oil or line with greaseproof paper.

Start by mixing the topping ingredients in a medium bowl using a wooden spoon, then crumble into breadcrumb-like clumps with your fingers. Place in the freezer to stiffen whilst you prepare the lemon curd layer.

To make the vegan lemon curd layer, measure the lemon juice, lemon zest, lemon flesh (removing the remaining flesh from the lemon skin using a metal spoon and / or your fingers), coconut oil and honey or other sweetener of choice into a medium saucepan over a medium to high heat. Immediately whisk in the arrowroot, adding 2 tablespoons first, then whisking until fully combined, before adding the remaining 1 to 2 tablespoons gradually. If the mixture seems thick enough after 2-3 tablespoons of arrowroot, you don’t need to add the 4th tablespoon. Whisk again to combine thoroughly.

Continue to heat over a medium to high heat, until the mixture begins to thicken and bubble. It should become smooth, quite gloopy and glossy. During one of my test runs, a lot of the oil separated and sat on the surface, but if this happens, simply remove from the heat and whisk vigorously until the mixture comes together smoothly again.

Once the mixture has become thick and smooth, remove from the heat and whisk the mixture a final time to ensure it remains creamy and doesn’t separate.

Now whisk in the soy yoghurt or solid coconut milk (or whichever alternative you might be using), one tablespoon at a time, until smooth.

Pour the mixture into your prepared dish and then cover with the crumble mixture. Place in the oven for 15-20 minutes, until the crumble begins to brown and crisp.

Well Being Book Recipe ~ Beetroot, Carrot + Coconut Soup

Brunch, Dinner, Lunch, Recipe, Well Being Book, Vegan, Vegetariandanielle coppermanComment
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This hearty soup uses ingredients associated with the root chakra (page 326), which works to keep us grounded with the Earth’s energy and, when balanced, can increase confidence, energy and openness. Signs of a blocked or misaligned root chakra include short temper, lack of motivation, anxiety and general frustration. Eating foods associated with this chakra can help to release these emotions. Serve with Magic Vegetable 'Bread' Rolls (page 314), toasted Miracle Bread (page 314), or Crackers (page 178).

Components

Serves 4 as a main, or 6 as a starter

2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil or coconut oil 1⁄2 red onion, diced
2 garlic cloves, crushed
5g fresh ginger, finely chopped
1 tsp ground coriander
3 large beetroots, peeled and chopped 2 carrots, peeled and chopped
600ml vegetable or bone broth (preferably homemade, page 315)
2 × 400ml cans (800ml) coconut milk
1 tsp dried thyme or lemon thyme
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Elevate it:
Juice of 1⁄2 lime

Method

In a large saucepan or stockpot, heat the oil over a medium heat. Once hot, add the onion, garlic, ginger and coriander and sauté for 5 minutes.

Add the beetroots, carrots and broth. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 20 minutes or until the beetroot is soft.

Allow to cool slightly, transfer to a blender (work in two batches if necessary) and add the coconut milk. Blend on a medium speed for 30 seconds and then increase to the highest speed for 10 seconds. Add more broth or water to thin the soup if it is too thick.

Return to the saucepan, add the thyme, season to taste with salt and pepper and add the lime juice, if using. Heat through, then divide among bowls and serve immediately.

Top with Nut Parmesan Sprinkle (page 313), a knob of Avocado 'Butter' (page 308), herb-infused oil (page 313) or a swirl of extra coconut milk.

Blend any leftovers with a can or two of chickpeas, to make a vibrant root- vegetable dip.

Mango Tofu Curry; Two Ways

Dairy Free, Dinner, Gluten free, Recipe, Vegan, Winter, Autumndanielle coppermanComment
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Ah, I’m excited to share this one with you and I really, really hope you make it. This was an impulsive experiment last week, to keep me occupied whilst cooped up indoors with my first proper cold in years. A few days prior, my sister had mentioned a really good mango tofu curry she’d been making on repeat recently, and I immediately wanted in.

