WELL BEING & OTHER STORIES

Recipes, rituals and other stories to realign the body and mind

Sustainability

Spring Summer Wishlist & Style Inspo

Essentials, Lifestyle, Inspiration, Monthly Essentials, Style, Summer, Sustainabilitydanielle coppermanComment

Whilst I don’t advocate buying new or more things, I like to take inspiration from current trends which then helps inform my shopping experiences in second hand shops, vintage stores and markets. Below you’ll find an edit of things I’m currently loving, either physically by making a few key investments, or from afar and for inspiration only.

I am so passionate about shopping responsibly and really want to encourage people to do the same. If you won’t use or wear an item more than 30 times, don’t buy it. We need to veer away from the disposability of the fast-fashion industry. Buy things that will last, and don’t fall into the traps of ‘seasons’ or ‘trends’ when buying for yourself. Take inspiration from these things, but don’t feel you have to buy all the new trends, because that basically means compulsive shopping and theres better ways to spend your time (and money). Instead, buy inter-seasonal pieces, things that you can edit and alter throughout the year by styling them differently. Invest in sustainable key pieces like your basics, your underwear and the essentials you wear most days, and then put a limit on how many new pieces you buy if there is something you really love and want.

I’ve included a selection of high street brands below but, mostly, you’ll find ethical, sustainable, second-hand and vintage brands. I hope these inspire your summer wardrobe with beachwear, holiday essentials, summer wedding guest options and more.

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Earth Day 2019: Earth-Friendly Tips From 13 Inspiring Insiders

Essentials, Inspiration, Lifestyle, Natural Living, Rituals, Sustainability, Vegandanielle copperman1 Comment

You know by now that I’m super conscious of the damage we are doing to our planet, and constantly striving to reduce my impact on the environment (unless it’s a positive one!). I love discovering new products and ways to swerve more commercial products or ways of doing things which - it’s becoming clearer and clearer - use up devastating amounts of energy and/or resources. Wherever possible, I opt for sustainably and ethically produced goods, ideally made with limited or no packaging, and made from either recycled, recyclable or biodegradable materials that won't stick around on our planet or disrupt our atmosphere for decades after we’ve disposed of them.

As with many things, there is so much to learn, and there are endless new products and methods to discover. That’s why, this Earth Day, I asked some of my friends of whom are on their own sustainability journeys, to share some of their favourite or recently-adopted eco-friendly life hacks. I am constantly finding new inspiration and discovering new things to try in order to do my bit, and I hope that by sharing several stories from people at different stages on their own sustainability journeys will inspire you to try at least one or maybe even all of them.

Happy Earth Day 🌎#ProtectOurSpecies

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Millie Mackintosh, model, entrepreneur & author

How do you make an effort to reduce your impact on the planet on a daily / weekly / monthly basis?

1. I use eco-friendly cleaning products (I’m currently loving Method)
2. I recycle
3. I use food storage boxes rather than cling-film in the fridge
4. I always carry a metal or glass water bottle to avoid buying bottled water in plastic or single-use glass
5. I’ve stopped using plastic cotton buds and straws
6. I have a keep cup for take-out coffee
7. I like to buy clothes from brands that used recycled fabric
8. I only eat meat once a week and am eating a lot more plant-based in general

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Cora Hilts, Founder of Reve en Vert

What’s one of the most important pieces of advice you would give to someone trying to make more conscious and sustainably lifestyle choices?

My two tips for living a more sustainable lifestyle are to educate yourself and to look outside of your own personal desires a bit more. Educate yourself with reliable news stories, get interested in science, watch things like Conspiracy and David Attenborough’s Our Planet. You will likely find yourself wanting to change rather than thinking of it as something taxing you have to do. And think of personal desire secondary to our collective needs - it’s just one Evian for my yoga class, it’s just one steak I am craving, it’s just one jump in the car. We are all contributing to this massive problem of pollution and emissions, so either think ahead or go without from time to time - it won’t hurt you, and it certainly won’t hurt the planet.

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Eva Ramirez, wellness & travel writer

What’s one recent change you’ve made in your routine to reduce waste?

I’ve become a lot more conscious of food waste recently, and I’m far more conscious about not letting things like a bruised plum or bunch of wilted parsley - which I would have otherwise thrown out - go unused. It’s made me a bit more creative in the kitchen, and my food processor and slow cooker have certainly got more action (I’ve been making pestos, soups and vegetable curries where wilted ingredients get completely disguised) and I feel a lot better about the food I’m eating too. I’m also using my freezer a lot more to avoid things going off and to waste - something my grandma is particularly proud of!

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Caroline Deisler, plant-based fitness blogger

1. Eating a plant-based diet has so many environmental benefits and it motivates me even more to promote that lifestyle. I feel more connected to our wonderful planet than ever before and love the feeling of eating a colorful diet that doesn’t involve any cruelty.

2. Other switches I made to reduce my environmental footprint is to get around by bike instead of Uber! I feel so much better as well, getting some fresh air instead of being stuck in traffic. :-) I‘m also really trying to cut down my plastic consumption 🙌🏼 I now have reusable shopping bags, reusable fruit & veggie bags for the fridge and got a water filter installed under the zink to stop buying plastic bottles.

+ I will also launch my swim line @caroswim_ this summer and put a big focus on sustainability. All materials are eco friendly, either partly or fully made from recycled materials and the packaging involves no plastic as well which I‘m really happy about. :-)

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Melissa Hemsley, chef and author

What’s your favourite go-to recipe to use up ingredients on their last legs, to avoid things going to waste?

An easy and delicious way to clean out the fridge, not waste food and make something great for a breakfast / packed lunch / snack is to do a "Friday Frittata" . Anything goes, you don't even need to chop anything, sometimes it's grated onion, carrot and cheese, sometimes I just tear up the ends of soft herbs like basil or dill and the last of the limp rocket. It's always different, always delicious and it's about 5 minutes of effort.

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Madeleine Shaw, author & blogger

Can you share your top 3 favourite eco-friendly tips?

1. Picking up the odd fruit & veg - As well as local markets, lots of big supermarket chains are now putting on display loose and often mis-shaped fruit and veg! These poor little guys normally become waste, so I like to pick these up and make a veggie hot pot with them, where it doesn’t matter how they look.

2. Turn on Aeroplane mode - I feel like my phone is always dying on me, and before it does, I need to urgently put in on charge. But, I've consciously tried to start putting it on aeroplane mode to save the battery and save electricity. A small change, but it means I get some time off of my phone and also helps lower my carbon footprint.

3. Who am I ordering from? - I have started to be more conscious about the companies I order stuff from, whether it's food, clothing or toys for Shay. I like to look at their values and also how they wrap and package the products that get sent to me. There are so many choices online for buying stuff, and it only takes 5 more minutes to find a more sustainable company for the things you need.

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Olivia Crighton, founder of Glasshouse Salon

Can you share some simple tips for anyone wanting to clean up their beauty and hygiene regimes? And any other habits you’ve adopted and would like to share?

  1. When it comes to my beauty cupboard, I’m a big fan of using Yoni’s plastic free and 100% organic cotton tampons. The material is designed to biodegrade after use and is free from the potentially harmful chemicals included in traditional feminine care products.

  2. I have also recently started using the OrganiCup. I learnt that the average woman uses up to 11,000 single use tampons in her life, so this is a great way to significantly reduce bathroom waste.

  3. I’ve also swapped my toothbrush for a bamboo Truthbrush and have been using beauty products that are packaged in glass, paper or aluminium as much as possible.

  4. I’ve followed a plant-based diet for many years now, but recently I have been making the extra effort to cook more at home and avoid processed and packaged foods to minimise packaging and lower my carbon footprint. I think it’s important generally to consider the environmental output of the foods you eat, choosing to opt for locally grown and organic produce where possible.

  5. It’s difficult to avoid buying all the sweet children’s outfits I come across for my daughter, but I really feel the fashion industry’s carbon footprint and nasty bi-products that contaminate our oceans cannot be ignored any longer. I try to minimise the number of new outfits I buy and opt for second hand options whenever I can. When I do buy a new piece however, I’ve found that buying higher quality items from more sustainable materials last longer, helping me to buy less overall.

  6. For any new mums, I’d also recommend looking into alternatives for basic baby items such as reusable, washable and biodegradable nappies, and biodegradable baby wipes. Traditional nappies can take up to 400 years to decompose and can contain harsh chemicals that could be bad for baby and for the environment too.

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Genevieve Gralton, founder of Underbares

Tell us what it’s like running an ethical, sustainable brand, and any personal daily habits you’d like to share on reducing waste and avoiding single-use items:

In my personal life, I intentionally avoid purchasing single-use plastics by always carrying a bag with me for groceries, a S'well bottle, and, if picking up food on the go, avoiding any extra packaging or plastic silverware! For my business, Underbares, all of our packaging is either created from recycled materials, biodegradable, or full recyclable. There's a lot of waste in the world--I don't want to add to it

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Zanna Van Dyke, fitness blogger

What’s one major change you’ve made recently in a conscious effort to love and care for the Earth, and how can we all do our bit to keep our immediate and local natural surroundings thriving?

The main change I have made is raising my awareness of our impact on the natural environment in day to day life. If I see trash in nature, I pick it up. It is as simple as that. Removing plastic, glass or cardboard from the natural environment helps reduce the risk of it impacting wildlife and causing further damage.

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Sjaniël Turrell, natural make up artist

I think the most effective change I’ve made over the last while was making the decision to start using only reusable wash cloths instead of wipes for changing nappies at home and only using wipes (biodegradable of course) on the run. I’m busy and exhausted most of the time so I would love to be one of those mums who only uses rewashable nappies, but as a freelancer without a nanny or cleaner I have to be realistic about what I could manage from day to day. Using washable cloths instead of wipes at home has changed my wipes usage from 3-4 packs per month to about 1 pack every 3 - 4 months - it’s one small change but I was amazed at how much of a difference it made!

Secondly, I have started using balm and oil cleansers to remove makeup with an organic cotton muslin that I can wash out after each use - I do this before washing my face with my favourite gentle cleanser from Twelve Beauty. This has saved me on using copious amounts of disposable cotton pads which I couldn’t live without before.

These aren’t massively life altering changes but I believe if we all make these small doable changes our collective choices have massive implications on positive impact for the earth. It’s about numbers of people making changes, not numbers of things for one person to change.

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Phoebe Torrance

What are some of your favourite eco-friendly swaps you have made over the years?

Firstly, stopping eating red meat - after a while I didn’t even miss it, I actually started to feel healthier and got my iron from sources like veggies, nuts and seeds. Secondly, bringing my reusable coffee cup everywhere I go - it even gets you money off in shops. Thirdly, using reusable makeup remover cloths which you can wash after use and re-use. And finally, always bringing my own tote everywhere, where, again you save money not having to pay for a plastic one! It’s about making little steps yourself that make a huge difference, and if we all did several small things, there would be a real change!

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Pauline Hansen, Founder of Pama London

You make gorgeous activewear from natural materials. What’s something you’re particularly proud of or excited about this year?

I’m super excited to be working with Econyl which is going to be one of our newest fabrics used in our leggings and bras. It’s made out of plastic waste from the oceans, meaning it not only recycles plastic waste, but also contributes to cleansing the oceans too! Our new Moon & Stars collection is all about cleaning up the oceans and preserving it. The products are also all recyclable, creating a circular economy for the journey of our clothes. I believe people should buy more clothes made with fabrics like Econyl, and that would be my top tip to anyone wanting to make positive changes to their habits. Buy less clothing and other things made from synthetic materials, and more

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Pip Roberts, Yoga Teacher

What ‘s your favourite life-changing adaptation been in your daily routine?

Ditching pre-made / shop-bought mylks. Environmental reasons go beyond the impact of cattle farming and back to the single use plastics we use for milk, so I am making an effort not to use tetra-packed mylks.

I blitz up vegan milk (my favourites are oat (so cheap!) and black sesame), in the vitamix each morning, storing any left over in the fridge in glass bottles for later.

Get going with this eco-friendly starter pack

Must See Sustainability Documentaries & Environmental Documentaries

The Best Eco-Friendly, Ethical & Independent Activewear Brands and Their Best Pieces

Essentials, Lifestyle, Movement, Natural Living, Style, Sustainabilitydanielle coppermanComment
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Since embarking on my journey of living a more eco-friendly life, I have come across so, so many incredible brands doing amazing and conscientious things. I could go on and on about them all, and I will, but in this instance, let’s talk about activewear.

This was a natural progression for me since initially developing my awareness of health and wellness through fitness. In fact, fitness is where it all started for me, since, as a model, this was something I became growingly aware of and interested in in order to stay fit and in shape. Then, as my interests expanded and spread across different industries, including food, mindfulness, beauty and environmental issues, I began to seriously question the fashion industry and its ethics. And since my daytime wardrobe is predominantly activewear-based these days, I felt super inspired to apply all that I’ve learnt about the fashion industry and sustainable style to my activewear sourcing.

So, or you’re hitting the gym hard in the quest to earn your Thanksgiving and Christmas binges, I think these activewear brands have something for you. Or, if you welcome this time of year as one to hibernate completely, excusing yourself from any extra activity that isn’t absolutely necessary, the pieces these brands create have extra stretch and are super soft and flexible, so are ideal, exercise or not.

Girlfriend collective

Girlfriend activewear is easily one of my favourites, for their simple yet functional designs, and such a vast array of unique block colours. I love their Lite range, made with Econyl - which contains recycled plastics retrieved from the ocean. Their opinion: “Old fishing nets look better on you than they do at the bottom of the ocean”.

Pama

Combining eco friendly fabrics and sustainable practices with fashion to create chic, high-performance activewear, Pama were one of the first environmentally mindful activewear brands I ever came across. I adore that their products are made from natural materials like bamboo and charcoal, and they are so beautiful and wearable. I practically live in their chakra shorts during the summer.

Vyayama

Vyayama is another of my first and favourite discoveries in natural activewear. They use only natural fibers which are OEKOTEX® certified, sourced sustainably and made ethically. Their designs are super unique, and whilst some of their prints are lively, they are incredibly wearable and chic unlike a lot of bright and over the top patterns rife in activewear these days! It’s all so comfortable and I live in this even when I’m not working out!