Not only are the days getting shorter, the evenings darker and the weather, well, worse, we’re also all more prone to illness this time of year. There are more viruses in the air and our immunity weakens as the weather gets colder. We need more from our food and we need different things from our food. Warming and soul-soothing stews, one-pots, dahl’s and curry’s replace light and refreshing summer salads, snacks and light meals. We turn to more heartier meals using more grounding and deeply nourishing ingredients.

This curry in particular is abundant in all kinds of spices, which have been used for decades in many traditions for healing from within. Needless to say, it really sorted me out and lifted many of my symptoms in under 24 hours.

I’m aware that mango isn’t the most seasonal ingredients right now here in London, but it adds such an incredible flavour and texture to this dish. You could omit it or replace it with something like banana (trust me), apricots (fresh or dry), or other fruits or vegetables if you want something a little more inline with October.

I made two variations of this; one Indian-style korma and one Thai-style green curry. My favourite is definitely the korma (pictured), but the Thai-style green curry is delicious in an entirely different way. It’s a little lighter and more refreshing.

This recipe is a total crowd pleaser, and quick and easy to make, is ideal for busy weeknights or batch-cooking and filling the freezer on weekends. You could double the recipe anytime you make it and keep some in the fridge for the rest of the week, and some in the freezer for instant ready meals.

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Components

Serve 2-4

½-1 white onion*
2 cloves garlic *
2 teaspoons ground garam masala
1/2 teaspoon ground paprika powder
Salt
Black Pepper
2 tablespoons oil (I used coconut but you could also use ghee, sunflower or other vegetable oil
1 teaspoon ground cumin
2 teaspoons ground turmeric (or 1 teaspoon fresh & grated)
1-2 teaspoons fresh ginger, grated (depends on personal taste)
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground cardamom (if you can only find pods, crush them in a pestle & mortar)
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 tablespoon tomato paste (or 2 large fresh tomatoes)
1 fresh chilli or 1/4 tsp chilli powder or flakes
1 mango, chopped into cubes (about 200g chopped weight)
1 block tofu, chopped (about 200g)
1 courgette, sliced into half moons
1 tin coconut milk
Juice of 1/2 a lime
4 tablespoons ground almonds
Handful of flaked almonds, to top

* I can’t eat garlic or onion due to an intolerance, so I tested this recipe without them as well, and, for anyone else in a similar position, it works perfectly well if you’d prefer not to use them.

Method

Start by heating the oil in a frying pan and, once hot, add the onion, garlic, tofu and courgette. Stir fry for a few minutes, flipping continuously, and then add the mango, tomato paste (or tomatoes), fresh chilli and spices. (You could also blend the onion, garlic, tomato paste, fresh chilli if using and spices in a small spice blender before cooking, or dice / mince the onion at least, as it a nicer texture in the sauce than having them as large chunks). Either way, fry for about 10 minutes, until fragrant and until the tofu is beginning to brown and crisp on the outside.

Next, add the lime juice and then the coconut milk. Stir to combine and then add the ground almonds.

+ Now would be a good time to put some brown rice or other grains on to cook, to serve with your curry.

Bring to the boil then reduce to a simmer and cook for about 10-20 minutes, until the sauce reduces and thickens. Add a splash or water if the mixture becomes too thick for your liking. I personally like the sauce thick, but added a little water to loosen it a little before serving.

Lastly, transfer to bowls and serve over your chosen grain.

Top with a pinch of fresh coriander and a handful of sliced almond.