Peak and Flow

Peak and Flow’s mantra goes something like this: “For us, sustainability isn't just about the selection of better materials and where we create the product, it's also about creating clothing that is built to last, cross-functional and reduces how much you need in your wardrobe. We work tirelessly to make every stage of the product lifecycle better for the planet”. I like supporting companies whose values align with my own, and I also like these, which are made from recycled ocean plastics, recycled industry waste and recycled plastic bottles.

Sports Philosophy

Sports Philosophy’s products are made with carefully sourced materials that are breathable, sweat-wicking, UV-protective and piling-resistant. Everything is ethically done, and they even have their own charity which fights child labour within the fashion industry. Find out more here.

Silou

This independent brand from London offers super chic, body-enhancing designs, all of which are ‘mindfully manufactured’. This new bralette is a fave.

Phat Buddha

Based in NY, Phat Buddha make flattering collections for all body shapes, so you don’t have to be a super slender yogi in order to pull off their designs. Their crops are super cute, and these V-neck leggings are insanely flattering for any body shape. They use organic materials, most of which are completely and safely biodegradable.

Adrenna

Adrenna was born from the desire to pursue a more intelligent and environmentally conscious way of producing and enjoying activewear, without having to sacrifice style, function or quality. Adrenna are passionate about tackling mass-production, so they only produce what and when is needed. Their activewear also minimises impact on the environment, since they produce in small batches, source locally and work as much as possible to zero-waste production. What’s more, Adrenna offer made-to-order services, and, using the finest technical eco-fabrics from Italy, allows you to customise certain features of your activewear.
This sports bra, which comes in several colours, is such a flattering and functional shape.

Allbirds

Allbirds are one of my favourite shoe brands, and they are doing incredible things. Their shoes are made with technical and functional materials, and are 100% natural. You won’t find any cheap or synthetic materials, and these shoes, although slightly pricier than most, are build to last, and also to leave as little an impact on the planet once you’ve done with them. Made from wool, recycled bottles, castor bean oil, trees and sugarcane made into Sweetfoam soles. I live in these and these.

Milochie

A super sustainable company on many levels, Milochie products are made with 92% Tencel®, Miloflex® - whic is an incredibly sustainable material, made from wood-pulp which comes from sustainably harvested Beech trees that are turned into fabric using a super-efficient closed loop system, that re-uses 99% of its waste. The fibres of their products are also naturally anti-bacterial, sweat-wicking, and biodegradable. I love their patterned shorts.

Vaara

Vaara is by far one of the most beautiful activewear brands, and every pieces is insanely aesthetically pleasing. The designs are simple and chic, not too bright and totally wearable, even when you’re not heading to a workout. They’re the kind of leggings you wouldn’t be embarrassed to be caught wearing on a late night supermarket run for emergency snacks. Material-wise, they select the finest materials, caring for the detail and working with only the best manufacturers in the world to thoughtfully tailor each piece. I’d say functionality is more suited to yoga and pilates than high intensity workouts, and love this set and these shorts are perfect for the summer.

Varley

Varley’s designs performance driven, timeless, wearable pieces that you will come back to again and again. They differentiate themselves through innovation, product performance and quality, and whilst sustainability is not something they shout about, they use high-quality materials and produce in much smaller batches compared to activewear giants. I love their super elegant Walsh Bra and pretty much any of their leggings; all of which come in a vast array of colours and patterns.

Alternative Apparel

Eco-friendly, organic, recycled, Fair Labor Certified and Green Business Certified, Alternative Apparel have a variety of clothing, not specifically activewear, but you’ll find some loungewear and loose-fitting tees and leggings. Their garments are crafted with sustainable materials & processes, including organic & recycled materials, low-impact dyes & water-conserving washes, and all of their packaging is biodegradable.

Outdoor Voices

I love the ethos at Outdoor Voices of making working out fun. “We believe in going out and Doing Things. Moving our bodies and having fun. Let's let go of our expectations, rules, should’s and should nots. Let's have fun, be free, make discoveries, make friends, and make progress. Let's start #DoingThings together”. They use just four core materials and source textiles sustainably, including their sustainably-sourced merino wool and recycled polyester made from water bottles. They have a relatively small collection, producing in smaller batches than your usual high street stores.

Groceries Apparel

Made from 100% organic recycled materials, Groceries Apparel offer all kinds of items, from daywear to intimates. I love their bras and tees to throw over my core activewear pieces.

Sharehope

Sharehope are doing so, so many great things, and too many for me to list here. Find out about them here and check out their do-good leggings.

Evveervital

A beautiful range of athleisure apparel made with innovative materials that are ethically sourced and responsibly manufactured, without sacrificing style, quality and performance. Take a look at this, this, this and this.

Reformation

I adore everything Reformation, especially this statement: “Being naked is the #1 most sustainable option. We’re #2”. Everything they create is super ethical and sustainably done, their own-brand made in small batches and their site also supporting other small brands doing things they approve of. Check out their activewear picks here.

Free People

Just about everything.

Riley Studio

I love Riley Studio’s loungey collection, and wear the hoodies everytime I go running, or to get me from a to be; or more specifically from home to class. Through extensive research and development we aim to source fabrics that have been created from waste materials or from natural fabrics that are biodegradable. Sustainability is at the core of our philosophy and we are working towards becoming part of a circular economy by choosing fabrics such as ECONYL®, which is infinitely recyclable. In an attempt to also alleviate the plastic waste crisis across the globe, we use fabrics such as rPET, which is made from PET packaging and industrial waste.

Threads 4 Thought

Threads for Though use sustainable materials and create products that leave an innately smaller impact on our environment, support in-need communities, and assist in changing the narrative of ethical standards within the fashion industry. Their ‘Reactive’ collection uses recycled plastics, and their other collections are all just as virtuous.

Boody

Boody use OEKO-TEX certified bamboo to make their beautiful basics, and buying from them you can rest assured that you’re supporting fair wage production and positive work ethics. Their products are all vegan and they even use eco-friendly packaging. I love their underwear, their leggings and this cami body. Find out more here.

Pact

“We believe in crafting clothing differently: Sustainable materials, kindness towards humans and the softest clothing you’ll want on every layer”. Pact’s products are organic and fair trade and are made without toxic chemicals, and steer well clear of sweatshop/child labor. Sounds like the kind of brand we need more of, right? Browse here.

Shift to Nature

“At Shift to Nature we set about sourcing high quality products that are made carefully from certified organic textiles, responsibly to those who make it, and with consideration to our customers. We source beautiful clothes and bed linen from both Australia, Europe and India”. Shop not just activewear, but a variety of wardrobe basics and essentials like underwear, here.

Carrot Banana Peach

Carrot Banana Peach is an organic plant based clothing brand, created almost twenty years ago and inspired during a trip to the rainforests of Malaysia. The collections they carry include bamboo yoga clothing, banana fitness clothes, soybean retreat wear and Aloe Vera clothing and accessories. So clever!

Live The Process

I love anything Live The Process do, especially this: “Live The Process is ethically made in America by women who are dedicated to creating your high quality product. Our high standards of care for this creative process come from our dream to make the world a better place. From the cutting of our luxurious fabrics to the packaging that your items are shipped in, we make sure every step of our process is helping achieve our goal of reducing environmental impact and embracing American labor.” Every piece they make is so effortlessly beautiful yet functional; just take a look at this, this, these and these and then try not to buy everything else on the site.