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Thai-Style Green Curry

Components

2 tablespoons sunflower oil (or coconut oil or other plant based oil)
1/2 - 1 onion

2-3 cloves garlic
150g firm tofu
, sliced
1 courgette or 1 aubergine, chopped

1 mango (about 200-300g)
1 stick lemongrass, bashed
1 tablespoon ginger, grated or diced
1-2 red or green chillies (depending on personal taste)
1-2 teaspoons dried coriander
1 teaspoon cumin
1/2 - 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
Juice of 1/2 a lime

1 tablespoon tamari

1 tablespoon rice vinegar
1 can coconut milk
20g nori or other seaweed
1/4 - 1/2 cup water
1/2 - 1 teaspoon chilli powder or flakes (to taste)
Handful fresh coriander
Salt and black pepper

Optional
50g bamboo shoots
A few kaffir leaves
1/2 teaspoon galangal
Small handful of Thai basil leaves

Bok choy, broccoli or mange tout snap peas
1-2 fillets of cod or other white fish (depending on number of servings)
250g king prawns, raw + sliced

Method

Start by heating the oil in a wok or frying pan. Fry the onions and garlic for 2-3 minutes until fragrant and beginning to brown and then add the tofu and courgette or aubergine. Fry for 5 minutes, until the tofu begins to brown, and then add the mango and the chilli.

Next, stir in the spices and ginger, followed by the lime juice, tamari and rice vinegar. Stir to combine and then add the coconut milk and seaweed. Stir again and bring to the boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook for 10-15 minutes.

Season, to taste, and add extra chilli, chilli powder or flakes until you are happy with the flavour and spice. Add the fresh coriander and serve, either with brown rice or another grain or gluten free noodles.

Well Being Book Recipe ~ Double Sweet Corn Fritters with Eggs & Avocado

Breakfast, Brunch, Lunch, Recipe, Vegetarian, Well Being Bookdanielle coppermanComment
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This recipe is perfect for low-energy mornings because, whilst it looks and tastes impressive, it is simple to prepare. The sweetcorn fritters stand in for conventional breakfast carbs and bring more nutrition to the table. For a very simple option, pair them with avocado or for something more extravagant, serve them with poached eggs, a selection of homemade dips, seaweed salad or greens and pickles or Sauerkraut (pages 316–317). Bacon, Coconut 'Bacon' (page 313) or smoked fish also make a nice addition.

Serves 4 (makes 6–8 fritters)

Components

4–8 eggs
2 avocados
1 tbsp lemon juice (optional) pinch of salt (optional)

For the sweetcorn fritters

350g corn kernels, cooked and cooled 1 large egg (or 1 tbsp chia gel, page 81) 1 tsp ground or freshly grated turmeric pinch of sea salt
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil, plus extra for frying
60g buckwheat flour
1⁄2 tsp baking powder
small handful of fresh coriander leaves (or other fresh herbs) freshly ground black pepper

Elevate it:

1 tsp shilajit powder, 1 tsp spirulina powder, 2 tbsp golden linseeds or chia seeds

Method

First, make the fritters. Place 100g of the corn in a blender and add the egg or chia gel, turmeric, salt and oil. Add any elevate ingredients, if using, and blend on a high-speed for 30 seconds, until it forms a thick, creamy paste. Once smooth, transfer to a bowl, add the remaining corn kernels, flour, baking powder and coriander (or other fresh herbs) and stir to combine. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Heat a little oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat and, once warm, spoon 3–4 large ladlefuls of batter – spaced apart to avoid them merging into one – into the pan. Flatten slightly with the back of a spoon and cook for 1–2 minutes, until brown and crisp, then flip and cook the other side for 1–2 minutes, until crispy. Repeat until all the batter has been used up.

Meanwhile, scramble, fry or poach your eggs. Next, prepare the avocado: cut each in half, remove the stones, and either slice thinly, lengthways, and scoop out the flesh, or into a bowl and mash with the lemon juice and salt.

Add cooled fritters to packed lunches in the place of sandwich bread.

Vegan Aquafaba Mayonnaise

Anytime, Condimentsdanielle coppermanComment
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I just wanted to chime in with a V quick and easy yet mind blowing and magical recipe which I think you all kind of need. I have an almond & cashew and an avocado mayonnaise recipe in my book, but this I wish I had discovered and experimented with before I wrote my book as it really deserves to be in there. This recipe is way simpler, cheaper, easier, lighter and smoother than the other recipes (which are still delish don't get me wrong) and requires only 6 ingredients and under 2 minutes of your time. It will make the perfect condiment to accompany your picnics and barbecues this summer. The search for the greatest vegan, plant based, all-natural mayonnaise is over. You're welcome.