Assist Your Workouts

I use these in every single workout I do at home.

These are complete game changers and take your home workout to new levels.

Cardio that’s actually fun.

Intensify your workout with one of these or these.

Not just for pilates, these and these are amazing for all kinds of ab, thigh and glute reps.

To go with you everywhere and to avoid excessive plastic bottle consumption.

One of my favourite post-workout snacks: in this flavour, this flavour, this flavour and this flavour.

Experiment with pre-workout supplements or drinks, for endurance and stamina.

Try adding these and / or these to your daily routines, which are known to assist in fat burning and muscle repair.

How Saving the Planet Can Also Save You Money

Sustainabilitydanielle coppermanComment
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It’s no secret that our modern-day behaviour and habits are beginning to their toll on our planet, our environment and the atmosphere. More and more people come to me asking for suggestions when it comes to buying alternatives to things like single-use items, things made of plastic or just generally toxic materials that could be easily avoided. I try to encourage people to make simple swaps from unnecessary products to reusable ones, to inspire others that their small changes really can have an impact on the planet. But I also like to inspire people with the incentive that they can actually help themselves, too. Making more sustainable / eco-friendly decisions can help you both long term and short term, in several ways.

1. Short term, using more eco-friendly products and things made with more natural materials and ingredients is better for things like your skin, your health, your home and you bank account.

2. Long term, using more eco-friendly products and things made with more natural materials and ingredients is better for the planet, be that the oceans or the air we breath, and this has a knock on effect on the wellbeing of all living things. Cleaner oceans means cleaner air, which of course we need in order to survive. This could also lead to reduced risks of disease.

If it’s not enough to inspire you to make environmentally considerate decisions for the good of the planet, I’ve collected some facts and figures to do with how much we currently spend on disposable items and unnecessary modern commodities. I’ve also provided the more sustainable alternatives along with their prices, to show how much money you could save over the years by making some simple changes and minimal upfront investments.

Cotton buds
Instead of buying in small packs, buy your cotton buds - made from paper or wood, rather than plastic - in bulk, and save around £20 per year (depending on how many you tend to use). This is also something that, the more bulk you buy in, the more you will save over the years. These ones are just over £1 per 100, but you can definitely find them cheaper in stores or elsewhere online.

Cloth vs wet wipes
Instead of buying loads of wet wipes, use reusable cloths, such as muslin cloths. You can soak these in water with soap or even oils, if you need moisture, or use dry, as needed. You could even use toilet paper as a slightly better alternative to wet wipes. If you stop buying wet wipes (some people use 100 per week on their babies), you’d save hundreds of pounds over the years. Buying muslin cloths in bulk will mean you’ll always have a lot to hand, and muslin cloths can be as cheap as less than 50p each.

Reusable wrap & sandwich bags vs cling film
Something you seem to be buying again and again and again, am I right? Next time, instead of using cling film to keep things fresh or to wrap portable meals in, try using bee wrap or reusable silicon sandwich bags, instead. A set of 3 sheets of bee wrap will set you back about £10-£12, and a Stasher sandwich bag will cost about the same, but you’ll only have to buy them once, unless you have to replace them over time. Say you are buying a few rolls of cling film per month, which can be around £2-£3 per roll, thats around £50 per month you could be saving. Take away the cost of some bee wrap and / or reusable sandwich bags, and you’ll still have more money left over out of your current cling film budget.

Soap vs shower gel
I was talking about this with my mum the other day. We were discussing how we used to be just fine using soap, before all these mass produced, colourfully and enticingly marketed products like bath foam and shower gel came along. Soap is, or was, much more environmentally friendly, as it was cheap to make, made using only natural ingredients, and wasn’t full of chemicals or other toxic components (such as artificial colourings, foaming agents, flavourings etc), meaning it didn’t pollute our water supplies either once washed down the drain. Let’s get back to basics and opt for soap instead of manufactured, plastic-bottled products we don’t really need (and that aren’t very good for us, either!). Buy soap in bulk, either in individual blocks or larger blocks that you can then cut into smaller blocks as and when you need them. You could even look into making soap yourself from scratch. Say you buy new shower gel once a month (some people may be buying much more), that’s got to be at least £4 per month (if you’re buying the cheapest (and usually most harmful) options), totalling a minimum spend of roughly £50 per year. Soap, on the other hand, lasts longer and costs less, and generally comes with minimal packaging (and if you can find it, usually cardboard rather than plastic).

If you do prefer liquid soaps, try to find more natural options, and buy in bulk. You can buy from several eco-friendly brands in bulk for something like £20-£30 for 5 litres, or you can also go to shops that have refill stations. You are encouraged to take your empty bottles and refill them, rather than repeat buying the individual bottle product. This will save you money, yet again, as refills are priced cheaper than the original products.

Shampoo & Conditioner
The same goes for shampoo, you can now buy shampoo and conditioner in bar form, made from natural ingredients. These are better for the environment and the water supplies, and also tend to last longer, too.

Alternatively, If you do prefer liquid shampoos and conditioners, try to find more natural options, and buy in bulk, or go to shops that have refill stations. You are encouraged to take your empty bottles and refill them, rather than repeat buying the individual bottle product. This will save you money, yet again, as refills are priced cheaper than the original products.

Washing up liquid
Again, washing up liquid is these days manufactured by the masses and highly over-processed, contaminating our water supplies as it drains away. Try to buy more natural and environmentally friendly products and either buy them in bulk to save money, or refill your empty bottles at refill stations in certain shops (most common in whole food / health food shops or zero-waste shops). Refilling could save you around so much money, and will also save the planet from hundreds of plastic bottles.

Reusable fabric cotton pads vs single-use cotton pads
One of my favourite sustainable swaps has been switching my everyday cotton pads, which I used daily to remove make up, for reusable pads made of fabric. Cotton requires a lot of water to grow, which puts a strain on the environment, and when made into the disposable cotton pads you’re probably familiar with, its bleached and processed in several ways, making it slightly harmful for your skin but also for the environment, wherever it ends up to decompose. One simple way to reduce your consumption of single-use cotton pads is to use reusable ones made from cotton, just in a different form, or bamboo. Or, even muslin cloths will do the trick. It’s all about changing your habits, as using reusable fabrics will mean you need to wash them after a few uses; something you’re not familiar with having to do for the disposable (and slightly more convenient) ones. But buying reusable cotton pads or even using cloths or scraps of fabrics from old clothes will save you so much money over the years. It costs just £7.69 for 12 of these super soft cotton pads, and they will probably last you forever - regarding you don’t mind a few unsightly mascara stains that might develop over time. I used to use about 2 or sometimes more cotton pads a day, and at between £1-£2 per packet with about 80-100 per pack, thats somewhere around £150 per year, just on cotton pads. Think of those savings over the years.

Bamboo toothbrush vs plastic toothbrush
Buying bamboo toothbrushes is better for the environment as they are able to biodegrade once you’re finished with them, unlike plastic ones. Whilst the pricing here isn’t necessarily astounding, my tip is, again, to buy in bulk, rather than buying individually as and when you need them. I buy bamboo toothbrushes in packs of 5 or 10, which means less packaging, too. Bamboo toothbrushes are around £1-£2 each, but work out cheaper if you buy them in bulk. Whilst this won’t necessarily save you money per piece, compared to the price of plastic toothbrushes, I think making this switch is so worth it for the environment.

Menstrual cup vs tampons pads
This one should have been at the beginning of the post since it saves SO much money, however, it’s not relevant to everyone so I’ll keep it where it is. Ladies, I’ve said it once and I’ll say it again: this sustainable swap is going to change your life forever. I have been using a menstrual cup for a few years now and I have never looked back. I wish these had been available when I first started my period as I think I would have learnt a lot more about the situation and felt a lot more empowered about it too. Tampons are often made with harmful chemicals and whilst that’s bad enough, the way they collect is not great either. They kind of prevent our bodies from fully detoxing, which is ultimately what is happening at this time of the month. Pads too, contain harmful chemicals and whilst they’re kind of better in letting our bodies detox, I personally could never get used to them, and I know a lot of other people can’t either. The menstrual cup is clean, easy to use, comfortable and reliable. I have never had any issues with it, and once it’s in place I forget I’m even wearing it. And the best part, and where the menstrual cup ties into this post, is that it’s sustainable. It is reusable and so means you wont be a) spending constantly on products like tampons and pads and b) won’t be chucking said tampons and pads into waste or landfill, only to take ages to biodegrade and releasing the chemical coatings they contain. The NHS has noted that women will have around 480 periods in a lifetime, and if you’re spending between 50p and £10 each period, depending on which brand of either pads or tampons you opt for (note, organic and less harmful brands will be the more expensive), you could be spending at best £250 and at worst almost £5000 a lifetime on these products. A Mooncup (the first of its kind), on the other hand, is £16.56, and other options are £8.99, £19.99 and £24.95. Need I say anymore?

Keepcup
This one’s not necessarily going to save you money upfront, but with more and more initiatives in place at cafes and eateries across the world, you can save money on your hot drink of choice simply by taking your own reusable coffee cup with you. Using your own reusable cup saves the cafe money, saves the planet from hundreds of single-use disposable coffee cups (which, although usually paper, are often lined with plastic films) and could ultimately save you a % off each purchase.

Reusable water bottles
An obvious one, if you buy and carry a reusable water bottle around with you, you will save money on buying bottles of water. You will also contribute to reducing the amount of plastic bottles consumed. Reusable bottles can be as cheap as recycling a very basic plastic bottle and simply reusing it again and again. Thats, um, basically free. But if you want something a little more durable, leak-proof and sturdy, and / or one with fancy features like insulation or a nice pattern, it’ll cost you anywhere between £4-£45. Even buying the most expensive option, it will be a one of payment, and a very sensible investment. Depending on how much water you consume, you’ll be saving around 60p for large bottles or water or anywhere around £1-3 for small bottles of water, every time you get thirsty. You just couldn’t put a price on that.

Reusable cutlery
This one is another that might not actually save you money - or at least not yet - but it will save the planet from yet more plastic pollution. I’m hoping someday soon there will be bans or taxes on plastic cutlery the same way there has been plastic straws and plastic bags, so if you invest in reusable cutlery now, you’ll be safe. I use bamboo cutlery like this and keep it in my bag, as its light. But you could even use proper cutlery that you already have at home, which, again, doesn’t cost a thing. I’d also suggest a cutlery case to keep things clean, but thats not a necessity at this stage, just an idea (some cutlery sets even come with their own case thrown in).

Tote bags
Having tote bags will save you so much money, these days, and will mean you wont find yourself adding a few pounds onto your weekly shop just for the plastic bags to carry it in. Not only will it save you money, it will save all the plastic bags from making their way into the ocean and contaminating not only our water, but also the sea life, and ultimately our food (if you eat fish or meat). Some places give out free tote bags, such as at large events or free sample hand outs in your areas, but you can also buy cotton or canvas tote bags really cheap online. It could save you a few pounds a shop!

Shopping unpackaged
As far as food is concerned, shopping in bulk, unpackaged, at stores with self-serve dispensers and refill stations, is by far the best option for the planet and your food shop budget. You will save on packaging, and you will also save on waste, as you can fill your own fabric bags, or the paper bags provided, with as much or as little as you need. It will also save you money as bulk ingredients tend to be cheaper than pre-packaged options. The selection is limited, meaning you wont be able to buy bulk chocolate bars or unpackaged ready meals, but the whole point is to start buying more considered foods that are actually good for you, and the planet. I’m not saying you should never enjoy processed or packaged foods, but shopping in bulk will actually mean you get back to basics in the kitchen and you will start to understand food more and more, and how whole and nourishing it can be.

My favourite things to buy in bulk are grains, nuts, seeds, powders (such as cacao, maca), oil and flours, to name a few.

Now, I’m not going to the exact math here, as I don’t know what your personal lifestyle is exactly like, but take a moment to take on board some of the facts and figures in this post that are most relevant to you, and think about the money you might be able to save in the long run if you start investing now in affordable, one-off reusable products like the ones in this post. I’m not saying you need to make all these changes ASAP, but it’s just something to think about.

Sustainable Swaps to Live More Consciously ~ for The Welle Co

Commisions, Lifestyle, Natural Living, Rituals, Sustainability, Wellbeingdanielle coppermanComment
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KNOWING EXACTLY WHICH EVERYDAY ITEMS YOU CAN SWAP, AND WHAT FOR, GOES A LONG WAY TOWARDS LIVING A HEALTHIER AND MORE SUSTAINABLE LIFE. DANIELLE COPPERMAN EXPLAINS WHY.

Sustainability is a hot topic right now. It’s no secret that human behaviour is taking its toll on the earth and people can no longer deny that the way we act (and more specifically, consume) is unsustainable.

Modern life has progressed so much and whilst we now have more than ever, we also seem to want more than ever, too. We crave more and more possessions, newer and newer things… when in actuality, basic human needs are really very little. As a result of recent warnings, such as the amount of plastic in the ocean equating to more than the amount of fish come 2050 (yikes!), I’m on an ongoing journey of overhauling my lifestyle to make it more sustainable.

I know first-hand that it can seem quite intimidating to know where to start when it comes to making impactful changes. But there are so many things you can do, some large and some small, so I’ve outlined a few of my favourite ‘harmful for helpful’ sustainable swaps below that will help you to reduce your consumption and in turn reduce waste, meaning you will have a much lighter impact on the planet this year.

SAY NO TO…

Single use straws

Say NO to plastic straws! If you absolutely need to use a straw, opt for a paper or bamboo straw or a reusable straw made from glass, silicone, recycled (and reusable) plastic or wood. Luckily, many cafés and restaurants are now ditching the disposable straws for more sustainable options, so this swap is getting easier and easier to incorporate into your lifestyle. You could also buy your own and keep one in your bag ICOE.

Takeaway coffee cups

As much as we all love our coffee, the abundance of takeaway cups being tossed into landfill is absolutely killing the planet. Instead of using takeaway cups, invest in a good reusable option such as a Keep Cup, or a reusable glass, plastic or bamboo takeaway-style cup or flask. Your favourite coffee shop will gladly fill it for you.