Components

1/2 teaspoon lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon smooth / dijon mustard or mustard powder (optional)
60lm of the water drained from a tin of chickpeas (known as Aquafaba - what a fun new word)
2 teaspoons Apple Cider Vinegar or White Wine Vinegar
180ml sunflower oil (plus more if needed)
A generous pinch of himalayan pink / sea / rock salt
You can also add a few drops of natural syrup, if you are used to a slightly sweeter flavour

Process

Simply measure all of the ingredients apart from the oil into a tall container / jug. Using a hand blender / immersion blender, blend for around 45-60 seconds, until frothy. Then, very gradually, begin to add the oil whilst the blender is still running. Add the oil slowly, bit by bit, making it last for around 1-2 minutes. Lift the blade out of the mixture from time to time to allow air to circulate and for an even blend. Once all of the oil is used up, you should have a fully emulsified result; a thick, creamy and smooth mayonnaise with a glossy texture. If you want it even thicker, add up to 60ml more oil (you really shouldn't need to though).

Season with extra salt, lemon juice or vinegar, to taste.

+ If you don't have an immersion blender, you can do this in a standard blender too. I haven't tried it but I'm sure it will work fine. It might be wiser to double the measurements in order to give your blender more to work with. I sometimes find if the blender isn't full enough, it doesn't blend so effectively.

Store covered or in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

Vegan Mushroom & Walnut 'Neat-ball' Meatballs

Vegetarian, Vegan, Dinner, Recipe, Gluten freedanielle coppermanComment

I've never been much of a meatball eater, but for some reason I felt drawn to try my hand at a meat-free version of them this week. Although I occasionally eat meat (only really chicken and fish), I love discovering dishes that use innovative plant-based ingredients to replicate meaty or meat-based products. Whilst I don't mind tofu or tempeh, nothing feels as rewarding or tastes as good as using fresh ingredients in their whole form to make something entirely new and innovative from scratch. For this, I turn to mushrooms. Their rich, earthy and meaty flavour and juiciness add a deep flavour to any dish they are used in, and I find they make offer a really flavoursome alternative to meat, unlike tofu and tempeh which don't taste of much at all. 

These mushroom 'meatballs' are full of flavour (with the help of fresh and dried herbs) and cook to the perfect texture; juicy and chewy in the middle, crisp on the outside. I stirred them through an simple homemade basil and tomato pasta sauce and served them with gluten free spaghetti, but you could also use shop-bought sauces, red or green pesto or serve them with your favourite homemade sauce. I've left recipes for homemade passata and sundried tomato pesto from my book, below.

Components

Makes 10-15 'meatballs', serving 2 main meal portions

300g chestnut or button mushrooms, sliced (you can use a selection of any kind of mushroom - portobello would also be nice)
2-3 tablespoons coconut or olive oil, for frying and greasing
50g walnuts (can also use other nuts or seeds such as almonds or pumpkin seeds)
50g gluten-free oats
8 tablespoons ground almonds
50g sun dried tomatoes (or 4 tablespoons tomato puree / paste)
1 handful fresh spinach
1 garlic clove (optional)
About 1 tablespoon fresh rosemary
A few leaves of fresh basil
A few sprigs fresh thyme
1/2 teaspoon dried herbs (I like oregano, basil and thyme)
1/2 teaspoon ground paprika
2 tablespoons ground flaxseeds (aka linseeds) or milled chia seeds
4 tablespoons buckwheat flour (or other gluten-free flour)
Pinch of salt or 1 teaspoon tamari

Elevate it
20g black or green olives
1/2 teaspoon Reishi powder
1/2 teaspoon Shilajit powder

Method

Preheat the oven to 180c.