Disposable cutlery

Say no to disposable, single-use plastic cutlery from cafés. Instead, invest in reusable bamboo cutlery – this is great because you can keep it in your bag at all times. Alternatively, just keep your standard metal cutlery in your bag (however in my opinion they’re a little heavier, louder and less convenient). This set is super handy and comes complete with straws, straw cleaners and a fabric wrap to keep them together and clean.

Standard cotton buds

Swap your standard, plastic stick cotton buds in favour of those made from bamboo, wood or paper, and ideally with organic cotton. As a bonus, the organic cotton is better for your ears as it contains less harmful dyes than the cotton from a standard cotton bud.

Disposable make up removal pads

Swap disposable, single-use cotton wool pads for reusable versions. You can find reusable cotton rounds, or bamboo options, or even make your own from old fabric. Alternatively, use a muslin cloth or flannel to remove make up (instead of going through loads of cotton pads which take a long time to biodegrade and can harm the environment in doing so). Also, buy in bulk, to save of shipping packaging and transportation miles.

Plastic toothbrushes

Swap your plastic toothbrushes for bamboo ones. If you have an electric brush that lasts for longer, don’t worry too much… but for those of you going through a new plastic toothbrush every month or so, swap to bamboo! You’ll be taking care of your teeth and the environment.

Harmful beauty products

Take a look into your make up bag… how many of your products use plastics, parabens, chemicals and other fillers that are harmful for your skin? Those hidden nasties not only clog your pores but also seriously harm the environment (by circulating in our water supplies). Instead, opt for natural beauty products and keep an eye out for brands with recyclable, biodegradable or refillable packaging.

Fast fashion

We’re all guilty of impulsively spending on a trend that we just had to have… but we could all stand to stop buying so much! Next time you fancy a shopping spree, why not head to a charity, thrift or vintage store or a flea market? You’ll find something more unique whilst also finding a new home for something that could otherwise end up in landfill.

Plastic shopping bags

Not only are plastic shopping bags terrible for our planet and wildlife, they’re relatively flimsy, too… so instead, use reusable tote bags or other fabric bags when shopping. You’ll feel good about making a small swap that helps the planet and you’ll fit more in your bags, too.

Bottled water­

Bottled water costs you a pretty penny and contributes greatly to landfill, with as much as 91% of plastic bottles not recycled. Instead, invest in a reusable water bottle. Reusable bottles also come with great features that disposable bottles can’t complete with (such as fruit infusers, thermos protection and filtration), so shop around and find a bottle that fits your needs.

Supermarket shelf sanitary products

For the women out there, you should really rethink your period management and collection methods. Tampons can be dangerous (TSS, anyone?) and surprisingly, even organic tampons are quite unnatural. During menstruation, your body is detoxing itself so it’s really important to ‘let it out’, so to speak. Moon Cups are the most eco-friendly form of feminine care, and they’re cheaper too! The average period cup can last you up to a decade and has the benefit of being leak-proof (bonus!), so­­­ you won’t have to stock up on sanitary supplies every month.

This Simple (And Cheap) Hack Will Give Your Beauty Routine An Instant Eco-Upgrade ~ For Mind Body Green

Anytime, Beauty, Essentials, Lifestyle, Natural Living, Sustainability, Commisionsdanielle coppermanComment

The U.N. warned us: We have 12 years before the damage we've done to the Earth becomes irreversible. Instead of letting reports like this paralyze us, let's use them to empower us. The experts are saying it's going to take a mix of large-scale change AND individual action to save our planet—and we want to help you do what you can. Consider our new series your no-excuses guide to cleaning up your act, one step at a time. Today, we're sharing an eco-friendly hack that will clean up your beauty routine.

When it comes to eco-friendly living, I like to think I'm on top of my game. Well, as much as one can be in this day in age.

I made my first step into a more sustainable lifestyle when I worked as a model. Having a behind-the-scenes look into the fashion industry inspired me to make more conscious decisions about my own wardrobe: buy less, recycle more, and support brands championing natural fabrics. Soon enough, I was spending more time browsing secondhand shops and vintage markets than high-end stores—and it felt good. I was excited to start becoming more mindful in other parts of my life too, and my beauty routine soon took centre stage.

The problem: Some beauty tools aren't great for us—or the planet.

I probably don't need to tell you that the green beauty industry is booming. In my opinion, it's great news: Natural products just feel better on my skin, and they also tend to be healthier for the planet since they are free of ingredients like parabens, paraffins, and other artificial compounds that are resource-intensive to manufacture. A lot of them also come in more sustainable packaging, be it recyclable, refillable, or biodegradable.

All of this is great, but I recognise that it's unrealistic to ask people to overhaul their entire beauty regimen in one go. However, even if the average person can't afford to switch over to green products overnight—they CAN easily update some of the tools in their kit.

Over the years, I've made some super simple and economical swaps in my vanity (think: bamboo toothbrushes for plastic ones and refillable floss containers), but finding an alternative for the masses and masses of cotton pads I use to remove makeup is definitely the one that brings me the most pride.

There are a few problems with standard cotton balls or pads: They can't be reused, and they don't biodegrade quickly. Cotton also requires a lot of water and heavy doses of pesticides and insecticides to grow. Cotton pads are often bleached, too, making them more harmful for our skin and more dangerous to the surrounding environment. When you consider that many of us use at least one of these suckers every single day, this ain't good.

The "one small thing" solution: Ditch your cotton balls or makeup rounds for a reusable option.

I've managed to ditch disposable cotton rounds for a reusable alternative that is kinder to the planet, gentler on my skin, and super absorbent. Win, win, win!

These days, it's pretty easy to find a pack of reusable cotton pads made using 100 percent cotton, fleece, or bamboo online. They often come in the same shapes and sizes as standard cotton pads—the only difference is you can still get more than one use out of them. I usually use the same one about three or four times during the week. Then I simply add it to the rest of my laundry. Most shop-bought reusable cotton pads come in packs of five-plus, meaning you can continue to use fresh ones while the old ones are in the wash.

My Favourite options are these, these, these, these and these. Some come in quite large pack sizes, but share them out with friends or family if you don’t think you’ll get through them all yourself. The more people making small sustainable changes the better!

Keep in mind: Cotton pads are not always guaranteed to be 100 percent cotton and sometimes contain synthetics like rayon or viscose. Read your labels carefully!

If you don't want to shell out the cash for these (though they are cheap!), you can simply use a muslin cloth the same way you would a cotton pad, focusing on one corner of it at a time and rinsing with hot water between uses. When it's time for a refresh, simply add it to the rest of your laundry. You can also make these yourself from old clothes or scrap fabrics.

Even if you don't use cotton rounds to remove makeup, there's bound to be part of your beauty routine that adds up to a lot of trash. Identify it, then see what you can do to cut back.

With all the information out there about how to make eco-friendly changes urgently, it can be intimidating to know where to start. The good news is, there are an infinite amount of tweaks each and every one of us can make that will ladder up to larger change. And these changes can be as small as a cotton ball.

Read the full article here.