Start by slicing the mushrooms a few times lengthways and then cut them in half down the middle. In a frying pan, fry the mushrooms and garlic (if using) in 1-2 tablespoons of your chosen oil. Fry for around 5-10 minutes until the mushrooms soften and begin to brown and caramelise slightly. Meanwhile, start making the base for the 'meatballs'.

Measure the walnuts and oats into a food processor and pulse until they become a flour-like consistency. Add the ground almonds, sun dried tomatoes (or tomato puree), spinach, fresh rosemary, fresh basil, fresh thyme, dried herbs of choice, paprika, tamari (or salt) and ground flaxseeds or milled chia seeds and blend again until the mixture forms a thick paste. 

Once the mushrooms are done, transfer just over half of them to the food processor, and reserve the remainder on a chopping board to cool. Blend a final time, for about 30 seconds, until the mushrooms combine into the paste. Scrape the mixture into a medium mixing bowl.

Dice the remaining mushrooms into small chunks and stir them through the paste mixture. Then add the buckwheat flour (or other gluten-free flour) and stir with a spatula or wooden spoon to combine.

Grease a baking tray with a little oil and then form the mixture into small balls using your hands. Make them the same size you'd expect a standard meatball to be; about 1 or 1.5 inches by 1 or 1.5 inches. Place them a little apart on the baking tray.

Place in the pre-heated oven and bake for 30-35 minutes, until brown and crisp on the outside. 

Add the 'meatballs' to your desired sauce or serve as you wish. They are quite falafel-like, so could also be enjoyed added to salads or served with houmous as a snack. I love them either in pesto, tomato pesto or tomatoey pasta sauce, or stirred through mushroom gravy and served with potatoes.

+ Alternatively, you could flatten these into burger shapes and either bake in the oven or throw on the barbecue; they work perfectly!

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Sun Dried Tomato Pesto

Serves 2-4

Components

80g sun dried tomatoes
60g fresh tomatoes (any size, roughly chopped)
1 handful fresh basil leaves
80ml extra virgin olive oil
50g almonds or cashews
1 tsp lemon juice or 1⁄4 tsp apple cider vinegar
1 crushed garlic clove
2 tbsp nutritional yeast
pinch of salt
pepper

Method

Blend the sundried tomatoes, fresh tomatoes, fresh basil, olive oil, nuts of choice, lemon juice or apple cider vinegar, garlic, nutritional yeast and salt in a high speed blender or food processor until smooth but still slightly chunky. If you'd prefer a smoother consistency, simply blend for longer until you are happy with it. Season further, to taste.

Roasted Red Pepper & Tomato Passata

Serves 2-4

2 red peppers, chopped
4 medium tomatoes, chopped
1⁄2 white onion or shallot, chopped
1–2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
60ml water or stock (or unsweetened plant- based milk) 
2 tbsp nutritional yeast
handful of fresh basil leaves
1⁄2 red chilli, finely chopped (optional)
Pinch of salt
Ground black pepper

Method

Arrange the red peppers, tomatoes, onion and garlic on a baking tray, drizzle with a little olive oil and sprinkle with a pinch of salt. Roast for 25–30 minutes, until the vegetables become soft and the peppers begin to darken at the edges. Heat 1 tablespoon of the extra virgin olive oil in a saucepan over a medium heat. Once hot, add the chilli, if using, and sauté for 4–5 minutes. Add half the roasted vegetables. Put the remaining vegetables in a blender, add the water or stock and nutritional yeast and blend on a high speed for 20–30 seconds, until smooth. Pour into the pan with the chilli and whole roasted vegetables and heat through. Season to taste. When you are happy with the flavour, either add the cooked pasta to the pan to coat it in the sauce, or divide your pasta among bowls and pour the sauce over the top. Garnish with basil, a drizzle of the remaining extra virgin olive oil and an extra sprinkle of salt and pepper. Add black olives, flaked tuna or anchovies and spinach to the sauce for a puttanesca-style pasta dish.