Conscious Gift Guide ~ Christmas 2018

Beauty, Essentials, Lifestyle, Natural Living, Style, Sustainabilitydanielle coppermanComment

This year, a lot of my family are planning to buy gifts for others from charity or second hand shops, or from charity websites where you can buy presents to be sent to people in need, sort of on behalf of your own friends or family (like this website here). Our thinking is that none of us actually really need anything new, and instead of accumulating more stuff and potentially creating more waste, we thought that buying from charity shops was a more sustainable way to do things this year. Don’t get me wrong, we will be buying some things from new, but the focus this year is on what we can find that someone might not especially need but might just like. It feels more creative and somehow more thoughtful.

Granted, you can’t find something for everyone in a charity or second-hand shop, and some people might even be offended to receive someone’s hand-me-down’s, so for other ideas (most of which are ethical / sustainable / organic / eco-friendly / natural), read on.

Goop Exfoliating Instant Facial Mask; the perfect addition to winter skin routines, made with natural ingredients, of which 86% are organic.

Aquis Quick Dry Hair Towel. Such a staple in my daily routine and an ideal gift for anyone into the latest (and healthiest) beauty hacks.

Totally obsessed with this. Apparently, they’re believed to improve energy levels, clear the air of a space, aid sleep, reduce static and electromagnetic energy and reduce stress. It also looks nice and makes my space look more warm and welcoming, so I’m sold.

A gift that’s not just for Christmas. I’ve recently been enjoying the Barbican membership in a quest to get out more and do and see new things, and with all the perks, i’m hooked.

This exfoliating coconut shell face mask.

Anything from here.

This, these, this, this, this, this, this, these and this. Oh, Missoma just has an answer to everything. And even, now, a tray for your trinkets.

Another tray for your trinkets.

For the ‘him’s out there: essential oil shaving cream and soothing essential oil post-shave balm.

Stocking fillers in the form of functional natural nourishment.

Spread sustainability this Christmas, with a Keep Cup for everyone you know. Makes a lovely gift for anyone trying to make more environmentally conscious choices.

These Himalayan pink salt tea light holders.

Cos no one can ever have too many crystals.

Rituals' Ayurveda Candle for inner calm and aligned doshas.

Someone you know has got to love these.

Give beauty lovers something new and natural (and aesthetically pleasing) to try.

Had to drop it in somewhere, didn’t I?

Always love discovering new sustainable clothing brands, and have been living in this, made from recycled materials, all Autumn.

Incredible skincare alert.

One of my favourite recently-discovered activewear brands (especially their collections made from Econyl (ocean plastics up-cycled into a unique eco-friendly thread technology)).

This Goop travel wrap (100% cashmere) is coming everywhere with me. I wear it as a scarf or use it as a wrap to keep warm around the house and on long-haul journeys. Perfect for pretty much anyone.

Palo santo and / or sage, for end-of-year cleansing and new year intention setting.

Anything for anyone from here. I’ve especially been loving this.

These for all the hot drinks to come. Definitely toddy appropriate.

This, this or this for new home owners.

Explore Catch Rhys for eco jewellery. I’m obsessed with their simple, minimal chains.

Can’t recommend Angelica Retreat’s Zone Face Lift Facial enough.

A biodegradable phone case. Clever right?

This frame was a hit with my mum as part of her birthday gift last month.

These or these would make wonderful stocking fillers for spiritually curious, and / or those looking for a little grounding, guidance and clarity as they leave behind 2018 and enter the new year.

For candle lovers who just can’t get enough.

Frederic De Malle for a unique selection of perfume, and such a variety to cater for each and every recipient on your gift list this year. The Dries Van Noten is my current fave.

Rose quartz coasters, anyone?

Some old and new book recommendations: this one, this one, this one, this one and this one. And most importantly, this one.

* My ethos and approach to natural living is to try your hardest to make conscious, sustainable and natural and nourishing decisions as much as possible, but in the modern world in which we live, it’s not always possible or, even, preferable. Whatever I buy new tends to be natural and / or sustainable, but there are the occasional items I am given or I choose to try which are not so pure of heart. That’s why you’ll sometimes find a combination of natural / sustainable and not-so-natural / sustainable suggestions in my posts.

Give a Giving Gift This Christmas

Sustainability, Natural Living, Lifestyledanielle coppermanComment

You’re all aware, by now, that I like to live quite a simplified life most of the time (bar some very glam and pretty extra moments as a model and public figure from time to time but, ya know, without them I may not have discovered how to balance things out and I might not have become quite as conscious about things as I am). Never the less, I like to keep things as simple as possible in all areas of my life, and to me that means using, wherever possible, ethical, sustainable, natural and / or eco-friendly products and practices.

Whilst in some ways, most of the ethical, sustainable, natural and eco-friendly brands I share on here are giving something back by refraining from doing dangerous or damaging things to the planet, the brands and items below go even further. They donate a share of their profits to charitable organisations, supporting many causes and driving forward a variety of projects and initiatives. Whether you’re buying for others or for yourself this holiday season, consider one or some of the below and you’ll be giving a lot more than you realise.

1. Love Welcomes Welcome mats

Love Welcomes is a new social enterprise working to create jobs for Syrian women in refugee camps. They make beautiful products for the home out of recycled blankets and life vests, and every time you buy a Love Welcomes product, you’re supporting a refugee and their family as they begin to rebuild lives shattered by war.

2. Soko Jewellery

Authentic and unique pieces of handmade jewellery, ethically made by local artisans in Kenya from recycled materials. Buying these will mean you reuse rather than buying new, which gives back to the environment in the long run, but also supports the communities of women in Kenya who make each piece. I particularly love these and these. Oh, and this ring.

3. Sseko Designs

Leather goods that do good. Er, yessss. Sseko Designs is an ethical fashion brand that hires high potential women in Uganda to make sandals to enable them to earn money through dignified employment that will go directly towards their college educations. Sseko products are all made in Africa and create jobs, empower artisans and help end the cycle of poverty by building healthy communities and economies. These sandals are the ideal gift for anyone with big travel plans, either this holiday season or in the New Year.

6. Kantha Bae

Kantha Bae has partnered with Basha Boutique to create fair-trade, hand-embroidered fabrics The shop supports Bangladeshi women at risk in trafficking environments and helps them to find a home, a job, and safe care for their children. Kantha Bae’s kimonos (and other items) are made from upcycled vintage silk saris and proceeds from all sales support women survivors in West Bengal, India.

6. Swell Water Bottles

You have surely heard of S’well® by now, but are you aware of the good they do with parts of their profits? They are proud partners of UNICEF USA and help to provide clean and safe water to the world’s most vulnerable communities. Through 2018, S’well is focused on supporting water programs across Madagascar – a country where nearly 50% of the population lacks access to clean drinking water. Explore their water bottles here and their full product range here.

7. Qnola Tote Bags

Throughout December, we are proud to be supporting Unicef UK, donating 25% of all tote bag sales to help support children and communities in danger and need.

8. Sezane x Demain

In 2017, Sezane founder, Morgane Sézalory, created the charity initiative, DEMAIN. The initiative raises funds for projects that improve access to education, culture, and equal opportunities for children around the world. Their latest project, the ‘Promise’ t-Shirt, in partnership with Pencils of Promise, helps support projects with the intention of providing quality educational programming in Ghana, Guatemala, Laos and Nicaragua. I adore the t-shirt and have been wearing it day in, day out.

9. Shop in charity shops

Another way to give gifts that give to others is to shop in charity shops. Anything you buy goes towards whichever charity the shop supports, and if you don’t fancy giving something thats been used, you can usually find brand new things items too. Some stores sell gifts like fairtrade chocolate, teas, hampers and card sets, some even sell fairtrade homewares (Oxfam currently have beautiful woven baskets, throws and rugs), and you can often find clothes, books, DVD’s (I know - old school!) and homewares completely unused and which still have their tags on. At least have a browse ;)

10. Mantra Jewellery x Mind

Mantra Jewllery have partnered with mental health charity, Mind, to help support and champion people living with mental illness. MIND’s intention is to encourage people to talk more about mental illness. In support, Mantra Jewellery have created a pendant with the empowering mantra, Strength, from which 25% of sales will be donated to Mind.

11. House of Sunny

House of Sunny is a super cool and creative fashion brand, specialising in effortless day to day staples. Their sustainability efforts are great and they only release a couple of super consciously-produced collections per year. What’s more, they have teamed up with Project 0, and are donating £3 of every purchase of their Save the World tee, to support Project 0’s efforts to restore and protect the ocean. 

12. Found My Animal 

Found My Animal supports animal adoption and promotes rescue over purchase. They also donate profits from their rope and leather animal collars, harnesses, and other pet accessories to animal rescue organisations around the world. If you won’t be getting or giving a pet this Christmas, why not give consciously to your current pets or those of others?

13. Rumba Time

The Jane Collection of Rumba Time’s watches supports a number of charities, with $2 of each purchase going to either Give Directly or Young Survival Coalition. Inspired by friendship bracelets, you who might like one of these?

14. Marina London

Marina London make beautiful silks in small batches and employ ethical practices and high quality silks. This holiday season, they are giving 5% of all sales within their new Black Collection (dropping soon) to Women for Women - a charity dedicated to helping female survivors of war rebuild their lives. Buy for the party season or gift to others. Or ya know, both.

15. Toms Shoes

Toms - the One For One company - gives a pair of shoes to those in need, for every pair purchased. Not only does TOMS provide shoes, they also provide sight, water and safer birth services to people in need, through a number of different initiatives. Find out more here and shop here. Particularly enjoying their new ankle boots and winter slippers.

16. Mudlove Hanging Planter

The perfect gift for plant lovers or those heading into a new home or redecorating. These handcrafted planters brighten up any space, especially in the know that each purchase provides a week's worth of clean water to a family in the Central African Republic. 

17. Anything from here

Well Being & Other Items ~ The Good Store ~ Now Live

Essentials, Lifestyle, Natural Living, Sustainability, Style, Home + Interiorsdanielle coppermanComment
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Those of you subscribed to my newsletter will have already heard about the newest section of the website - the second hand store! I’m super excited for this as I get so many questions (and offers!) over instagram when I post about my charity or vintage store finds. And now, I want to make as many of the things I find available for you guys. I don’t need anymore stuff, but I always find so many amazing things that I know so many people would find a purpose for.

So many of my friends and some people over Instagram complain that they just never find anything good when trawling through charity shops or navigating the overwhelming and never-ending rails of a vintage store. I, on the other hand, adore it and grew up doing it, so, although I don’t always find things, I often do. You have to have a pretty imaginative approach, at times, as you have to find things that match your style or that you could work into your style. Sometimes, you might have to alter or customise things too, which, quite frankly, no one has time for (I guiltily have so many items that I’ve never gotten around to altering which is such a shame but is also just life). But I think the key is to have an open approach and not to go in there with too much expectation. If you have something in mind that you want to find, the chances are you wont find it. But if you treat the experience as more of an exploratory occasion, you never know what you mind end up discovering. More often than not, you don’t need what you find, but it’s nice to purchase something that is unique and not the same as everything else on the high street, which, by the way, you also don’t need.

The Good Store is something of a side project, in all honesty, and won’t be something that gets updated daily or even weekly. It will be updated depending on authentic sourcing (that is - whenever I or others discover new items) and whenever I or others find the time to photograph and upload the listings. If you have any particular requests for items you would like to find in the store or things you are particularly into or looking for, please leave a comment below.

This store place is an effort to slow down the rate of modern consumption and to provide high quality, pre-loved items that can find new owners / homes and purposes. In this way, by buying from The Good Store, you will be recycling and reusing, instead of buying new and adding to the economical and environmental strains, consequential of our highly demanding, consumerist society.

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+ If you have high-quality items that you no longer want or need, and you would like to sell them via The Good Store, email us via the form below with full details and we will endeavour to have them listed on the site. We will determine a selling price and you will receive a % of profits if they sell.

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Inside My Apartment & My Sustainable Wardrobe ~ With What's Your Legacy

Beauty, Business Stories, Essentials, Lifestyle, Inspiration, Natural Living, Style, Sustainability, Video, Commisionsdanielle copperman1 Comment

Last month, I welcomed What’s Your Legacy into my apartment and let them nose around my room and delve into my wardrobe in search of the most ethical and sustainable pieces and to discover the stories behind them. We talked about my business, my book, my lifestyle and much more, and I showed them my favourite eco-friendly / second hand / vintage items, from jackets and dresses to bags and other accessories.

If you have any questions or comments, leave them below.

Margate Beach Clean September 8th 2018 10am-12.30pm

Events, Sustainabilitydanielle copperman5 Comments
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I recently took part in my first beach clean in Hastings, and felt so inspired to organise one of my own. I really think there should be more opportunities to get involved, especially during the summer as it's actually just a really nice day out. I went with a friend and we basically just got an all-over tan, spent some quality time together not on our phones (apart from taking this photo) and did our part to help keep the planet clean and oceans healthy.

I'm going to be hosting a beach clean on September 8th, in Margate (just over 1 1/2 hours from London by train, and 2 hours by car), from 10am-12.30pm. Margate is brimming with really fun things to do too; from art galleries, vintage and boutique stores to amazing cafes and restaurants and, of course, Dreamland. So join us and make a day out of it. Get out of the city for a few hours and enjoy a day by the beach, helping us to keep the beaches and oceans clean.

We will be providing some all-natural snacks on the day, as well as some wonderful gifts from the likes of Qnola and Haeckels skincare (made in Margate!).

If you are coming, please let me know by simply leaving a comment on this blog post, including the number of friends you will be coming with.

We will meet near the Margate Clocktower - keep update on my instagram for exact details.

Hope you can join us! 

Simple Sustainable Swaps

Essentials, Lifestyle, Natural Living, Sustainability, Videodanielle coppermanComment

In this video I share a few simple tips and tools for making more natural, sustainable and conscious lifestyle choices. 

Modern day materials - such as plastic and cotton - are having damaging affects on our lives and on the planet, and things are getting worse. By swapping things made with synthetic materials for things made with more natural, renewable, recyclable and biodegradable materials, and which involve more environmentally friendly processes, we can all make a difference and play a part in reducing the amount of pollution and physical waste ending up in landfill or in the oceans.

Find out more on my website ~ www.daniellecopperman.com ~ and shop some of the items mentioned in this video here, http://daniellecopperman.com/store-1/.